Jump to content
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

Philodendrons


piping plovers

Recommended Posts

I have not found a thread on here for philodendrons (or aroids other than anthuriums) so am adding this post.

I’ve been reading that Philodendron patriciae is one of the most attractive “strap leaf” philodendrons.  Not sure if considered a strap leaf but the mature specimens remind me of my favorite strap leaf anthuriums. I got one from ecuagenera USA.  My first order from their US location and I like that they ship in pot; not bare root.  Process orders in 48 hrs.  Very good price for the size they shipped.

9A0E8E3E-BC87-4E5B-B331-7821EB1B9346.thumb.jpeg.415986c56c5c181d64cd081620933f4c.jpeg
 

A1957AFE-2801-490D-AEC4-0ECC794EDA7D.thumb.jpeg.f4534a158d6f5195307eddcf38c5383b.jpeg

 

Edited by piping plovers
Spelling
  • Like 5
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome. I really need to find a sugar mama so I can get a bigger place with more room for plants. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, JohnAndSancho said:

I really need to find a sugar mama so I can get a bigger place with more room for plants. 

LOL.  I hear you there! Dreading the first frost in mid October when I gotta drag all these plants indoors.  Been paying a commercial greenhouse past few years to store many of my tropicals over the winter.  Until I build a greenhouse.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

P. patriciae is one of my favs for sure. Give it something to climb on in order to get the long leaves. Here's an older one in my garden with me and a "famous" Japanese collector/grower who was here last week - Kunzo.2108782885_IMG_66642.thumb.JPG.4e6cb8941c4aac95fd257a6c3a633b0a.JPG

  • Like 11
  • Upvote 3

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And if you like pendant leaves - don't forget the Anthuriums. Here's A. morona with longest leaves at least 6 ft. long.539944137_IMG_66652.thumb.JPG.e4c5ae9e8e0d1d9e642b2515128a2718.JPG

  • Like 9
  • Upvote 1

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Dypsisdean said:

 

P. patriciae is one of my favs for sure. Give it something to climb on in order to get the long leaves. Here's an older one in my garden with me and a "famous" Japanese collector/grower who was here last week - Kunzo.

 

Impressive specimen!  And Kona, what great growing conditions.  I’m keeping this photo for inspiration for my little guy:)

Thanks for the horticultural advice on the supporting pole; I’ll plan for that.

Not sure if your guest was featured on any YouTube videos lately but he reminds me of a Japanese gentleman who was walking through and speaking to the host about his amazing aroid collection; very interesting video. 

12 hours ago, Dypsisdean said:

Here's A. morona with longest leaves at least 6 ft. long.

Thanks also for this anthurium suggestion.  Beautiful plant.  I’ll look for one.  I now have A. pallidiflorum, wendlingeri and vitariifolium growing in my sunroom in New England.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Not sure if your guest was featured on any YouTube videos lately but he reminds me of a Japanese gentleman who was walking through and speaking to the host about his amazing aroid collection; very interesting video. 

Yes Kunzo has several videos featuring his out of control greenhouses in Osaka (Kobe actually) filled with all kinds of neat plants. He is quite the character. Search YouTube for Kunzo and they will come up.

  • Like 1

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the photos!

Funny that I am reading this now when tomorrow I will drive to get three Ecuagenera plants (including a P. patriciae) from a pop up event in Puerto Rico.
 

Saving lots on shipping and hoping less stressed plants too.

Amazing plants Dean, and can’t wait to see them in October at the Biennial! 

 

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Cindy Adair

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

8 minutes ago, Cindy Adair said:

Funny that I am reading this now when tomorrow I will drive to get three Ecuagenera plants (including a P. patriciae) from a pop up event in Puerto Rico.

Ahh, wonderful.  I’m sure you will be able to grow a beautiful specimen in your tropical location!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love Philos. I had a patriciae years ago (pictured here) but lost it when my greenhouse froze due to a heater failure during what we commonly call the Great 2010 Arctic Freeze here...a 10+ night run (depending on exactly where you lived at the tome) of unprecedented 18-20 F temps at night (the ground actually FROZE) with a rise only to about 40-45 during the day. The heater failure resulted in the loss of easily 1/2 my plant collection, among it the patriciae. I have yet to replace it.

july09 092.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But I love Philos and have a lot of them, about 80 different plants

Queen Victoria

barrosoanum

Verrucosum, standard form

warszewickii

Painted Lady

Golden erubescens

gloriosum

fullsizeoutput_41ea.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_421a.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_18d8.jpeg

IMG_0163.JPG

fullsizeoutput_220b.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_11f1.jpeg

glorio.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Cindy Adair said:

I love the photos!

Funny that I am reading this now when tomorrow I will drive to get three Ecuagenera plants (including a P. patriciae) from a pop up event in Puerto Rico.
 

