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Palms and exotics Eastbourne UK


Foxpalms

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Yesterday was a very cool wet rainy day along the south coast as the warm air mass from the canary Islands mixed with the arctic air mass that was over the UK. Despite the bad weather I took lots of photos of the palms around the seafront. Most things looked completely fine after the freeze they had just gone through. The only things that were damaged were the cannas which were all brown, unlike in central London. So as the wunderground station suggested it must have gotten to around -2c there. Lots of phoenix canariensis, butias, Brahea and especially cordylines.  

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Good photos but I think you need a better phone or camera! It almost doesn’t do them justice! Also I don’t know why so many of the Phoenix there are showing desiccated fronds? Certainly more than normal for a south coast area. Perhaps its due to the soil or something? I will be doing a big post later tonight with some big, stunning Phoenix and Washingtonia from Kent that haven’t been posted before. There are loads out there!

Edited by UK_Palms

Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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34 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

Good photos but I think you need a better phone or camera! It almost doesn’t do them justice! Also I don’t know why so many of the Phoenix there are showing desiccated fronds? Certainly more than normal for a south coast area. Perhaps its due to the soil or something? I will be doing a big post later tonight with some big, stunning Phoenix and Washingtonia from Kent that haven’t been posted before. There are loads out there!

My phone is a very powerful phone and is good at everything expect photos unfortunately. Might have to buy a camera or a second phone for photos. The huge amount of rain didn't help either and for some reason when my images get uploaded here the quality of the image goes down. I think the phoenix canariensis are planted in gravel and pebbles with sandy soil under that, so that's probably the reason the fronds are desiccated. I think the salty sea air can also make them look like that as well. I'm sure there's thousands of undocumented palms in the UK. I also wonder how that king palm at the Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens did. I saw a photo of it and its a good size so it should be fine.393074781_Screenshot_20221219-153727687(1).thumb.jpg.d408c8ba2fcc386ffd9ec1495572c408.jpg

Edited by Foxpalms
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Great photos, thanks for posting.  You really can see in the foliage it looks like they take a beating from the sea breezes, however all looking in good health otherwise.

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Manchester, Lancashire, England

53.4ºN, 2.2ºW, 65m AMSL

Köppen climate Cfb | USDA hardiness zone 9a

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