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Washingtonia Filibusta - Fayetteville NC


knikfar

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18 minutes ago, jwitt said:

I was referring to the root on the right which looks separate from the seedling it is nearly attached to.   I was amazed at the length.

Just something I have observed regarding washy roots, being so large when young, any sort of pot must restrain the roots.

Maybe I am mistaken, but I felt that long root was separate from the shorter root and sprout.  Either way, that is one heck of an aggressive root, something I have seen with filifera leaning washies. 

Ultimately my question is are both roots from the same seedling, or is the longer root still not sprouting top growth yet? 

Screenshot_20240118-201858.png

Thanks for clarifying. It was attached to the seed/sprout pictured. I created a deep hole for this and other longer rooted sprouts. I'll update on their progress.

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Zone 6b maritime climate

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1 hour ago, Leelanau Palms said:

Thanks for clarifying. It was attached to the seed/sprout pictured. I created a deep hole for this and other longer rooted sprouts. I'll update on their progress.

I think it is 2 roots one seed .Kep us posted what happens .

Will

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Polar Vortex report on my only planted 'Fayetteville' Washingtonia'. Three nights where temps dropped into dicey territory.

Jan. 11 (16.5°F)  Jan.12 (23.4°F)  Jan.13 (20.5°F) Light frost after but lingering for the remainder of the week. I did a burlap wrap on this small palm. No supplemental heat. It's under a poly cover to shed rain, frost or snow. That is all.

 

January 19, 2024

Wash.1.jpg.0b5c5ebb0f4d1e5a0665d33c706410cf.jpg

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Wow. Thanks for the update. I am very interested in what the full damage or lack of it will be. How old is it and how long in the ground? 

Edited by Leelanau Palms

Zone 6b maritime climate

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If anybody still has seeds from this palm I would like some.

An Autistic 18 year old who has an obsession with Palms!

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Update: four days in a pot with emerging structures and chlorophyll.  They have been under a grow light. No apparent casualties/losses to date.

image.thumb.jpeg.e10d1e33da140743b35db27c83369b65.jpeg

Edited by Leelanau Palms
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Zone 6b maritime climate

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/18/2024 at 3:28 PM, Leelanau Palms said:

Thanks to @BeyondTheGarden here are my Washingtonia filibusta 'Fayetteville" starts:

December 28th 2023 placed half of the ~ 60 seeds in MG potting soil and the other half in sphaghnum (placed under my sink where a heat vent warms)

image.thumb.jpeg.9a455522eb3c03551ac2a9a449cdcfe2.jpeg

Today, January 18, 2023 I potted up 11 sprouts in MG potting soil with perlite and vermiculite added.  More seeds (7) sprouted to date in the MG potting soil

image.thumb.jpeg.f7ea3fb795bfd3a9128eff8eb33e9816.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.8a219814f6db93763b9f460ed796169c.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.359b150f4bb122b59416fc2f30b391cf.jpeg

The weather outside is frightful, but the washies inside are delightful.

 

 

Latest update today, February 5, 2024:

image.thumb.jpeg.8629535ac1ee69dc71a407d13509f3d5.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.38e80cecbb1aae18ed62a9aeef0b93a1.jpeg

 

I've had 3-4 casualties to date, (1 damping off/mold, 1-2 burnt by too much grow light) but am replacing them with freshly sprouted babies from the baggy.  A switch in baggy location from a warm cupboard above a heat duct to a dedicated heat mat has significantly increased the numbers and the rate of germination. It appears that letting them continue to develop in the baggy to a point where they have newly branched roots and a longer shoot (like >1-1.5cm long) increases their establishment and success rate (vs. just barely sprouted) upon transfer to a pot.

Edited by Leelanau Palms
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Zone 6b maritime climate

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On 1/18/2024 at 4:21 PM, knikfar said:

It's about 3' tall if I had to guess. I've attached a photo I took in December. It looks rougher now. 

Washy1.jpg

Did it die ? 

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I think that protection at a young age is important for them to gain some thickness. Depending on the winter and whether the lot didn't get mowed down, the ones on the lot defoliate and regrow in the spring if they are lucky.

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I need some input. I have my washy seedlings under a grow light in a warm room but hope to get them to a bright but cooler window sill/floor next to a large window (especially as their numbers grow). What are acceptable and ideal temperature ranges for these seedlings?

Zone 6b maritime climate

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6 hours ago, Leelanau Palms said:

What are acceptable and ideal temperature ranges for these seedlings?

Acceptable: 60°F - 75°F

Ideal: 75°F - 85°F

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17 hours ago, Las Palmas Norte said:

Acceptable: 60°F - 75°F

Ideal: 75°F - 85°F

Thank you for the info.

