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Are nematodes in the sand in coastal areas a problem in Texas like in Florida?


Dwarf Fan

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I have heard that “nematodes in the sand” can mysteriously cause the death of otherwise healthy Palms from the genus Jubaea and Trachycarpus after years of problem free growth.

Is this a known problem in Texas like in Florida?

I am in Corpus Christi does anyone know if the nematodes of Palm death lurk in the coastal sands of Texas?

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4 minutes ago, Dwarf Fan said:

I have heard that “nematodes in the sand” can mysteriously cause the death of otherwise healthy Palms from the genus Jubaea and Trachycarpus after years of problem free growth.

Is this a known problem in Texas like in Florida?

I am in Corpus Christi does anyone know if the nematodes of Palm death lurk in the coastal sands of Texas?

Nematodes live anywhere there is warm, sandy soil ..so yes, if soil conditions are ideal, they're present.

That said, there are beneficial and pathogenic species of Nematodes..  Pays to do as much homework on both kinds, and how to deal with the harmful ones as you can.

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Yes 100%...the same root knot nematodes that attack most vegetable crops here, Meloidogyne spp. Favored tropical landscape hosts include hibiscus, gardenia, impatiens, coleus. ixora, and many others.

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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31 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Yes 100%...the same root knot nematodes that attack most vegetable crops here, Meloidogyne spp. Favored tropical landscape hosts include hibiscus, gardenia, impatiens, coleus. ixora, and many others.

Should I just avoid planting Jubaea and Trachycarpus and I will be fine or can nematodes kill other palms as well?

Should I be taking steps to rid my yard form nematodes as a general “good practice” before planting a bunch of various species of palms in my backyard?

I picked up a hibiscus sabdariffa from John Fairey Garden is it going to attract nematodes or be target once put in ground?

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37 minutes ago, Dwarf Fan said:

Should I be taking steps to rid my yard form nematodes as a general “good practice” before planting a bunch of various species of palms in my backyard?

I picked up a hibiscus sabdariffa from John Fairey Garden is it going to attract nematodes or be target once put in ground?

Generally if it grows in your area/elsewhere in S. Texas or Florida then you should be good to go. Most tropical/hot summer palms seem to be ok, monocots as a whole seem generally less susceptible. I doubt you will find an answer to how all of these hybrids respond to nematode infested soil, guess yours can be the guinea pigs. 

"Rid yard of nematodes"? Hahahaha in your dreams, it's impossible. They are everywhere and will quickly colonize raised beds and even pots eventually if there is contact with ground. 

I grew Hibiscus sabdariffa for several seasons and didn't find it to be a nematode magnet (nothing like its relative, okra, which gets annihalated). However it was prone to Fusarium which would cause very sudden death in a plant that was thriving just a day or two before. Another edible Hibiscus, H. acetosella (cranberry hibiscus), seems immune to most everything. As far as the landscape tropical hibiscus go, most older cultivars like 'President', 'Painted Lady', 'Seminole Pink' seem to have moderate resistance. Most newer fancy hybrids have no resistance. H. schizopetalus and anything hybridized with it like 'Albo Lacinatus', 'Archeri', etc have high resistance. 

 

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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5 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Generally if it grows in your area/elsewhere in S. Texas or Florida then you should be good to go. Most tropical/hot summer palms seem to be ok, monocots as a whole seem generally less susceptible. I doubt you will find an answer to how all of these hybrids respond to nematode infested soil, guess yours can be the guinea pigs. 

"Rid yard of nematodes"? Hahahaha in your dreams, it's impossible. They are everywhere and will quickly colonize raised beds and even pots eventually if there is contact with ground. 

I grew Hibiscus sabdariffa for several seasons and didn't find it to be a nematode magnet (nothing like its relative, okra, which gets annihalated). However it was prone to Fusarium which would cause very sudden death in a plant that was thriving just a day or two before. Another edible Hibiscus, H. acetosella (cranberry hibiscus), seems immune to most everything. As far as the landscape tropical hibiscus go, most older cultivars like 'President', 'Painted Lady', 'Seminole Pink' seem to have moderate resistance. Most newer fancy hybrids have no resistance. H. schizopetalus and anything hybridized with it like 'Albo Lacinatus', 'Archeri', etc have high resistance. 

 

Not sure about monocot things like Bamboos, but several  " common " turf - type grasses are highly susceptible to Nematodes ( Bermuda, Centipede, etc ) ..though the ones that attack grasses belong to other Nematode groups rather that the Root Knot group(s)

Agree that Hibiscus are about half and half resistance-wise, with less intensely hybridized cultivars ( the " older " / classic ones you noted ) are generally the most resistant.

 

1 hour ago, Dwarf Fan said:

 

Should I be taking steps to rid my yard form nematodes as a general “good practice” before planting a bunch of various species of palms in my backyard?

