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Acrocomia Aculeata


idontknowhatnametuse

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Are these slow as seedlings? I planted my 2 Acrocomias in bigger pots last week, they seem to be doing better and they are growing but very slowly. Is this normal?

Photos of a spear of one of them below. 2nd one is kind of blurry.

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In my experience they don't grow much in winter but will speed up once it gets hot.  Do they already have adult leaves?  I can't tell from the photos.  Mine seemed to grow faster in the ground.  Yours might be still acclimating to their new environment which will slow them down as well.

Jon Sunder

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16 minutes ago, Fusca said:

In my experience they don't grow much in winter but will speed up once it gets hot.  Do they already have adult leaves?  I can't tell from the photos.  Mine seemed to grow faster in the ground.  Yours might be still acclimating to their new environment which will slow them down as well.

One of them has a pinnate leaf.

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On 1/23/2023 at 2:22 PM, Fusca said:

In my experience they don't grow much in winter but will speed up once it gets hot.  Do they already have adult leaves?  I can't tell from the photos.  Mine seemed to grow faster in the ground.  Yours might be still acclimating to their new environment which will slow them down as well.

Should I put them in the sun or leave them in shade? I have a very sunny spot in the terrace of my house.

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5 minutes ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

Should I put them in the sun or leave them in shade? I have a very sunny spot in the terrace of my house.

Definitely in sun - they don't like shade.  If it's been in shade for a long time it might be best to give it a few hours of sun at first and slowly increase the sun exposure.  Ultimately full sun is best.  

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Jon Sunder

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8 minutes ago, Fusca said:

Definitely in sun - they don't like shade.  If it's been in shade for a long time it might be best to give it a few hours of sun at first and slowly increase the sun exposure.  Ultimately full sun is best.  

If I put it in the sun, will the petioles start growing shorter? They are incredibly large. Makes it difficult to water the whole palm because water is too heavy for the fronds with those long petioles.

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25 minutes ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

If I put it in the sun, will the petioles start growing shorter? They are incredibly large. Makes it difficult to water the whole palm because water is too heavy for the fronds with those long petioles.

They might if it was grown in shade before you got it.  But the petioles are long in full sun too not to mention spiny!  :)  There's even small spines on the underside of the leaves!

Jon Sunder

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Yes, the underside spines look very nice. I like the silvery color of the undersides as well. Here's 2 photos of the underside of the leaf of one of my palms.

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Both palms are starting to grow faster. The one with the pinnate leaf is very close to completely pushing out the pinnate leaf's petiole and the one with the spear is starting to slightly open it but at the same time getting bigger.

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I haven't known this palm until recently and only because of palmtalk. I can understand why it's not the most loved city scaping palm but still it seems to be very uncommon and not appreciated enough as it seems to be very hardy in terms of drought and cold and it is nice looking palm. Plus the spines make it somewhat special. From what I've read about their habitats they are probably speeding up in summer as they grow in open hot plaines with full sun exposure.

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On 1/30/2023 at 5:08 PM, Hortulanus said:

I haven't known this palm until recently and only because of palmtalk. I can understand why it's not the most loved city scaping palm but still it seems to be very uncommon and not appreciated enough as it seems to be very hardy in terms of drought and cold and it is nice looking palm. Plus the spines make it somewhat special. From what I've read about their habitats they are probably speeding up in summer as they grow in open hot plaines with full sun exposure.

It looks very good if it gets the care it needs. Here's some urban Acrocomia Aculeata's in Merida. The south Mexico form which is a bit dwarf-ish. This is the same type of Acrocomia I recieved.

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8 hours ago, richtrav said:

Most of the A. mexicana in south Texas came from north of Tampico. 

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I think Acrocomia Mexicana might be a variety. They are very different from the ones grown in South America like Brazil. Mexicana has flatter leaves that are less plumose while other Acrocomias almost look like Queen Palms from a distance.

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20 hours ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

It looks very good if it gets the care it needs. Here's some urban Acrocomia Aculeata's in Merida. The south Mexico form which is a bit dwarf-ish. This is the same type of Acrocomia I recieved.

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It's funny because from a distance they look like queen palms and then at a second glance it's like "wait a minute...". They really look nice especially in those rows. I think they should be more common even outside of Latinoamerica.

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6 hours ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

I think Acrocomia Mexicana might be a variety. They are very different from the ones grown in South America like Brazil. Mexicana has flatter leaves that are less plumose while other Acrocomias almost look like Queen Palms from a distance.

I think it is just a variety of aculeata, the Argentine stuff might be different I’d have to check up on the literature. To me they all look like spiny queen palms, in Argentina and Paraguay you have to look at some of them up close to determine if they’re Acrocomia or Syagrus where they grow together.

 

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38 minutes ago, richtrav said:

I think it is just a variety of aculeata, the Argentine stuff might be different I’d have to check up on the literature. To me they all look like spiny queen palms, in Argentina and Paraguay you have to look at some of them up close to determine if they’re Acrocomia or Syagrus where they grow together.

 

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The ones from Argentina are Acrocomia Totai, not aculeata. Totai is a bit hardier though.

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Both palms survived the cold rain and 4⁰C completely exposed. No damage and growing.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/1/2023 at 11:40 PM, richtrav said:

Most of the A. mexicana in south Texas came from north of Tampico. 

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Are these roadside in the RGV? Or down in Mexico?

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49 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

Are these roadside in the RGV? Or down in Mexico?

Pretty sure this is Tamaulipas, Mexico. Close to Barras Del Tordo.

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4 hours ago, idontknowhatnametuse said:

Pretty sure this is Tamaulipas, Mexico. Close to Barras Del Tordo.

That is exactly where they are. There is also a disjunct population of Sabal mauritiiformis in that area too.

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48 minutes ago, richtrav said:

That is exactly where they are. There is also a disjunct population of Sabal mauritiiformis in that area too.

Any photos of the Sabal Mauritiiformis areas?

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7 hours ago, richtrav said:

image.thumb.jpeg.624e92a1c8e7eea025b105b354b3b212.jpeg 

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How cold hardy are these? My Sabal Yapa seedlings were never affected by the cold and I heard this one has similar cold hardiness.

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They had their foliage burned off in ‘21 but all the ones I know of here recovered. It is probably the most tender Sabal but still can recover from a pretty hard freeze.

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  • 1 month later...

My pinnate Acrocomia Mexicana started pushing a new leaf some days ago.

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The other one doesn't fully open its leaf yet. It's on the process of making a light green petiole full of spines. These spines get longer every time.

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