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Southern Hemisphere Growing Season 22/23


Tyrone
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15C and rainy today with winds straight off Antarctica. In fact I wonder if it’s sunnier in Antarctica today. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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23 hours ago, Tyrone said:

15C and rainy today with winds straight off Antarctica. In fact I wonder if it’s sunnier in Antarctica today. 

You're forecast is similar to the ours in early to mid may, except may is pretty sunny here. Similar temperature wise though.

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Glad to get some rain today from the south. I was getting sick of watering most days this week. Its been warmer and drier than forecast - but with with strong, drying winds from the northeast. The northeast wind was strong enough one day this week to snap a main branch off a 3 year old mulberry tree. 

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I haven’t needed to water the landscape at all yet, which is unusual for mid November here. The place is actually waterlogged. 

The 2022 average max for Sep was 18.6C, October dropped to 18C, and November has just edged past Sep with 18.7C which is 3C colder than it should be now. 

Yesterday maxed out at a crumby 13.8C with just constant precipitation. Looking forward to Wednesday when 23C is forecast. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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image.png.af4cfe990a7d2888c731d66cbc517580.png

Typical spring conditions continuing here with more wind than I would like. The rain tends to look significant in the forecast like this then it just ends up being partly cloudy with a couple of showers. The chathams nikau are starting to open their new spears like the baueri have been - so must be happy with this type of weather and being under shade cloth. UV plot is interesting to look at. 

 

image.png.2ce6c88a178e242c75b187f7cb48e61e.png

Edited by Phil Petersen
Added UV plot
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Over the weekend it was 20c on sat and 18.3c on sun in London even though the sun is very weak. From looking at the UV in London you can see why lots of people in the UK don't have a lot melanin in their skin, especially in winter! Sometimes I find what can happen is the lack of strength from the sun in winter, can cause plants to get slight sun burn around march. That sun burnt my Archontophoenix Alexandrae's outside in pots though they are fairly small, don't know if that happens Australia and New Zealand or it only occurs at high latitudes, where the sun is very weak in the winter?

Screenshot_20221115-014039611 (1).jpg

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1 hour ago, Foxpalms said:

Over the weekend it was 20c on sat and 18.3c on sun in London even though the sun is very weak. From looking at the UV in London you can see why lots of people in the UK don't have a lot melanin in their skin, especially in winter! Sometimes I find what can happen is the lack of strength from the sun in winter, can cause plants to get slight sun burn around march. That sun burnt my Archontophoenix Alexandrae's outside in pots though they are fairly small, don't know if that happens Australia and New Zealand or it only occurs at high latitudes, where the sun is very weak in the winter?

Screenshot_20221115-014039611 (1).jpg

Looks like NZ also gets down to UV 1-2 (max) in the winter:

https://niwa.co.nz/our-services/online-services/uv-and-ozone/uv-index-information

I left my 75l nikau in full winter sun this year (under a tree, but with full sun from the lower angle winter rays) and did have some slight bronzing. When the sun started to get stronger they got moved under shade cloth. 

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@Phil PetersenThe UV in London is less than a 1! On a clear day this week it only gets up to a 0.8. even in the summer we only have a few days of an index of 8. Mostly in summer it's 6 or 7. Though it does stay that strength for a few hours since the day length is up to 16 hours 38 mins in June. A UV index of 9 is extremely rare.

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3 hours ago, Foxpalms said:

@Phil PetersenThe UV in London is less than a 1! On a clear day this week it only gets up to a 0.8. even in the summer we only have a few days of an index of 8. Mostly in summer it's 6 or 7. Though it does stay that strength for a few hours since the day length is up to 16 hours 38 mins in June. A UV index of 9 is extremely rare.

By comparison, I'm as far south as you can go on the western side of Australia and around June 21st on a clear day can have peak UV of around 2, and Ive seen the index get to 15 in January. Every day (when it's not cloudy) is around 8, 9 now, with the odd 10 or 11. Today is 10.9. The sun bites here. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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It got to a sunny 27.7C here today then the easterlies went mental bringing down small branches and debris. At sun down it’s calmed down but the black clouds are back as we descend into winter again by Friday. Some forecasts are saying 12C and heavy rain. Ahhhh spring. The season that gives you everything from the other 3 seasons. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

It got to a sunny 27.7C here today then the easterlies went mental bringing down small branches and debris. At sun down it’s calmed down but the black clouds are back as we descend into winter again by Friday. Some forecasts are saying 12C and heavy rain. Ahhhh spring. The season that gives you everything from the other 3 seasons. 

