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2024 NEW CALEDONIA BIENNIAL REGISTRATION/INFORMATION - Exceptional Adventure ×

Chrysalidocarpus saintalucie let’s see more of them


happypalms

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Another classic palm that is one for the collection the saintelucie with its straight as an arrow shuttlecock look  shape cold tolerant a real winner in any garden situation I just love it absolutely gorgeous very easy to grow just add water

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I may be able to add to this soon, mine is young but you give me something to aspire to!

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On the left in this picture. It's still wobbly, even at this size, but a beautiful palm!

edit: had to go get better pictures.

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2 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

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Imagine all the destruction it would cause were you to set it free...

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Just kidding... I know these have a reputation of being "wobbly". Curious if yours is starting to stabilize, or will likely need "restraints" indefinitely. It's a gorgeous palm either way!!!

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Stacey Wright  |  Graphic Designer

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5 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

On the left in this picture. It's still wobbly, even at this size, but a beautiful palm!

edit: had to go get better pictures.

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I never had an issues with the my palm being needed to be stabilised although it did grow up next to the old greenhouse I had so it was protected from the wind as juvenile I have another small one in the open so will keep a eye on it 

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Both of mine required support due to their unstable root system which did not keep pace with foliage growth.  I added support in decorative rocks around the base of one and after a couple of years now with those in place, finally removed the supporting stakes and ties a couple of weeks ago.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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Now you got me worried is it gonna blow over.  LOL  It survived a few days of some pretty strong winds the weak of the Maui fire.  Now I gotta go check it out.

Planted 1g plant in June of 21.  Here it is today after 2 years in the ground.

 

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Steve

Born in the Bronx

Raised in Brooklyn

Matured In Wai`anae

I can't be held responsible for anything I say or do....LOL

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These are a wonderful addition to any garden.  Yes, this species is particularly unsteady for the first few years.  The one on the right was especially wobbly and never staked.  When it finally anchored itself, it was listing to one side.  The middle one went into the ground in 2013 from a one gallon.  The one on the left went into the ground in 2015 from a 5 gallon.  The one on the right also went into the ground in 2015, but from a one gallon.  Today there is not a whole lot of size difference between them.  The middle one has about 6.5 ft of trunk while the two outer ones have about 5 ft of trunk.  Total height just under 20 ft (6 m).  This is why I have a strong preference for buying 4" and one gallon pots.  Cheaper, easy to transport, easy to dig a small hole, and after a few years the small ones often catch up to the bigger ones.

These are prolific seed producers.  The white towel on the ground was used to collect the most recent crop, probably 500-1000 seeds.  I germinated a dozen seeds several years so I would have babies to give to garden visitors, but I do not need 1000 babies.  Not sure why I bothered collecting seeds.  Emotionally it is difficult to let them go to waste.  It is a lot of trouble to tie the inflorescence up so it won't snap off as the developing seeds get heavier and the lower, old crownshafts holding the inflorescence fall away.  This may be the last time I bother trying to save the inflorescence.  Old guys like me should not be on step ladders tying ropes around developing inflorescences.

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The white crownshaft is the big draw for this species, but occasionally the old frond falls away to reveal an attractively colored fresh crownshaft.  Marojejya in the background.  

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Don't forget to include C. basilongus in the garden.  Very similar to C. saintelucei, but a little more slender.

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34 minutes ago, Rick Kelley said:

These are a wonderful addition to any garden.  Yes, this species is particularly unsteady for the first few years.  The one on the right was especially wobbly and never staked.  When it finally anchored itself, it was listing to one side.  The middle one went into the ground in 2013 from a one gallon.  The one on the left went into the ground in 2015 from a 5 gallon.  The one on the right also went into the ground in 2015, but from a one gallon.  Today there is not a whole lot of size difference between them.  The middle one has about 6.5 ft of trunk while the two outer ones have about 5 ft of trunk.  Total height just under 20 ft (6 m).  This is why I have a strong preference for buying 4" and one gallon pots.  Cheaper, easy to transport, easy to dig a small hole, and after a few years the small ones often catch up to the bigger ones.

These are prolific seed producers.  The white towel on the ground was used to collect the most recent crop, probably 500-1000 seeds.  I germinated a dozen seeds several years so I would have babies to give to garden visitors, but I do not need 1000 babies.  Not sure why I bothered collecting seeds.  Emotionally it is difficult to let them go to waste.  It is a lot of trouble to tie the inflorescence up so it won't snap off as the developing seeds get heavier and the lower, old crownshafts holding the inflorescence fall away.  This may be the last time I bother trying to save the inflorescence.  Old guys like me should not be on step ladders tying ropes around developing inflorescences.

saintlucei8-23-1.thumb.jpeg.5b0968e90d6d4ef303f669a5c2351450.jpeg

The white crownshaft is the big draw for this species, but occasionally the old frond falls away to reveal an attractively colored fresh crownshaft.  Marojejya in the background.  

Dypsissainteluceiredcrownshaft-1.thumb.jpeg.aec7f5b53a5643c1c01fad3bdc60a25d.jpeg

Don't forget to include C. basilongus in the garden.  Very similar to C. saintelucei, but a little more slender.

Nice palms lucky Hawaii growers I have 3 basilongus in the ground only small though love the marojejya I have one 

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23 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

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Seeing the way that the crownshaft was splitting high up on the lowest retained leaf looked very familiar to me.  The relatively thin crownshaft on this species seems to be prone to splitting like this.  I see it both on my thicker trunked specimen in abundant sun, as well as the narrower girth one that spent most of it's time up until now in heavy shade.  Photo of one of mine doing the same thing below.

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33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

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Checked mine this morning. Looks solid. 

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Steve

Born in the Bronx

Raised in Brooklyn

Matured In Wai`anae

I can't be held responsible for anything I say or do....LOL

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Now you guys have me worried about my one in the open needing to be supported 

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Just little 3-4 leaf seedlings over here. Planning to tease at least couple into maturity….eventually.

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