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Oraniopsis appendiculata


happypalms

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Even rarer in Australia is the Oraniopsis appendiculata they take the cold temperatures down to 2 degrees and the the heat up to 43 degrees drought tolerant and so slow this one in my garden is around 20 years young I did manage to buy another not long ago (thanks Justin) 

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Would love to get my hands on one of these. I was able to visit 10m tall trunked ones in habitat in 2005 in the Atherton table lands. Unforgettable and ancient. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Thanks for the thread Richard, you don’t hear about this palm often enough, and Tyrone, I can only imagine what the species looked like in habitat. 

They do pretty well here in the cool tropics of East Hawaii and are moderate growers. I planted one way back in early 2010 from a three gallon pot.  I’ll try a post a photo later on today. No trunk yet, but already has quite a presence. 

Tim

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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drought tolerant ? Not so. It might survive but they hate dry and hardly ever grow if dry. 

it’s a palm that adores a lot of water and will grow in water. Likely would survive -5C too. 
 

nice post 

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4 hours ago, KrisKupsch said:

drought tolerant ? Not so. It might survive but they hate dry and hardly ever grow if dry. 

it’s a palm that adores a lot of water and will grow in water. Likely would survive -5C too. 
 

nice post 

That’s awesome info. 
 

The ones I saw in habitat were in a slushy swampy upland stream swamp area, which agrees with what you are saying. 
 

I need to get my hands on this one again. My last one was from Rosebud farm, but had stressed itself through a heatwave on the trip down to Albany when we moved down and eventually died. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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4 hours ago, KrisKupsch said:

drought tolerant ? Not so. It might survive but they hate dry and hardly ever grow if dry. 

it’s a palm that adores a lot of water and will grow in water. Likely would survive -5C too. 
 

nice post 

True not drought tolerant but will survive thats most likely why the one I have is so slow and wants to drink water like a drowning fish 

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I got this one as a Christmas gift years back. It started off really slow but has picked up in the past couple. Really beautiful imo 

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For my climate, this is the slowest growing palm I have ever experienced.

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San Francisco, California

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13 hours ago, KrisKupsch said:

drought tolerant ? Not so. It might survive but they hate dry and hardly ever grow if dry. 

it’s a palm that adores a lot of water and will grow in water. Likely would survive -5C too. 
 

nice post 

Agree. I made the mistake years ago of letting a seedling slightly dry out and it dies near instantly. Wasn’t even hot or warm at the time, I think it was April and I eased off water after getting it through summer. Won’t make that mistake again. 
 

Luckily I got a replacement. It got a bit of crown rot after a wet Spring in 2022, but otherwise happy in a heavily shaded, moist position. 

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Tim Brisbane

Patterson Lakes, bayside Melbourne, Australia

Rarely Frost

2005 Minimum: 2.6C,  Maximum: 44C

2005 Average: 17.2C, warmest on record.

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11 hours ago, Tyrone said:

That’s awesome info. 
 

The ones I saw in habitat were in a slushy swampy upland stream swamp area, which agrees with what you are saying. 
 

I need to get my hands on this one again. My last one was from Rosebud farm, but had stressed itself through a heatwave on the trip down to Albany when we moved down and eventually died. 

I’ve many if WA let you receive. 

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11 hours ago, happypalms said:

True not drought tolerant but will survive thats most likely why the one I have is so slow and wants to drink water like a drowning fish 

Visit me sometime in Burringbar. I’ll show you sites they like. I’ve maybe 30 planted.

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11 hours ago, Tyrone said:

That’s awesome info. 
 

The ones I saw in habitat were in a slushy swampy upland stream swamp area, which agrees with what you are saying. 
 

I need to get my hands on this one again. My last one was from Rosebud farm, but had stressed itself through a heatwave on the trip down to Albany when we moved down and eventually died. 

The one I have is from rosebud farm I credit most of my collection that is established in my garden from rosebud (rip rich) 

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14 minutes ago, KrisKupsch said:

Visit me sometime in Burringbar. I’ll show you sites they like. I’ve maybe 30 planted.

Will do always interested in any information about gardening and always learning something new thanks 

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3 minutes ago, happypalms said:

The one I have is from rosebud farm I credit most of my collection that is established in my garden from rosebud (rip rich) 

I miss Rich. He made palm collecting so easy in Australia. I was fortunate to meet him twice when visiting his nursery. A real nice guy. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Darold Petty said:

For my climate, this is the slowest growing palm I have ever experienced.

They are slow I thought joeys in my climate were slower than a wet week Oraniopsis even slower 

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4 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

I miss Rich. He made palm collecting so easy in Australia. I was fortunate to meet him twice when visiting his nursery. A real nice guy. 

A true palm guru when I get a plaque made up for my garden Rich’s name will be top of the list 

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4 minutes ago, happypalms said:

They are slow I thought joeys in my climate were slower than a wet week Oraniopsis even slower 

In northland NZ they are almost fast. Red soil. No extremes of cold or heat. I’ve them over my head in 20 years here on the far nensw coast. I expect flowers any moment. 

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12 minutes ago, KrisKupsch said:

In northland NZ they are almost fast. Red soil. No extremes of cold or heat. I’ve them over my head in 20 years here on the far nensw coast. I expect flowers any moment. 

Crazy a palm from the far north tropics growing so well in kiwi land I will be up your way in a couple of weeks cheers 

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15 minutes ago, KrisKupsch said:

In northland NZ they are almost fast. Red soil. No extremes of cold or heat. I’ve them over my head in 20 years here on the far nensw coast. I expect flowers any moment. 

That makes sense. Rich volcanic soil, abundant rainfall, and year round mild temps, probably very similar to the Atherton tablelands and places like Mt Lewis. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Here’s are a couple of photos of one that’s been in the ground for 13 years now from a 3 gal. pot. Growing well and looks like time for a good feed. 

Kris, if you get the time, post a few photos.

Tim

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Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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Here’s a beast from Landsendt gardens, Auckland NZ. I saw some massive ones up in the northern parts of NZ. 

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Tim Brisbane

Patterson Lakes, bayside Melbourne, Australia

Rarely Frost

2005 Minimum: 2.6C,  Maximum: 44C

2005 Average: 17.2C, warmest on record.

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