A high of 12C in mid-November is awful for you guys at 35S. That would be the equivalent of us having 12C in mid-May, which would be awful for us here at 51N even. The lowest daytime max for me in May this year was 15.7C and I’m 16 degrees further away from the equator.

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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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13 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

A high of 12C in mid-November is awful for you guys at 35S. That would be the equivalent of us having 12C in mid-May, which would be awful for us here at 51N even. The lowest daytime max for me in May this year was 15.7C and I’m 16 degrees further away from the equator.

2022 was the year that broke spring here in the southern coastal part of WA. We’ve had every other season this spring, but mostly winter this year. Officially we are going for 14C tomorrow with thunderstorms and about 15mm of rain. Perth is going for 17C with about the same amount of rain. Both temps are frigid for both locations for November, let alone the second half of November. Having lived in Perth for decades before, you never got a max lower than 20C in November. That would be a noteworthy event for me because I’ve been growing palms and watching the weather like a hawk for decades, and it’s the time of year that you are just wanting it to warm up and make things grow. It’s really weird. I wonder if we will get snow on the Stirling Ranges. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Tyrone said:

2022 was the year that broke spring here in the southern coastal part of WA. We’ve had every other season this spring, but mostly winter this year. Officially we are going for 14C tomorrow with thunderstorms and about 15mm of rain. Perth is going for 17C with about the same amount of rain. Both temps are frigid for both locations for November, let alone the second half of November. Having lived in Perth for decades before, you never got a max lower than 20C in November. That would be a noteworthy event for me because I’ve been growing palms and watching the weather like a hawk for decades, and it’s the time of year that you are just wanting it to warm up and make things grow. It’s really weird. I wonder if we will get snow on the Stirling Ranges. 

Sounds similar to the awful weather during the spring on 2021 in Europe.

Edited by Foxpalms
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Got to 20C yesterday with some sun and very strong and gusty winds from the west this time. Going for 14C today and rain.

Was just reading of a very strong Antarctic polar vortex this year possibly created by that Tongan under sea volcano exploding and punching huge amounts of moisture into the stratosphere back in January. The stratosphere is normally bone dry, but the volcano blast upped the moisture content in the stratosphere in the Southern Hemisphere by 10%. They reckon this is reflecting heat back into space and now this cooler air is descending into the troposphere and affecting the weather. It’s sending supercooled air into the cold fronts that come along drawing in cool air from Antarctica. It makes sense to me. 

On another note I’m sick of hearing from the eastern states centric BOM and other weather media outlets how “dry” we are getting it in the west vs how wet it is in the east. It is wet in the east, that’s for sure, and it’s probably dry in the Pilbara, but it isnt dry or below average rainfall everywhere in WA. The rain just won’t stop here and we are definitely not below average rainfall here, this year, last year or the year before that.  The weather media will differentiate between Victoria, NSW, QLD, southern NSW, central NSW, northern rivers NSW, southern QLD, far north QLD etc etc, but I read an article today that just lumped WA into one category and said we are all below average rain and dry over here. Well the reality is wheat farmers can’t harvest because it’s raining so much and many have already claimed insurance for wheat that’s reshot in the head. Their crops are ruined because of the wet. It all grew spectacularly due to the good rains but they haven’t stopped. The longer it goes on the more will be ruined. Compared to the multiple disasters in the east, it is almost insignificant, but to lump WA a state with latitudes from 35S to about 15S into one category and then say it’s dry is crazy. I wish it would dry out. 

Rant over. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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This was taken this morning. It’s nearly summer and the lake level isn’t dropping yet. It normally would start to drop by now. 