Saving lots on shipping and hoping less stressed plants too.

Amazing plants Dean, and can’t wait to see them in October at the Biennial! 

 

Cindy - your location couldn't be any better for many of these aroids. They will explode for you.

Get ready for many ideas during your Biennial visit. Looking forward to it.

  • Like 2

animated-volcano-image-0010.gif.71ccc48bfc1ec622a0adca187eabaaa4.gif

Kona, on The Big Island
Hawaii - Land of Volcanoes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, metalfan said:

 

I love Philos. I had a patriciae years ago (pictured here) but lost it when my greenhouse froze due to a heater failure during what we commonly call the Great 2010 Arctic Freeze here...a 10+ night run (depending on exactly where you lived at the tome) of unprecedented 18-20 F temps at night (the ground actually FROZE) with a rise only to about 40-45 during the day. The heater failure resulted in the loss of easily 1/2 my plant collection, among it the patriciae. I have yet to replace it.

 

Well grown collection, the verrucosum is especially nice.  I knew you’d have these in your jungle greenhouse.  Hopefully you will find another patriciae soon.

I remember you shared before about that devastating freeze to your collection.  I actually was visiting Florida right after the freeze and was astounded that even at the southernmost entrance to the Everglades in SW FL (Ten Thousand Islands Area) , the coconut palms had severe freeze burn even along the water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I am really not certain why the February freeze was so severe. It was only 2 nights in the mid-20's. But it was more devastating than a lot of freezes that were both colder and lasted more than 2 nights. I think it was because the cold lasted for so long each night. Usually here it will dip to the 20's for a couple hours before dawn, like maybe 2-3, then boom sun comes up and its back over 32. These 2 nights the 20's lasted for 12+ hours.

I think people in the South of Florida (not to cast aspersions on ya'll) believe that they cannot be touched by cold, ever. But historically there have been some humdingers of a freeze as far as Homestead in my lifetime. I remember as a 15 year old in 1975 watching the news when I lived in South Texas and seeing that Miami was losing the citrus crop to hard freeze which in my town it was still in the 50's at night. Since moving to FL, I have been told that in the 1980's there was a devastating freeze statewide. A friend of mine in Sarasota has a photo of snow in yer yard from that freeze.

I have over 60 different philodendrons in my collection. I love them. They grow easily, and make such striking plantings

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are great plants. I think they need to be in a garden to complete/compliment, but I don't see them as a feature plant. Having said that, there is always an exception-without exception! 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/21/2022 at 8:16 AM, metalfan said:

Yes, I am really not certain why the February freeze was so severe. It was only 2 nights in the mid-20's. But it was more devastating than a lot of freezes that were both colder and lasted more than 2 nights. I think it was because the cold lasted for so long each night. Usually here it will dip to the 20's for a couple hours before dawn, like maybe 2-3, then boom sun comes up and its back over 32. These 2 nights the 20's lasted for 12+ hours.

It was the coldest I've recorded, but I have only had a data collection system for ~3 years.  The 2009 freeze was worse in terms of Philodendron Selloum (or whatever bipindfkdjkfjdi they are calling it now) and that one torched them 90% to the ground.  This freeze had frost 3 nights in a row (mild on Friday night) and barely got into the 50s on Saturday and just touched 60 on Sunday.  A lot of plants were fine with our typical 1 hour blast to the upper 20s, but they did not like 4 hours in the mid 20s.  I've posted this log elsewhere:

266750528_January2022brutalcoldweekend.thumb.png.9ec0e7791fe1ee5c4c5b5094270ca656.png

I recorded snow in my front yard on 1/10/2010...I have it on video for proof!  :D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

24 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

It was the coldest I've recorded, but I have only had a data collection system for ~3 years.  The 2009 freeze was worse in terms of Philodendron Selloum (or whatever bipindfkdjkfjdi they are calling it now)

Lol, I agree with your frustration on renaming the selloum.  And I’ll always call it by its old name .

I know we’re talking philodendrons here, and I’m going off path, but I’m still wondering if that Florida freeze took out the coco de mer, (Lodoicea maldivica) specimen growing in Flamingo Gardens , Davie, FL at around that time. I remember that around 2012 when I visited, the prominent and featured palm just disappeared; even as a seedling- a little too big for someone to slip this Jurassic -sized baby into their pocket ;) 

 

here is the last photo I have for it:

2F379E78-615F-418C-8D48-17AD5DD3F4C2.thumb.jpeg.69898643f17eddfefb123979048f4b7a.jpeg

Edited by piping plovers
Photo
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone ID this one?  I planted it at the base of a tree a few years back, but don't know what kind it is.

