Jump to content
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT LOGGING IN ×
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

How are our California palm people doing with the tropical storm?


Jeff zone 8 N.C.

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Jeff zone 8 N.C. said:

Hoping all are well.

 

1 hour ago, Dwarf Fan said:

California doesn’t really get “weather” like the South, they will be fine.

Curious about how a tropical storm effects CA? check this out..

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My palms are happy with the 3.5" of rain we got from Hilary. Not as much wind as we were expecting so no knock downs even with my large Caryota's . They even had their roots massaged with a few earthquakes!! We were less than 15 miles from the epicenter in Ojai . The prediction of an El Nino event usually means a warmer than usual winter with higher rainfalls , all good for palms and cycads. My Roystonia Venezualiana has never looked better. Harry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was a welcome bit of rain and break from the heat for Central California. Everything seemed to perk up with the added humidity and rain. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, Harry’s Palms said:

My palms are happy with the 3.5" of rain we got from Hilary. Not as much wind as we were expecting so no knock downs even with my large Caryota's . They even had their roots massaged with a few earthquakes!! We were less than 15 miles from the epicenter in Ojai . The prediction of an El Nino event usually means a warmer than usual winter with higher rainfalls , all good for palms and cycads. My Roystonia Venezualiana has never looked better. Harry

 

15 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

It was a welcome bit of rain and break from the heat for Central California. Everything seemed to perk up with the added humidity and rain. 

 

On 8/21/2023 at 11:20 PM, Dwarf Fan said:

California doesn’t really get “weather” like the South, they will be fine.

^^^ See, I knew they were gonna be alright, a little extra rain is never a bad thing for California.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad to hear all is ok.  A lot of people freak out at a little storm. Local east coasters usually just plan hurricane parties and rejoice in a day or two off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jeff zone 8 N.C. said:

Glad to hear all is ok.  A lot of people freak out at a little storm. Local east coasters usually just plan hurricane parties and rejoice in a day or two off.

It wasn't just a "little storm" but it moved very quickly, which heavily altered its potential impact. There was a lot of attention made, but that is probably very important in a place that doesn't understand the potential impacts as well as do people in the south/southeast U.S. The coastal areas tended to fare well. A LOT of damage in the low deserts, particularly in the Palm Springs area. Buildings and roads inundated with water and mud, many trees down, weirdly including palms snapped in two. When a huge amount of rainfall comes down out here, we are at the mercy of what happens in the surrounding vast mountain ranges, a couple of which soar to over 11,000 feet. This means that what falls there, comes to us here. There is no snowfall to absorb the impact at high elevations, as in winter storms. As a result the I-10 was covered with water and mud and 30 miles of it was shut down. Huge cascades of forest 'slash' (logs and forest debris) arrived from the areas leading up to Big Bear. Many other roads were heavily impacted, some completely undermined by the raging torrent. It's just a rather different experience from storms in the eastern U.S., but can be incredibly damaging. We are all lucky that no lives seem to have been lost, but there is a good amount of property damage out here in the low desert.

Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, mnorell said:

It wasn't just a "little storm" but it moved very quickly, which heavily altered its potential impact. There was a lot of attention made, but that is probably very important in a place that doesn't understand the potential impacts as well as do people in the south/southeast U.S. The coastal areas tended to fare well. A LOT of damage in the low deserts, particularly in the Palm Springs area. Buildings and roads inundated with water and mud, many trees down, weirdly including palms snapped in two. When a huge amount of rainfall comes down out here, we are at the mercy of what happens in the surrounding vast mountain ranges, a couple of which soar to over 11,000 feet. This means that what falls there, comes to us here. There is no snowfall to absorb the impact at high elevations, as in winter storms. As a result the I-10 was covered with water and mud and 30 miles of it was shut down. Huge cascades of forest 'slash' (logs and forest debris) arrived from the areas leading up to Big Bear. Many other roads were heavily impacted, some completely undermined by the raging torrent. It's just a rather different experience from storms in the eastern U.S., but can be incredibly damaging. We are all lucky that no lives seem to have been lost, but there is a good amount of property damage out here in the low desert.

Sorry my post was poorly worded and I did not mean to call the California storm "little". I meant to be speaking of storms in general. The media always hypes them up and scares a lot of people.  And I know it's for profit but also it is to inform those that are not aware of what can happen.  Of course there is always some damage, as it is a storm.  My reason for starting this post was to find out if our palm people were ok. I hope I did not offend anyone. My sincerest apologies to anyone who had losses. By the way, did you have any losses? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...