A6B9AB46-1FE0-45A5-8DCF-B9F687123D4C.jpeg

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Along the lines of the Tonga eruption and climate effects. Not sure exactly how accurate the science is in this video but it makes some interesting food for thought re the unusual weather down under this year and how the la nina effects have been exaggerated even further.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EZtRKbTdQVw&feature=youtu.be#bottom-sheet

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1 hour ago, Phil Petersen said:

Along the lines of the Tonga eruption and climate effects. Not sure exactly how accurate the science is in this video but it makes some interesting food for thought re the unusual weather down under this year and how the la nina effects have been exaggerated even further.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EZtRKbTdQVw&feature=youtu.be#bottom-sheet

Just watched the video and it was good. However how they explain it all, works well for the east of the country but not the west. We are in a positive SAM that is strongly positive due to the eruption of water into the stratosphere which according to the science pushes the cold fronts way south away from Australia. That should then make the west of the country, dry, warm and sunny. However we are getting cold front after cold front with frigid air coming up from Antarctica that should technically be held down south due to the strong polar vortex. So I don’t know. These models paint the east wet, west dry picture, but unless you are talking about the Pilbara or inland Murchison areas which are essentially desert areas anyway, the west is far from a drought infested dry place. The wheatbelt is a soggy mess, we’ve had our annual rainfall already, I can’t drive on my lawn without getting bogged. I wish we were drier and sunnier. At the moment we are stuck in winter, and I’ve got the fire raging while it’s freezing cold for November out there and pelting with more rain. My ten day accumulated rain forecasts are identical to the east coast totals at the moment on windy.com. I haven’t needed to water my landscape at all yet and being this close to summer it’s unprecedented for my garden. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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48 minutes ago, PalmCode said:

Just had one of the heaviest downpours of rain here I think I've ever seen. It only lasted about 10 minutes, luckily. 

The northern part of Auckland looks like it had a serious dumping according to the radar.

NZ looks like it will be wet in the next ten days, while the east coast of Australia looks like it will dry up a bit. That wet weather is probably going to cross the Tasman then. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Tyrone said:

Just watched the video and it was good. However how they explain it all, works well for the east of the country but not the west. We are in a positive SAM that is strongly positive due to the eruption of water into the stratosphere which according to the science pushes the cold fronts way south away from Australia. That should then make the west of the country, dry, warm and sunny. However we are getting cold front after cold front with frigid air coming up from Antarctica that should technically be held down south due to the strong polar vortex. So I don’t know. These models paint the east wet, west dry picture, but unless you are talking about the Pilbara or inland Murchison areas which are essentially desert areas anyway, the west is far from a drought infested dry place. The wheatbelt is a soggy mess, we’ve had our annual rainfall already, I can’t drive on my lawn without getting bogged. I wish we were drier and sunnier. At the moment we are stuck in winter, and I’ve got the fire raging while it’s freezing cold for November out there and pelting with more rain. My ten day accumulated rain forecasts are identical to the east coast totals at the moment on windy.com. I haven’t needed to water my landscape at all yet and being this close to summer it’s unprecedented for my garden. 

I here you Tyrone. While it hasn't been extraordinarily wet up here compared to where you are (and yesterday's rain was heavy and sustained enough that it was actually useful), it feels awfully like May here and not November - I got home from work an hour ago, and it just feels cool and dark and like the days are gradually getting darker not longer. I remember in 2005 we had a very cool spring that ran into the coolest December on record (for the Mt Lawley station - 23.something from memory, 3 degrees cooler than the previous record). I don't know what the reason for that long cold spell was, but when the jaracarands just struggle to flower at all and the winter weeds all get a second go, you know something's wrong. Even October up here felt cool - it was only 1.5 degs below the mean temperature-wise, but the frequent strong southerlies made it feel like winter. I've left the tent on my coconut (which seems fine), and if it suddenly gets summery it's going to feel weird, and almost out of place. Weatherzone has one of their little stories on their website that talks about the volcano and the stratosphere and an unusually strong polar vortex... was this the story you read?

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On 11/17/2022 at 4:56 AM, Foxpalms said:

Sounds similar to the awful weather during the spring on 2021 in Europe.

