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Most northern washingtonia


NWpalms@206

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I have noticed this palm several times from the water on our boat at the south end of Vashon island WA… always thought it was a big trachy from a distance. Finally got a little closer and realized it is a massive Washingtonia palm with the deck built around it. Along with a couple smaller ones to left.  I was shocked when I realized! Has to be the largest this far north. Worth a share! 

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Mature Cordylines are a zone 9 indicator. That has to be the northern most unprotected Washy in North America. I know there were a couple of sizeable ones in BC but they got pretty good protection and eventually outgrew it and died. 

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On 9/6/2023 at 12:25 PM, NWpalms@206 said:

I have noticed this palm several times from the water on our boat at the south end of Vashon island WA… always thought it was a big trachy from a distance. Finally got a little closer and realized it is a massive Washingtonia palm with the deck built around it. Along with a couple smaller ones to left.  I was shocked when I realized! Has to be the largest this far north. Worth a share! 

IMG_8208.jpeg

That’s awesome! I know there’s Trachys around Victoria and Vancouver. 

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That must be one heck of a microclimate! The best Oregon can do to support a washy is along the coast, so that is impressive!

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On 9/9/2023 at 7:20 PM, JacoPalmsCo said:

That’s awesome! I know there’s Trachys around Victoria and Vancouver. 

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I know the man that spearheaded that project with the City of Vancouver.

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Just now, Las Palmas Norte said:

I know the man that spearheaded that project with the City of Vancouver.

That’s cool, I’ve read about him.  ThePalms were planted 40 or so years ago

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13 minutes ago, JacoPalmsCo said:

That’s cool, I’ve read about him.  ThePalms were planted 40 or so years ago

I joined the PNWPEPS in the late 90's and the plan was in the works then, so about 35 years ago. That ultimately inspired residents to plant palms too. 

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Just now, Las Palmas Norte said:

I joined the PNWPEPS in the late 90's and the plan was in the works then, so about 35 years ago. That ultimately inspired residents to plant palms too. 

Yeah, well they’re very cool. What’s the extreme cold temp up there?

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1 minute ago, JacoPalmsCo said:

Yeah, well they’re very cool. What’s the extreme cold temp up there?

Without the info in front of me it's likely around 0°F / -18°C (all time low) which would likely never have happened during the past 35 years or even in that location. Seaside locations temperatures are moderated and rare extremes are ephemeral.  It would be a stretch to even see average winters lows drop to 15°F / -9C, again of short duration. Typically it rains most of the winter with a few cold spells tossed in. A solid zone 8b.

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Just now, Las Palmas Norte said:

Without the info in front of me it's likely around 0°F / -18°C (all time low) which would likely never have happened during the past 35 years or even in that location. Seaside locations temperatures are moderated and rare extremes are ephemeral.  It would be a stretch to even see average winters lows drop to 15°F / -9C, again of short duration. Typically it rains most of the winter with a few cold spells tossed in. A solid zone 8b.

For Canada, I’d say thats pretty dang good

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Just now, JacoPalmsCo said:

For Canada, I’d say thats pretty dang good

And I know theres a beach called port Dover that imports full size queen palms during the summer.

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2 hours ago, JacoPalmsCo said:

For Canada, I’d say thats pretty dang good

There's some regions that are Zone 9a and grow (or should grow) some great stuff. Here's a quick video from the west coast of our island in Tofino.

 

https://www.youtube.com/embed/PRNAJTWbXE4?si=nFnJNyP6C8MYM-q8

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Not surprising to see them that far North.  The only thing is to make sure you keep them in soil that doesn't get waterlogged and drains well.  We have those here in Coastal Georgia.  Just need to have that nice draining soil to help further them along better.

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18 hours ago, RFun said:

Not surprising to see them that far North. ...

It is if you understand the regional climate. Countless enthusiasts have tried to establish one in their gardens.

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On 9/14/2023 at 11:37 AM, Las Palmas Norte said:

It is if you understand the regional climate. Countless enthusiasts have tried to establish one in their gardens.

Oh I know this.  The problem is likely that the soil wasn't modified with a nice sandy, well draining mix.  Also, a sheltered spot out of the rain would be helpful as well the palm being put on an elevated area where water doesn't pool.  Not easy there, but it can be done.

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1 hour ago, RFun said:

Oh I know this.  The problem is likely that the soil wasn't modified with a nice sandy, well draining mix.  Also, a sheltered spot out of the rain would be helpful as well the palm being put on an elevated area where water doesn't pool.  Not easy there, but it can be done.

Once the autumn settles in here, even record temps are not impressive. Washingtonia resents long periods of cool humidity punctuated with cold snaps. As you've pointed out, I have seen some pretty decent sized Washingtonia & they've had the luxury of the owners erecting an overhead canopy and even that may not be enough with a rare event.

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