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Growing king palms


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I’m planting some king palms and read they need lots of water is that equal to royals or more or less?

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Basically they can't be overwatered when it's hot. Also depends on location. Royals don't mind dry heat if they're watered well but kings still can burn.

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Very similar requirements.  Grow any kings except A. cunninghamiana.  I made that mistake.  Is is the fast and least good looking of the bunch.

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Thanks I am in extremely dry desert I have it planted in extreme shade so I hope it will be ok!!!

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Mine is whatever they sell at big box stores it was marked way down because it was a 3 palm pot one was dead and one is very small so I bought it put it in the greenhouse for a couple of months and now I planted it!!

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Most likely A. cunninghamiana.  It is the toughest of the bunch.  Just give it lots of water.  It will take a while to acclimate to the sun.  My best looking ones are planted in mucky clay soil.  

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On 5/5/2022 at 9:14 PM, 96720 said:

Mine is whatever they sell at big box stores it was marked way down because it was a 3 palm pot one was dead and one is very small so I bought it put it in the greenhouse for a couple of months and now I planted it!!

Let's see it! 

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I have several Archontophoenix species in the garden. The cunninghamiana are BY FAR the fastest most robust growers. They like consistently moist soil. I have some growing in stagnant water and they even love that. 
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Edited by Jim in Los Altos
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Jim in Los Altos, CA  SF Bay Area 37.34N- 122.13W- 190' above sea level

zone 10a/9b

sunset zone 16

300+ palms, 90+ species in the ground

Las Palmas Design

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Elegant Homes and Gardens

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I have a few but this one is exposed the most. No issues with frost but that little burn on some of the leaves is from hot sun. It was exposed to 108 last summer but it seems to be adapting as it gets taller.

20220508_191717.jpg

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Cunninghamiana probably is the most adaptable to a variety of climates based on its broad range around the country. 
 

In my yard, Maxima and Tuckeri are the fastest growers followed by Cunninghamiana and Alexandrae. 
 

But I will say individual palm genetics play a huge part too. I have Cunninghamiana that are rockets and I have some that are slow. Same goes with Alexandrae. Lots of genetic variation within Archontophoenix. 
 

Your microclimate and palm placement within your yard based on sunlight, etc can all play a factor. 

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Mine is in dense shade between 2 royals and 2 pindos I hope they don’t outgrow the royals they see our sun and it’s curtains.

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5 minutes ago, 96720 said:

Mine is in dense shade between 2 royals and 2 pindos I hope they don’t outgrow the royals they see our sun and it’s curtains.

Make sure to give the royals more water than you water your kings and you should be ok.

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1 hour ago, James B said:

Cunninghamiana probably is the most adaptable to a variety of climates based on its broad range around the country. 
 

In my yard, Maxima and Tuckeri are the fastest growers followed by Cunninghamiana and Alexandrae. 
 

But I will say individual palm genetics play a huge part too. I have Cunninghamiana that are rockets and I have some that are slow. Same goes with Alexandrae. Lots of genetic variation within Archontophoenix. 
 

Your microclimate and palm placement within your yard based on sunlight, etc can all play a factor. 

Funny, I have over 50 cunninghamiana and every single one has been equally fast growing except the ‘Illawaras’ which have grown at lightning speed. 

Jim in Los Altos, CA  SF Bay Area 37.34N- 122.13W- 190' above sea level

zone 10a/9b

sunset zone 16

300+ palms, 90+ species in the ground

Las Palmas Design

Facebook Page

Las Palmas Design & Associates

Elegant Homes and Gardens

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8 hours ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Funny, I have over 50 cunninghamiana and every single one has been equally fast growing except the ‘Illawaras’ which have grown at lightning speed. 

I have all ends of the spectrum for several types in my yard. I have a Cunninghamiana triple in my front yard that was planted in 2017 and has grown only an additional 6-7 feet in 5 years.

Then I have some in my back yard that grow 18”-24” a year.

Out of all the Archontophoenix in my yard the fastest is one of my A.Maxima which grows 3 feet a year and is now about 17 feet tall purchased as a 5 gallon in Summer 2018.

That said I also have A.Maxima that grow 18” a year so also I see a lot of variation there as well. Still fast but not as crazy fast as the one mentioned above.

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Phoenix area is very unfriendly to archontophoenix sp. in general.  I think they lose too much water through the leaves.  I killed all the ones I tried, probably due to sun/heat exposure.  These want shade in AZ like many tender palms, and no they really dont like the dry/hot of arizona.  They used to have one planted in downtown chandler at the elephant bar, right up against the building, it was not a happy palm.  I suspect without the windbreak/some shading by the building it would have already been dead.  Royals I did see do pretty well there,  I had a Roystonea borinquena in the ground for a year and a half and it was doing fine.  Maybe if you have misters nearby(but no accumulation on the leaves!) and controlled airflow you can create the 30-40%+ humidity they crave.  In florida my archontophoenix alexanders(and maxima) are way faster than the the area cunninghamianas.  I think the alex and maxima want more heat than norcal has if I had to guess.  My slowest is purpurea, yeah its slower than the cunninghamianas in the area, no doubt.  I planted those alexaders as just starting to go pinnate 1 gallon palms,  within 7 years they were over 20' overall, now 11 years after planting they are about 30' overall.   I love they way the white undersides of the leaves reflect light early in the day.

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Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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15 hours ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

I have several Archontophoenix species in the garden. The cunninghamiana are BY FAR the fastest most robust growers. They like consistently moist soil. I have some growing in stagnant water and they even love that. 
F901A825-DC5D-41E0-9539-6FF99C111A83.thumb.jpeg.01fdc006433058d1d1eee177009b94a9.jpeg

C6F0A24E-D2EE-4801-B679-4A09C797AA27.thumb.jpeg.acc89519878ab070e1182c3ccfb60d81.jpeg

297B82E3-7F65-42BF-9A58-C06596494E17.thumb.jpeg.fad72992c57a1706986626cb5255ce73.jpeg

DE8141AF-61E5-49DC-9308-52B945CDA0C4.thumb.jpeg.13608edecfc650e423b7befb1f776504.jpeg You have a wonderful yard. 

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