Yes, reading Tyrone's comments, it does sound eerily similar to the 2021 cold spell that we had. That started off in January with a pretty cold 2nd half of winter. I had a few days that didn't even recover above freezing here, even if there wasn't any extreme cold nights. Then I had a freak 26C day in March, however April and May were almost the coldest on record after that. It was a really bad spring in general. My latest ever frost that I have recorded and my wettest May too I believe. That summer was also crap too as well and struggled to get going. Both cool and wet. No proper heat. Easily the worst summer in a decade. Not to say the same will happen down under.

I think we had about 8-9 consecutive months with below average temps from Jan - September 2021. A huge contrast to this year, where we are now seeing 15 consecutive months of above average temps. I blame La Nina. This year we are in a triple dip and it is nowhere near as strong as last year, with many SST profiles now neutral or El Nino like almost. When La Nina does end, probably in the next month or two, it is going to be interesting. A switch to El Nino may cause severe heat and drought in Europe again next year. I wouldn't be surprised if you guys in Australia see your hottest period in March as El Nino is flaring up, especially if summer is delayed this year. Again you can blame the triple dip La Nina. Maybe Tonga eruption has a bit to do with it as well.

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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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14 hours ago, michael said:

I here you Tyrone. While it hasn't been extraordinarily wet up here compared to where you are (and yesterday's rain was heavy and sustained enough that it was actually useful), it feels awfully like May here and not November - I got home from work an hour ago, and it just feels cool and dark and like the days are gradually getting darker not longer. I remember in 2005 we had a very cool spring that ran into the coolest December on record (for the Mt Lawley station - 23.something from memory, 3 degrees cooler than the previous record). I don't know what the reason for that long cold spell was, but when the jaracarands just struggle to flower at all and the winter weeds all get a second go, you know something's wrong. Even October up here felt cool - it was only 1.5 degs below the mean temperature-wise, but the frequent strong southerlies made it feel like winter. I've left the tent on my coconut (which seems fine), and if it suddenly gets summery it's going to feel weird, and almost out of place. Weatherzone has one of their little stories on their website that talks about the volcano and the stratosphere and an unusually strong polar vortex... was this the story you read?

Hi Michael. Yes I remember that cool year. I think January 2006 averaged something like 27C max and the whole summer never saw a max above 37C, which now living in Albany sounds warm to me. I think we are going for a similar summer this year, if we get summer. Yes the story I was referring too was the Weatherzone one. Phil posted a YouTube one as well which was interesting. If we do get a cool summer that actually will be good for the Perth growing season as the peak heat in Perth can be just brutal. It’s just been a very slow and prolonged warm up this year. I think our average max in November has maybe just inched past the September average max now. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Been pretty soggy here. Not cold, but incessant drizzle and fog for the last 2-3 days with light north eastery winds.  Finally getting some sun this afternoon for a few hours atleast and it felt burning hot. Everything is soaked, but the chathams nikau seem to be speeding up growth and have opened their first spear earlier than I thought. 

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It got to a sunny but windy 17.8C today. Tomorrow is 21C, then 26C on Wednesday. Now if I can finally get rid of Covid by then, Wednesday will be a nice day. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Tyrone said:

It got to a sunny but windy 17.8C today. Tomorrow is 21C, then 26C on Wednesday. Now if I can finally get rid of Covid by then, Wednesday will be a nice day. 

Commiserations. Still waiting for my luck to run out with that one despite known close exposure in the past month.

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I guess prefer this to going straight into dry before Christmass but don't need any more rain here at the moment. Another storm warning out for later today. At least it's been somewhat warm and so things growing well.  The last visible evidence of the freak October freeze has gone now.

Edited by cbmnz
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35 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

Commiserations. Still waiting for my luck to run out with that one despite known close exposure in the past month.

We’ve had a wave come through the community down here, fueled by general indifference to Covid.

Hopefully the weather improves.

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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33 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

I guess prefer this to going straight into dry before Christmass but don't need any more rain here at the moment. Another storm warning out for later today. At least it's been somewhat warm and so things growing well.  The last visible evidence of the freak October freeze has gone now.