IMG_20220828_120152.jpg.81292d9bbab176cd9b9fd035818cb651.jpg

 

IMG_20220828_120208.jpg.f291156a011a42164f1d134b9b3b227b.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went on a plant road trip with friends yesterday. We went to visit a collector in Central FL, swung by Ecuagenera, and went by EFG Orchids. I was able to replace 2 plants I lost in 2010 during the Great Greenhouse Heater Failure Debacle that I have been wanting to replace but have not wanted to pay the price....Philo serpens and Philo patriciae.

I had them both prior to 2010 and lost them both to that freeze. And when Ecuagenera first started getting the serpens it was astronomically expensive (at least to ME...$250-275). But I was able to get one for $60 yesterday, a very nice specimen.

And the Philodendron patriciae they had on sale for $120. This is really not all that expensive when you consider I paid $75 for my first one back in mid-2000's, I got it from Enid at NSE back in the day and it was THE most expensive plant I had ever bought at $75. SO the sale price on this one was not that much of a mare up relatively speaking from the original.

fullsizeoutput_513b.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_5148.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_513d.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_5158.jpeg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Merlyn said:

@greysrigging what is the climbing one with the semi-serrated edges? 

Not sure of the name, just called 'common' Philodendron in Darwin.
The climber at the bottom of the trunk is a native Pothos called epipremnum amplissimum
 

301035760_3228871707357885_2607352502970972584_n.jpg.d36518e2d9696df61b1a797a1e84e440.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Planted a little Philodendron mamei today bought at the Aibonito Flower festival in Puerto Rico.
 

Hope it will climb up the adjacent tree fern trunk.

4C1D24B2-3A3D-4FA0-A22B-C6232C2A8C8E.thumb.jpeg.077007d6c64f9e3169b7ce4e92df74a1.jpeg

  • Like 2

Cindy Adair

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cindy mamei has always been one of my favorites!

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/28/2022 at 8:58 PM, Merlyn said:

@miamicuse it looks similar to one sold as Burle Marx.  The leaf shape is a bit different, though.  

I ran into another one of these at a local nursery recently, they call it Philodendrons red emerald.  So I bought a second one and put that under another tree.

IMG_20220831_181051.jpg.7509ad583a4e19049b0159ed2bd8df6e.jpg

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't know when I got this Ghost in a trade it was going to be a mint ghost

fullsizeoutput_2e65.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_2e66.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_2230.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_1a9a.jpeg

  • Like 2

"You can't see California without Marlon Brando's eyes"---SliPknot

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/29/2022 at 6:41 PM, Cindy Adair said:

Planted a little Philodendron mamei today bought at the Aibonito Flower festival in Puerto Rico.
 

Hope it will climb up the adjacent tree fern trunk.

4C1D24B2-3A3D-4FA0-A22B-C6232C2A8C8E.thumb.jpeg.077007d6c64f9e3169b7ce4e92df74a1.jpeg

Hi Cindy, I don't have a P. mamei but do have P. plowmanii and P. pastazanum which are similar.  If P. mamei behaves like the two I have, it will not climb but rather creep along the ground making an impressive ground cover.  

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Ray! I read that P. mamei was initially described as terrestrial, but now others say it grows several feet up trees.

I have no idea, but will update here when I see where it chooses to go!

I’d love to see photos of yours as I don’t have either of them.

Cindy Adair

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, miamicuse said:

I ran into another one of these at a local nursery recently, they call it Philodendrons red emerald.  So I bought a second one and put that under another tree.

I like that one!  It is definitely not Burle Marx.  The leaves are about 50% bigger and with a reddish emergent leaf.  Here's my Burle Marx that has finally started climbing my Queen palm:

1748469441_P1090873BurleMarx.thumb.JPG.934274896e01deceb0d226e9e8a97f48.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Finally got a P. Spiritus Sancti.  I know the prices on these even up until several months ago were crazy $$ even for seedlings.  Seems like the market is reacting and more supply is becoming available.
 

Watched An interesting YouTube video on a USA grower who was the 2nd? Known grower to pollinate, get seeds and grow on.  He is offering at reasonable market rate prices; I would have purchased from him but was temporarily out of stock.  I bought from an Etsy grower in Ecuador and was really happy with quality and shipping.

For anyone looking for these I noticed Ecuagenera has seedlings for sale at relatively reasonable prices, similar to what Anthurium luxurians was going for last year.  Pricey but market rate.