I picked up a hibiscus sabdariffa from John Fairey Garden is it going to attract nematodes or be target once put in ground?


There are a few things you can do -naturally- to help bring nematode numbers down, ..though, like Xenon mentions, you'll never get rid of them completely.  As mentioned, there are numerous species ( and / or groups ) that are beneficial and don't attack the roots of plants..

While it may not be viable on a large scale, using Crab / Lobster shell meal can be effective at killing the parasitic ones.

 Stuff like Marigolds, Dahlia, Partridge Pea,  ( new one to me, lol ) are just a few things you can plant that will deter them / help reduce their #'s..  Partridge Pea is a nice looking, summer annual wildflower that you can spread around easily. Won't effect the growth of any palms / other stuff ..May actually enhance growth since the roots of this plant fixes / releases Nitrogen back into the soil.

I've hears some Sennas ..S. alata specifically,   Moringa,  Dill,  and a few other things may also reduce the # of the bad Nematodes as well  ..No idea how true / effective they are though.

There may also be some Fungi- based Nematode controls around, but not sure if ..or how widely available they might / might not be.

Regardless, as mentioned, there are plenty of the little buggers you want around since those specific types kill the bad ones, help keep the #'s of other soil dwelling " pest " insects down ( by consuming them ..from the inside out )

Good article on that subject:  https://agrilifetoday.tamu.edu/2022/06/23/beneficial-nematodes-could-be-key-to-plant-defenses/

 

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Nematodes seem to be everywhere.  In my area they are a serious pest to Lily bulb growers that use monoculture in their farms.  They use all kinds of terrible poisons to kill the nematodes, but they also kill the good ones that prey on bulb nematodes.  I have two very healthy Jubaea of 40 years+ that are growing in good organic soil that has never been poisoned, and they are doing fine.  Many of the farmers are learning the hard way that if they use pesticides and poisons year after year that eventually their soil is sterile and won't grow anything.  IMG_0235.thumb.JPG.d75e6767dd90ed8bc539f1646f93553c.JPG

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15 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:



While it may not be viable on a large scale, using Crab / Lobster shell meal can be effective at killing the parasitic ones.

 Stuff like Marigolds, Dahlia, Partridge Pea,  ( new one to me, lol ) are just a few things you can plant that will deter them / help reduce their #'s..  Partridge Pea is a nice looking, summer annual wildflower that you can spread around easily. Won't effect the growth of any palms / other stuff ..May actually enhance growth since the roots of this plant fixes / releases Nitrogen back into the soil.

I've hears some Sennas ..S. alata specifically,   Moringa,  Dill,  and a few other things may also reduce the # of the bad Nematodes as well  ..No idea how true / effective they are though.

 

Yes, this works in a rotationtal crop system where the nematode non-host or suppresant is used to lower nematode levels so that you can grow a following susceptible crop. The soil becomes infested after one or two crops and you have to repeat the process. Many cover crops are grown for this purpose like sunn hemp, velvet bean, winter rye, sorghum sudangrass, etc. Wouldn't really work in a landscape/perennial system though. Certain compounds also inhibit nematodes so mulches from things like neem leaves, citrus peels, etc can be effective. But it would be very localized and doesn't scale to acreage or even a typical suburban garden. 

Best to just plant resistant things or use a nematode resistant rootstock for dicots. I also suspect plants from temperate/oceanic climates have no adaptation to the nematodes found in the subtropics/tropics even if the climate doesn't kill them outright. Even genetic resistance is a tricky thing, some forms of resistance break down under high soil temperatures (as is the case with "resistant" tomato varieties) and some forms of resistance are limited to certain strains of nematodes rather than broad resistance. 

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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39 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Yes, this works in a rotationtal crop system where the nematode non-host or suppresant is used to lower nematode levels so that you can grow a following susceptible crop. The soil becomes infested after one or two crops and you have to repeat the process. Many cover crops are grown for this purpose like sunn hemp, velvet bean, winter rye, sorghum sudangrass, etc. Wouldn't really work in a landscape/perennial system though. Certain compounds also inhibit nematodes so mulches from things like neem leaves, citrus peels, etc can be effective. But it would be very localized and doesn't scale to acreage or even a typical suburban garden. 

Best to just plant resistant things or use a nematode resistant rootstock for dicots. I also suspect plants from temperate/oceanic climates have no adaptation to the nematodes found in the subtropics/tropics even if the climate doesn't kill them outright. Even genetic resistance is a tricky thing, some forms of resistance break down under high soil temperatures (as is the case with "resistant" tomato varieties) and some forms of resistance are limited to certain strains of nematodes rather than broad resistance. 

Agree, planting resistant things is top priority.. I save using crabshell meal for potted stuff.  Imagine i would cost too much to apply to everything throughout a landscape.  Easy to spread Marigold and / or Partridge Pea around susceptible plants though.. Good " soft " mulch source when chopped and dropped after those plants die down each fall / winter too.

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