Jump to content
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

So What Caught Your Eye Today?


The Gerg

Recommended Posts

15 minutes ago, realarch said:

Hey Brad, yup, the mottling is normal and an attractive trait.

Tim

Reminds me of some bamboo species I used to grow, desirable for that trait - thanks for the info Tim. 

BTW any idea what my dark bumpy  palm above is, is it a Veitchia?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brad, looks like V. arecina to me. The color and patterns on V. arecina are so much nicer than V. joannis, IMO, but I do love those droopy leaves on the later. Veitchia vitiensis is my absolute favorite though.

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, realarch said:

Brad, looks like V. arecina to me. The color and patterns on V. arecina are so much nicer than V. joannis, IMO, but I do love those droopy leaves on the later. Veitchia vitiensis is my absolute favorite though.

Tim

Thanks Tim!  Sorry for hijacking the what caught your eye thread folks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had formed the impression that my Itaya was very slow growing, now 3 years from a small pot but about a month ago I discovered that it was barely in the ground.  Today it caught my eye that it seems to be forgiving me for not fixing it sooner.

06DA8EF5-13F6-42E3-9575-D19A93A62C4E.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

I made a short stroll through the garden and found this flowering J. altifrons....

ja001.thumb.jpg.bc3d23645be6c26564de5ff42b70b9bb.jpg

😜

The Hibiscus flower dropped right into the young palm...

 

Lars

 

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking of Hibiscus...

My Hibiscus tiliaceus (Talipariti tiliacea) is loaded with buds and has been busting out with these beautiful blossoms the last few days. What a great tree for the Palm Springs area...it always looks wonderful, happy with its big, glossy leaves, never bothered by sizzling (123F) summer heat/sun, nor from temps down toward the freezing mark. Never blanches in the heat, never yellows or purples (anthocyanins) in the cold. Just a beautiful, wonderful thing to my eyes, and I'm oh so glad I planted it. 

image.thumb.jpeg.8fd8c7273b33c2b03d625b6821e58520.jpeg

And an honorable mention...Bauhinia x Blakeana making a very nice mid-winter show as well!

image.thumb.jpeg.fa0f45a75e54db92c7b7d1e5624cd2f7.jpeg

 

  • Like 10

Michael Norell

Rancho Mirage, California | 33°44' N 116°25' W | 287 ft | z10a | avg Jan 43/70F | Jul 78/108F avg | Weather Station KCARANCH310

previously Big Pine Key, Florida | 24°40' N 81°21' W | 4.5 ft. | z12a | Calcareous substrate | avg annual min. approx 52F | avg Jan 65/75F | Jul 83/90 | extreme min approx 41F

previously Natchez, Mississippi | 31°33' N 91°24' W | 220 ft.| z9a | Downtown/river-adjacent | Loess substrate | avg annual min. 23F | Jan 43/61F | Jul 73/93F | extreme min 2.5F (1899); previously Los Angeles, California (multiple locations)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It has been warm here and I have been out watering and picking up debris from the Santa Ana winds that blow everything around. I hadn’t noticed before but the ground orchid is coming up early this year. 

IMG_3665.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After the morning rain, these tiny palms are looking pretty sweet!

From top to bottom: Pinanga sp, Calyptrocalyx pachystachys, variegated Areca cathecu, Licuala thoana, Licuala maculata (or Lanonia dasyantha?), and a not-so-variegated Licuala grandis. 

IMG_2524.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What catches your eye? The pinnate leaves of Dypsis and Pinanga, or the palmate leaves of Licuala and Joey?

IMG_2457.jpeg

  • Like 7
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Okkidoggi said:

What catches your eye? The pinnate leaves of Dypsis and Pinanga, or the palmate leaves of Licuala and Joey?

IMG_2457.jpeg

✓ Licuala et Joey

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saw this coming home this evening, while sitting at the red light I look up and see this.

20240202_172449.jpg

20240202_172446.jpg

  • Like 15
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Areca catechu seeding again. Shocking for my zone.

IMG_2062.jpg

  • Like 10
  • Upvote 1

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well not actually today, but yesterday afternoon before the storm arrived,  this no ID Pritchardia species was really catching my attention.  It is getting very full and the trunk has significant girth.  It was planted in an elevated narrow long brick planter which I hope continues to contain it as it grows. 

20240204-BH3I3115.jpg

  • Like 8
  • Upvote 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Socratea exorrhiza, emergent stilt root. 

Tim

IMG_7284.jpeg

IMG_7290.jpeg

  • Like 18
  • Upvote 3

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Tracy said:

this no ID Pritchardia species was really catching my attention.  It is getting very full and the trunk has significant girth.  It was planted in an elevated narrow long brick planter which I hope continues to contain it as it grows. 

Beautiful, Tracy. Looking like Chambeyronia oliviformis to the right of the Pritchardia? More or less how much space did you leave between the two? My guess is ~6'. I've always admired your big one on the Ashbury side but don't recall noticing the other one until seeing this photo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Billy said:

More or less how much space did you leave between the two? My guess is ~6'. 

I think that sounds right Billy, but when the rain stops I'll check and send you a pm.  I have a third C. oliviformis adjacent to the walkway on Kurt & Mary's side too.  They are a great grower that stays contained in its air space well, which is why I added the other two years after planting the one along Ashbury.

