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fastest screening palms


Sandy Loam
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26 minutes ago, Merlyn said:

And this is the culm view of Asian Lemon, about a 2 year old clump that's been thinned out twice by transplanting sections of culms.  It was also a single 3g pot and is currently 4-5' diameter at ground level.  About a month ago I cut off every lower branch, because it keeps sending feelers out across my pathway.  As you can see, it just keeps regrowing low branches, and the culms alone are so dense that you can see through less than 5% of it.

546218279_20220503_120421BambusaAsianLemonculms.thumb.jpg.b3abbd9402845d58ced45936f727f367.jpg

Wow. Thanks! I do want low-level screening too, so maybe Asian lemon is the one instead of bambusa Guangxiensis. If I need to keep my screen only about one foot wide, do you think that would be thick enough to provide screening?  Lastly, where did you find Asian Lemon bamboo for sale? Does your respect a plastic rhizome barrier? 

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30 minutes ago, Palm Tree Jim said:

Not sure on the type of bamboo but in the first picture the height is about 10 feet tall.  It does appear that they grow higher but I'm not sure how much. And it is a clumper without spreading out to much.  Tomorrow I will be at a nursery and will ask what type it is. They are very fast growers as well, at least here in Costa Rica.

Thank you! I can't wait to hear. 

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31 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow. Thanks! I do want low-level screening too, so maybe Asian lemon is the one instead of bambusa Guangxiensis. If I need to keep my screen only about one foot wide, do you think that would be thick enough to provide screening?  Lastly, where did you find Asian Lemon bamboo for sale? Does your respect a plastic rhizome barrier? 

Yeah, Guangxiensis is too widely spread at ground level, and wouldn't make a good screen at only 1 foot wide.  Asian Lemon (or Asian Lime if you prefer green culms) are better for culm density and a dense low screen.  The probably-textilis type that Jim posted are undoubtedly just as dense. 

1 foot wide, though...that's really narrow.  I don't have rhizome barriers on any of my boos, since they aren't runners.  If they start shooting off in a direction I don't like, I just kick over the new shoots in that area.  That kills off that one shoot, and over time it sort of "trains" the boo to not grow in that direction.  Honestly keeping something in a 1 foot wide section is going to be really tough, regardless of whether it's a hedge, palm, bamboo, etc.  Asian Lemon will grow out of a 1 foot area in the first year.  Something like a Textilis "RG Dwarf" or similar might work better in a super-narrow area.  @Gottagrowemall might have some suggestions on the smaller textilis species.  The nice thing about the smaller ones is that you can slice through rhizomes easier, with a battery powered reciprocating saw or maybe even one of those spinning-blade type edgers.  So cutting them back is easier than cutting through a 1-2" thick rhizome like with Asian Lemon.

 

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7 hours ago, Merlyn said:

Yeah, Guangxiensis is too widely spread at ground level, and wouldn't make a good screen at only 1 foot wide.  Asian Lemon (or Asian Lime if you prefer green culms) are better for culm density and a dense low screen.  The probably-textilis type that Jim posted are undoubtedly just as dense. 

1 foot wide, though...that's really narrow.  I don't have rhizome barriers on any of my boos, since they aren't runners.  If they start shooting off in a direction I don't like, I just kick over the new shoots in that area.  That kills off that one shoot, and over time it sort of "trains" the boo to not grow in that direction.  Honestly keeping something in a 1 foot wide section is going to be really tough, regardless of whether it's a hedge, palm, bamboo, etc.  Asian Lemon will grow out of a 1 foot area in the first year.  Something like a Textilis "RG Dwarf" or similar might work better in a super-narrow area.  @Gottagrowemall might have some suggestions on the smaller textilis species.  The nice thing about the smaller ones is that you can slice through rhizomes easier, with a battery powered reciprocating saw or maybe even one of those spinning-blade type edgers.  So cutting them back is easier than cutting through a 1-2" thick rhizome like with Asian Lemon.

 

Thanks!  I will check out  Bambusa Textilis "RG Dwarf". 