My gingers have almost completely recovered from the July extreme freeze we had here. Other things will take longer though. Looking forward to warmer weather and hopefully a good growing season without extremes. I don’t want anything over 40C this year. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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After a light sprinkle last night we are going for 27C then afternoon thunderstorms. Humidity and dewpoints have been quite high too. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Well what a difference to yesterday it is today. I feel like I’m in Mackay in North QLD. It peaked at 30.2C with dewpoints just above 20C with clouds and thunderstorms moving in. Very still too. I’m not used to this. Yesterday was a shade over 20C and I thought that was alright. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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16 hours ago, Tyrone said:

Well what a difference to yesterday it is today. I feel like I’m in Mackay in North QLD. It peaked at 30.2C with dewpoints just above 20C with clouds and thunderstorms moving in. Very still too. I’m not used to this. Yesterday was a shade over 20C and I thought that was alright. 

Looks like the SW from Southern Ocean may finally be banished to South of your lat. Ended up getting 60mm on Tuesday with more rain yesterday and again this morning gutters have been overflowing. This can stop now. Have family that have crops in the ground, that are in danger of being drowned. Only good thing is that with the high sun and long days it will dry out soon enough.

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Today it’s drizzling again with a light breeze from the SW. At around 9.45am it’s 17.3C and 95% RH. Like being in a moist cloud. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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5 hours ago, cbmnz said:

Looks like the SW from Southern Ocean may finally be banished to South of your lat. Ended up getting 60mm on Tuesday with more rain yesterday and again this morning gutters have been overflowing. This can stop now. Have family that have crops in the ground, that are in danger of being drowned. Only good thing is that with the high sun and long days it will dry out soon enough.

What sort of crops are grown in your area?

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, cbmnz said:

In this case it's maize, a cattle feed optimised strain of corn. Dominates the summer crops grown locally.

We had the exact opposite issue this year. I can't remember whether I posted any pictures, but the maize in my local fields only grew to half its normal size and did not set cobs properly. Likely a consequence of the summer drought and the exceptionally dry period up to September, where only 7 inches of rain fell across 9 months, combined with 40C temps in July.

There was just no moisture left in the ground come June/July. A severe lack of insects too for pollination. Lots of the maize died from the drought and the stuff that did survive wasn't worth harvesting, so it was just left there come late October / early November. Now those very same fields are flooded out and waterlogged due to all the rain this month. We've had 7 inches in the past 3 weeks alone. Some places not far from me have had 13 inches of rain this month!

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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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6 hours ago, cbmnz said:

In this case it's maize, a cattle feed optimised strain of corn. Dominates the summer crops grown locally.

The fields would look very green with all that maize growing. 

Around my area it’s just pasture land for sheep and cattle, mainly sheep. A bit further inland it’s canola in winter which looks nice when it flowers with the fields turning yellow, and about 50-60kms inland it’s wheat, barley, oats etc. It’s too moist down here for wheat. 

Im looking forward to my NZ trip next year. 

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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19 hours ago, Tyrone said:

The fields would look very green with all that maize growing. 

Around my area it’s just pasture land for sheep and cattle, mainly sheep. A bit further inland it’s canola in winter which looks nice when it flowers with the fields turning yellow, and about 50-60kms inland it’s wheat, barley, oats etc. It’s too moist down here for wheat. 

Im looking forward to my NZ trip next year. 

Same here, much too moist for wheat although some of the last few Summers it would have grown well.  The maize was the only thing green by Feb/March 2020, still a shock to see drone footage from then. Maybe this will be a green summer right through like last seen 2017/2018, though prob jumping the gun saying that when summer hasn't even officially started yet.

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The BOM has forecast a cooler and wetter than average December for southern WA. After that it appears summer shifts up a gear and January thru to March is expected to be above average in temp but with average rain.

The good news is we are now in a drying trend. This week we will see peak temps around 26C and the 10 day accumulated forecast rainfall is a meagre 5.4mm. It’s good to see the sun out too a bit more. 

Ive just started irrigating parts of the landscape but there are some areas I will hold off until they dry out as they’re still soaking wet. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Perth is going for 37C tomorrow and is the hottest southern capital so far this season. Down here will be a mild but sunny 22C. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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