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, realarch said:

Socratea exorrhiza, emergent stilt root. 

Tim, those roots are so cool looking.  They remind me of some sort of reptile or mammal as opposed to a plant.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Clinostigma savoryanum, always looks great.

Tim

IMG_7309.jpeg

  • Like 19

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This Cryosophila stauracantha attracted attention during a break in the rain.  It has been slow growing so while not an ankle biter by nature, is filling that role for now.

20240207-BH3I3122.jpg

20240207-BH3I3123.jpg

  • Like 12
  • Upvote 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Tracy said:

This Cryosophila stauracantha attracted attention during a break in the rain.  It has been slow growing so while not an ankle biter by nature, is filling that role for now.

20240207-BH3I3122.jpg

20240207-BH3I3123.jpg

Hey Tracy, good on you for growing Cryosophila in SoCal. I’d never thought of that possibility and it looks good.

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The new neighborhood for my Brassiophoenix caught my eye today.  For Where’s Waldo fans there are 2 Brassiophoenix and a Heterospathe leaf visible.

D29CB0EB-51C4-42A6-A8C8-ADF54917E1AF.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was from seed from my Phoenix sylvestris, not sure if it mixed with anything. It's in the shade as most of my palms are, really looking beautiful. Love hate relationship with Phoenix

IMG_2110.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

boot came off from this seed grown D. album var. aureum...

dava001.thumb.jpg.656e670a01f646fa2a99660e891ea908.jpg

...and...

dava002.thumb.jpg.eeafbe75271b9fb36282a84044b6aa50.jpg

Second flowering attempt - but this time it looks promising.

 

Lars

 

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was at Disney California Adventure and spotted this Triangle Palm behind a wall. It looked like it had a few seeds but I was unable to get to the Palm. Harry

IMG_3735.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chrysalidocarpus Hovomantsina Hybrid, bright white crown shaft after a leaf drop 

IMG_0911.thumb.jpeg.b8171197f3f891b9793a65418bb3c525.jpeg

  • Like 15
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peaches anyone? Bactris gasipaes fruiting again. One mean palm.

IMG_2152.jpg

  • Like 10
  • Upvote 1

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arenga pinnata, sugar palm, trying to have billions of babies.

IMG_2154.jpg

  • Like 6

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Hilo Jason said:

Chrysalidocarpus Hovomantsina Hybrid, bright white crown shaft after a leaf drop 

IMG_0911.thumb.jpeg.b8171197f3f891b9793a65418bb3c525.jpeg

Holy smokes! Gorgeous palm. Hovo’s are slow in California yet one of my favorite palms when I visit Hawaii. Maybe a Hybrid would be better here. Looks a lot like ambositrae.

  • Like 3

Encinitas on a hill 1.5 miles from the ocean.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, redant said:

Peaches anyone? Bactris gasipaes fruiting again. One mean palm.

IMG_2152.jpg

Doug, from what I’ve read on this board over the years about Areca in Florida, that is amazing!

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, ellidro said:

Holy smokes! Gorgeous palm. Hovo’s are slow in California yet one of my favorite palms when I visit Hawaii. Maybe a Hybrid would be better here. Looks a lot like ambositrae.

I agree Jason, that is beautiful. Trunk looks similar, but those leaves are so different. 

Tim

  • Like 1

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, realarch said:

Doug, from what I’ve read on this board over the years about Areca in Florida, that is amazing!

Tim

We have been on a string of very moderate winters. The building boom all over FL , IMO is one of the big reasons. This palm had burnt to the ground in 2010, I said good riddance and then it came back lol.  It's a beautiful palm but you can't touch anything on it but the seeds. 

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My previous post showed a Hovomantsina hybrid. My true Hovomantsina caught my eye this weekend when a leaf fell and revealed its first flower.  Planted 6 years ago from a 15 gallon pot. This is in my Hilo garden at 500 feet elevation. 
 

IMG_0894.thumb.jpeg.a83cb5b3bf208a562eedc92f6519049f.jpeg
 

IMG_0896.thumb.jpeg.e12e03344ad84f26c2270681c9da4476.jpeg

IMG_0895.thumb.jpeg.7578a84e68ac8597a581e4f92e0fec6b.jpeg

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, ellidro said:

Holy smokes! Gorgeous palm. Hovo’s are slow in California yet one of my favorite palms when I visit Hawaii. Maybe a Hybrid would be better here. Looks a lot like ambositrae.

Totally thought the same thing. Like a huge Ambositrae in every characteristic. Awesome whatever mix it is. 
 

-dale 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, ellidro said:

Holy smokes! Gorgeous palm. Hovo’s are slow in California yet one of my favorite palms when I visit Hawaii. Maybe a Hybrid would be better here. Looks a lot like ambositrae.

True Hovo’s are slow here too, at least to get to a good planting size. I was fortunate to find some large 10 and 15 gallon sizes when I first moved here. They were probably 10 years old already so I got a nice head start on them. 
 

I can see the Ambositrae resemblance you mentioned. Although I’m pretty sure Floribunda didn’t have any flowering Ambositrae yet when I bought this. So who knows what this could be crossed with. Lots of potential options. 

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...