Jump to content
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

Never look back! (Palms planted in former houses)


Yunder Wækraus

Recommended Posts

Our old Florida house, which we sold in 2018, is on the market. It had no landscaping when we bought it, and I spent a fair amount of money and time in getting Florida native palms in the yard. We had a royal palm, which had been raised in the Glades, brought in by crane. We also had a fantastic Everglades palm cluster professional installed in front of the entrance as a privacy hedge of sorts. I obtained native thatch palms and buccaneer palms, which were doing very well (if growing slowly). I put in a small coconut and a traveler's palm, too. The new owners ripped out everything but the royal, cocount, and traveler's palm :(

That coconut was bent flat in one direction by Hurricane Matthew, and then Irma bent it back in the other! I'm surprised by how big it looks, as I couldn't have bought it any earlier than 2015 or 2016, when it was still in a pot I could lift and move by hand. That royal did better while I owned it because I'd let the well water, which didn't have to be pumped (there was enough natural pressure for a steady drip) slowly saturate its roots all day each day during the drier months.

They also tore out my sea grapes, which I'm pretty sure is illegal. Oh well...it was a nice little house on a great little barrier island. RIP, native palms that lost their lives because I abandoned them :(

 

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.41.30 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.41.43 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.43.38 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.43.50 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.44.02 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.44.29 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.44.50 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.45.08 PM.png

Screenshot 2023-09-02 at 1.46.12 PM.png

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand the pain.

I grow a lot of palms and other plants from seed, and naturally I sell many of them. Simply because I won't have space for them all, and because I need funds to finance my botanical activities. But every plant I've grown from seed, when I'm selling them, I always think about how the new owner might not care for them as well as I did, and how they may even neglect them resulting in the plants' demise. I always feel a sense of loss when selling away plants I've given life to. Nothing I can do about it. Just part of my life, have to live with it. 

 

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Species I'm growing from seed: Chrysalidocarpos leptocheilos, Licuala grandis, Hyophorbe verschaffeltii, Johannesteijsmannia altifrons, Bentinckia condapanna, Livistona benthamii.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, meridannight said:

I understand the pain.

I grow a lot of palms and other plants from seed, and naturally I sell many of them. Simply because I won't have space for them all, and because I need funds to finance my botanical activities. But every plant I've grown from seed, when I'm selling them, I always think about how the new owner might not care for them as well as I did, and how they may even neglect them resulting in the plants' demise. I always feel a sense of loss when selling away plants I've given life to. Nothing I can do about it. Just part of my life, have to live with it. 

 

It's hard to let go. I still ask family to drive by and check our first house in California, where I planted many unusual (for the area) plants, some of which are still there more than 10 years after I planted them. I've been in our current house 3 years, which is as long as we lived in either of our other houses, but I have only planted a few things. Part of that is because we have a tiny yard with so many pipes and underground cables that I dare not dig any new holes (what I've planted has largely been planted by tearing out the builder's original plants and carefully putting new stuff in those holes), but I think another reason is I don't want to get too worried about thousands of dollars of new plants that I might someday have to hand over to a stranger :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is wild to see how fast that coconut has grown, though. That royal palm, as I said, was already fully trunked, with the green shaft starting at about 5 or 6', and it required heavy equipment to be brought in. The coconut was planted later that same summer, and it was in a plastic pot that was capable of being moved by hand (if with some difficulty). Here's a picture of it on the day it was planted in August of 2015. It still had the shell on its base, and there really wasn't trunk yet. Now, its crown equals the royal, and it has almost as much trunk! More proof that the coconuts are meant for the heavy salt spray and almost-pure sand soils of Barrier Island (the stupid name for the barrier island on which we lived).

No photo description available.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The very first palm seed I ever sprouted was a Canary Islands Date Palm. At the time I thought it was a Mexican Fan Palm, since I collected a bunch of seeds as a teen and planted them in some pots in my room. It was the very fact that it was not a Mexican Fan Palm that sorta made this special. I was always able to point to this as my first palm I ever grew from seed. It was only about a year or so ago that I finally sold this palm. It had survived in a pot for all these years (I'm 35 now) and it was much smaller than it would have been if it had been in the ground. Tucked away in the back yard, where I didn't get to it as much as I would have liked, I knew it was too big for me to plant in the yard. I sold it to someone locally for $20 (it was in a sad state of affairs). To my surprise, I received an unexpected message from the buyer later this year with a picture of it in their yard and a thank you. They said they thought I'd like to know how it was doing (it was doing great). 

Sometimes looking back might be worth it. But I know it goes both ways. 

 

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand how you feel I sell Johannesteijsmannia palms I only sell them to true gardeners sold only to a good home some people are not interested in someone else’s vision or future preservation 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...