810C6BFE-8500-4290-9410-EC1C9A872866.thumb.jpeg.a19e315094141f6e3fb79233b0b1ad81.jpeg

17F33C35-15B7-40F7-9507-A629ED6E70A5.thumb.jpeg.1b876fa198ba29e2b09fb9f49a859818.jpeg

Edited by piping plovers
Correction
  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have philodendron-philia (my new word for someone who suffers from love of philodendrons).  Here in Sacramento, we can grow Thaumatophyllum bipinnatifidum, also known as Philodendron selloum or P. bipinnatifidum, outdoors with a bit of overhead protection, which also keeps the direct sun off of the leaves.  I have a neighbor, a landscape designer, who grows P.  X evansii as a massive plant.  I've been meaning to ask him for a piece of it to propagate, as I have never seen this available for anything approaching an affordable price.  

Monstera deliciosa grows outdoors here under good overhead protection.  Mine was getting only one new leaf per year, and losing one every year or two, so slow growth.  But this year it got two leaves, each about 1.5 feet in diameter, so starting to look good.  The stem is now about two and one half inches wide.  

I've been wondering if Thamatophyllum stenolobum might show some cold tolerance.  I just got one on sale for only $24, so I'm excited!

It will be nice when the aroid craze dies down a bit and we can get back to reasonable prices for them.  I remember when I purchased a Philodendron patriciae for about $20, not so very long ago.

 

Bruce

 

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Finally got a P. Spiritus Sancti.  I know the prices on these even up until several months ago were crazy $$ even for seedlings.  Seems like the market is reacting and more supply is becoming available.
 

Watched An interesting YouTube video on a USA grower who was the 2nd? Known grower to pollinate, get seeds and grow on.  He is offering at reasonable market rate prices; I would have purchased from him but was temporarily out of stock.  I bought from an Etsy grower in Ecuador and was really happy with quality and shipping.

For anyone looking for these I noticed Ecuagenera has seedlings for sale at relatively reasonable prices, similar to what Anthurium luxurians was going for last year.  Pricey but market rate.

810C6BFE-8500-4290-9410-EC1C9A872866.thumb.jpeg.a19e315094141f6e3fb79233b0b1ad81.jpeg

17F33C35-15B7-40F7-9507-A629ED6E70A5.thumb.jpeg.1b876fa198ba29e2b09fb9f49a859818.jpeg

I've seen smaller plants than that went on ebay for $10,000+ not too long ago, so if these can now be obtained for $350, perhaps the aroid bubble is finally bursting, just as the Dutch tulip bubble did. No reason why plants that can be vegetatively propagated relatively easily should have such silly prices. I'm not particularly aroid-obessed, but I've certainly nothing against them, but the high prices have put me off. Very interested to know how you get on with your spiritu sancti.

I understand that they're a bit fussy, so good luck with it!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, PalmsandLiszt said:

I've seen smaller plants than that went on ebay for $10,000+ not too long ago, so if these can now be obtained for $350, perhaps the aroid bubble is finally bursting, just as the Dutch tulip bubble did. No reason why plants that can be vegetatively propagated relatively easily should have such silly prices. I'm not particularly aroid-obessed, but I've certainly nothing against them, but the high prices have put me off. Very interested to know how you get on with your spiritu sancti.

I understand that they're a bit fussy, so good luck with it!

Thanks 😊 will keep you all posted on its progress.

Yes, I agree with you on the $$mania, if we get a recession like we keep hearing about will be interesting to see if the mania evaporates, for awhile at least.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, PalmsandLiszt said:

 

I understand that they're a bit fussy, so good luck with it!

What I've found important in caring for spiritus sancti is never bend or break their roots.  If a root is bent, it will die and sometimes the whole plant dies. Unfortunately I'm speaking from experience.  So, it's important as they're growing to guide the roots within the pot rather than letting them attach to the bench or something else outside the pot that will make it difficult to step the plant up into a larger pot when the time comes.

Attached is a photo of a survivor.  I'm also growing out some seedlings and am learning they like to live on the drier side.

 

Philo ss.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, PalmsandLiszt said:

I've seen smaller plants than that went on ebay for $10,000+ not too long ago, so if these can now be obtained for $350, perhaps the aroid bubble is finally bursting, just as the Dutch tulip bubble did. No reason why plants that can be vegetatively propagated relatively easily should have such silly prices. I'm not particularly aroid-obessed, but I've certainly nothing against them, but the high prices have put me off. Very interested to know how you get on with your spiritu sancti.

I understand that they're a bit fussy, so good luck with it!

tissue cultured spiritus sancti flooded the market about a year ago so that's why the price tanked. The only things retaining value somewhat are the chimeric variegated aroids (especially novel mutations). 

  • Like 3

Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Marie Nock said:

What I've found important in caring for spiritus sancti is never bend or break their roots.  If a root is bent, it will die and sometimes the whole plant dies. Unfortunately I'm speaking from experience.  So

Thank you Marie for sharing that cultural advice and experience. I’ll be sure to heed that.  Btw, Beautifully grown specimen! How long did it take to get that size?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...