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Is this silver bismarck thirsty?


adwizard

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IMG_20230214_175215865_HDR.thumb.jpg.f74718584f1470b865f2b485c8fe7409.jpgI have a Silver Bismarck. It was transplanted over 40 days ago. I watered it everyday for 30 days straight religiously. Now I water it every other day as per nursery instructions. Is this bismarck not getting enough water? Ive read drooping fronds can be a sign of overwatered, underwatered or shock. Not all but some fronds are turning brown and crispy. I've decided to water the heck out of it tomorrow and see if she doesnt perk up. Any advice? See pic. Thanks. 

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Cant help but tell that you are in SWFL with all the blue tarps in the background.  It looks like it has had some wind damage, possibly from this past weekend.  Being the older fronds I don't think there is much to worry about.  Lots of good looking new fronds emerging! This is our cold season and not the ideal time of year to transplant so it will be a little while before the palm starts to thrive.  Any way we can get a photo of the entire canopy?

Edited by KFain
Update on recent weather impacts
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Yes, here is a shot from Feb 2. I'm in Cape Coral.  We had a very cold Dec and Jan. Plus very windy. Everyday. How did you know? Anyway, I'm not sure how to treat this beautiful beast. It seems like only one side is getting dry. Can't figure that out. But I'll stick with the game plan and water every other day now for awhile. IMG_20230202_144523523.thumb.jpg.d3c74406618107002a9b693abed337f8.jpg

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That is a good looking palm for sure!

Once again, lots of new full size fronds on their way.  I think you will be very happy in a few months. Stick with the plan.

Lower fronds showing some transplant shock and wind damage.  Is the "dry" side on the west or north west, where the heavy North winds would have hit? 

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I have no experience at all with this palm but Bismarcks are not known for transplanting well. They have sensitive roots and it is generally not recommended to buy field grown specimens. Obviously it’s too late for that advice but did you get any sort of warranty or guarantee on this from the grower?

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It's hard to tell from the photos, but the brown/dead areas look like they might be the same spots that were wind-damaged or bent during installation.  If that's the case, I'd treat that as mostly cosmetic.  My backyard Bismarck took some seriously huge gusts in the 75-100mph range during the two hurricanes, and several fronds were bent/tattered.  Those looked kinda "meh" in the fall but after two big freezes the tattered bits are now brown and dead.  I'm going to cut them off mine when I get around to it.  My NEW growth all looks great so I am not concerned about it.  I'd check your new growth too, and sharpie across the fronds horizontally.  That way you can tell if the new growth is coming out consistently.  With a couple of cold fronts growth won't be rapid this time of year, but it should be progressing.

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Hi adwizard, would you please keep us posted about the health of this palm?  Your experience will be valuable to others.

Andrei W. Konradi, Burlingame, California.  Vicarious appreciator of palms in other people's gardens and in habitat

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I have a clay soil in some parts of my property.  I'm in Southern California.  I have had troubles with fungus, especially with Encephalartos.  When I get fungal problems with palm trees, from overwatering, I get browning at the ends of the leaves like your pictures show.  It is not fatal for the palm trees like it is for the cycads, but I back off on the watering.

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It’s not fungus. My best Bizzy sits in a few inches of water most of the summer. I get ultimate lows varying from 19-26 every year. It’s not cold damage.

Transplant shock. Liquid root stimulator will help prevent it when transplanting, but the damage is there. It will grow out of it.

These are tough palms. 

Edited by D Palm
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I have planted these here in all sorts of ground and they are very tolerant but do grow best with good drainage.

Located on Vanua Levu near Savusavu (16degrees South) Elevation from sealevel to 30meters with average annual rainfall of 2800mm (110in) with temperature from 18 to 34C (65 to 92F).

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Bismarckia is a palm that can do fine without supplemental irrigation in florida once established.  Hundreds of good looking ones are nearby lining highways.  But bismarckia is not a jungle palm  and in winter the deep roots that it normally grows will experience a long dry cycle so over watering might kill off some of the deeper roots or leave them open to infection by pathogens.  I am not sure they are immune to our pathogens in poor(wet) soil conditions here.  The one 25 footer I had in the drainage path near a neighbors sprinkler got sick 5 years ago  from presumably 23 days of rain in august that year plus irrigation.  Nearby phoenix rupicola and livistona chinensis seemed to do fine.  The yard was flooded in the low spots constantly. august that year.   The palm was eaten by weevils in sept, but it was a good looking tree before august from a 15 gallon to a 25 foot tall with 5' clear trunk.  My other biz planted in a higher drainage area away from the drainage has done very well, never did get sick and I have it in a drier spot irrigation/drainage wise.  Some palms can  sit in water and roots wont mind it , others are not so accommodating.  Look up native soils of bi9smarckia, lateritic high drainage.  I hear they grow well in madagascar!

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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