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There’s also multiplex fern leaf which is a really small bamboo. I’m not too familiar with it because it’s almost too small for most of my customers.

 

id recommend multiplex Alphonse karr as well. It’s yellow with a green stripe, pinkish new growth. Slightly smaller than graceful. The clump does get big if it’s not trained though like Merlyn said. You have to thin it out each year and kick over shoots that are going too far. They won’t get that expansive until almost the 5th year though

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On 5/2/2022 at 9:58 AM, Sandy Loam said:

The goal is to block out the view of neighbours on 3 sides.  I see now that the lot is not a big as I initially thought and I will have to plant something quite narrow to block out the views.  At the same time, I don't want to block out all of the sunshine either.   The houses are low (one storey) on two sides, but they house to the left is a large two-storey home.  I guess I will have to rule out wider hedges like seagrape and viburnum.   I might have to go with a skinny bamboo and just hope that it won't escape its rhizome barrier if I install one.  ..... this is going to be a tough decision.   

 

What are your plans for the remaining area? If you are growing palms or other trees, and determine your outward viewing point(s), you may not need a full perimeter of hedges, as the palms/trees/shrubs you grow can block the view from where they are planted between home and property line. Do you not have fences? 

Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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4 hours ago, Kim said:

What are your plans for the remaining area? If you are growing palms or other trees, and determine your outward viewing point(s), you may not need a full perimeter of hedges, as the palms/trees/shrubs you grow can block the view from where they are planted between home and property line. Do you not have fences? 

Well...... My need for all of this disappeared an hour ago when I found out that I won't be buying the property after all.  What a shame! I was about to put an offer in for it. Nevertheless, there is some useful info on this thread.  Yes, I was going to add some Florida royal palms and I'm not sure what else in addition.  Unfortunately, all of that became moot about an hour ago. Thanks anyways! 

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Sorry to hear the news on the house. 

I'm sure something else will come up for you.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Check out Fishtail Palms. They are bushy and clumping palms and have a nice vertical growth pattern. Great lush tropical foliage without any invasive tendencies or pests. And definitely less maintenance than a hedge! I use them here in West Palm Beach, but I’m just not sure how they stand up to colder temps

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7 minutes ago, Chris R said:

Check out Fishtail Palms. They are bushy and clumping palms and have a nice vertical growth pattern. Great lush tropical foliage without any invasive tendencies or pests. And definitely less maintenance than a hedge! I use them here in West Palm Beach, but I’m just not sure how they stand up to colder temps

They would have probably been OK where the original poster was going to move.  Wish it hadn't fell through at the last minute.  Caryota mitis take damage in the rougher winters along the I-4 corridor, but usually recover pretty fast.  A good litmus test for them is on the westbound shoulder of I-4 between Davenport and Orlando.  If you're OK with how they look after the winter here and have a similar climate, go for it.

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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To be honest I think a screen of Metroxylon salomonense planted like 10ft apart on center would foot the bill.  In 5 years, it will be a trunk screen.

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24 minutes ago, ahosey01 said:

To be honest I think a screen of Metroxylon salomonense planted like 10ft apart on center would foot the bill.  In 5 years, it will be a trunk screen.

You would plant a screen of monocarpic palms? Asking for a friend...

Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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1 minute ago, Kim said:

You would plant a screen of monocarpic palms? Asking for a friend...

Temporary screen.  Like the kind of screen you roll up after the movie is over.

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On 4/30/2022 at 11:41 PM, Sandy Loam said:

I'm talking about Volusia County right on the beach - - well, just one street away from the beach, so basically on it.  There are old Dypsis lutescens there. 

You are talking about inland places which get colder, like plant city.  Yeah, Zephyrhills and dade city get really cold (even more than plant city), but that is not the same climate to where the privacy screen would be planted.

So, how fast does Dypsis lutescens grow? 

Thanks. 

 

 

In Port St Lucie my Dypsis Lutescens are growing at 2 feet per year, no irrigation, but triannual high quality palm fertilizer. Moderate growth rate I would say, especially if watered supplementally. 

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