Zone 6b maritime climate

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@BeyondTheGarden, @knikfar, and @Las Palmas Norte (and anyone else),  I need your expertise. My washy seedlings appear to be growing well with good color, etc. but I noticed these extremely small white spots on their newly emerged leaves.  A water spritz did not remove these. A gentle wipe seemed to. No movement observed. Disease or debris or other?

 

image.thumb.jpeg.31b1edbc3bf9d8a7af461fc79c2ecdfc.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.b33c566bf8f7b041792ff829168d4915.jpeg

Zone 6b maritime climate

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2 hours ago, Leelanau Palms said:

@BeyondTheGarden, @knikfar, and @Las Palmas Norte (and anyone else),  I need your expertise. My washy seedlings appear to be growing well with good color, etc. but I noticed these extremely small white spots on their newly emerged leaves.  A water spritz did not remove these. A gentle wipe seemed to. No movement observed. Disease or debris or other?

 

image.thumb.jpeg.31b1edbc3bf9d8a7af461fc79c2ecdfc.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.b33c566bf8f7b041792ff829168d4915.jpeg

I don’t know for sure but it looks like scale to me. Try removing the white spots with an old toothbrush to see if they come off.

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2 hours ago, Leelanau Palms said:

@BeyondTheGarden, @knikfar, and @Las Palmas Norte (and anyone else),  I need your expertise. My washy seedlings appear to be growing well with good color, etc. but I noticed these extremely small white spots on their newly emerged leaves.  A water spritz did not remove these. A gentle wipe seemed to. No movement observed. Disease or debris or other?

 

image.thumb.jpeg.31b1edbc3bf9d8a7af461fc79c2ecdfc.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.b33c566bf8f7b041792ff829168d4915.jpeg

That's normal for them to have those white spots!

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An Autistic 18 year old who has an obsession with Palms!

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I wish I had a better answer, I have so many palms indoors that tiny details like that often go unnoticed until it becomes more of a problem, and I end up doing what people say not to do, and wipe the leaves with a very mild dish soap solution, followed by a clean paper towel.  Some one on here told me I should never apply detergent to a palm, however. 

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1 hour ago, BeyondTheGarden said:

I wish I had a better answer, I have so many palms indoors that tiny details like that often go unnoticed until it becomes more of a problem, and I end up doing what people say not to do, and wipe the leaves with a very mild dish soap solution, followed by a clean paper towel.  Some one on here told me I should never apply detergent to a palm, however. 

I've used windex on my chamaerops seedlings for scale 😂

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On 2/8/2024 at 2:47 AM, Leelanau Palms said:

@BeyondTheGarden, @knikfar, and @Las Palmas Norte (and anyone else),  I need your expertise. My washy seedlings appear to be growing well with good color, etc. but I noticed these extremely small white spots on their newly emerged leaves.  A water spritz did not remove these. A gentle wipe seemed to. No movement observed. Disease or debris or other?

 

image.thumb.jpeg.31b1edbc3bf9d8a7af461fc79c2ecdfc.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.b33c566bf8f7b041792ff829168d4915.jpeg

 

That characteristic is also observed on my larger Washingtonia palms (Fayetteville). Nothing to be alarmed about. A healthy looking start for your seedlings.

 

W.robusta.thumb.jpg.7971d20236f8d0a650f6ca8d9fa1fd22.jpg

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@Las Palmas Norte , thank you so much for the input and reassurance. I am inspired by your personal collection of W. filibusta 'Fayetteville'. Hope mine thrive as much as yours have.

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Zone 6b maritime climate

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20 hours ago, ZPalms said:

I've used windex on my chamaerops seedlings for scale 😂

shocked-emoji-smiley.png.bff08455850ad494f6bcccb364b14c1d.png

Nah uh u h. Never use Windex© on plant material. Have you seen what's in that product? None of that seems plant friendly.

 

Windex.png.b8783909b85ee4dcaf3260901dc52dcc.png

 

I use a home made solution which can be applied safely and repetitively. Physically remove the scale insect by hand and then spray the mix from a sprayer.

Insecticidal soap.

2 tbsp plant based (natural) dish liquid (see below)

1 tbsp canola or vegetable oil

4 cups (32oz) tepid water.

Mix slowly without foaming the mixture.

(you can reduce the total amount by diving the ingredients accordingly)

 

It's a Canadian product but there's going to be an equivariant product for you there. 

PlantBasedSoap.jpg.ed8f94ede9f5645bfbf4f65b4217948f.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Las Palmas Norte said:

shocked-emoji-smiley.png.bff08455850ad494f6bcccb364b14c1d.png

Nah uh u h. Never use Windex© on plant material. Have you seen what's in that product? None of that seems plant friendly.

 

Windex.png.b8783909b85ee4dcaf3260901dc52dcc.png

 

I use a home made solution which can be applied safely and repetitively. Physically remove the scale insect by hand and then spray the mix from a sprayer.

Insecticidal soap.

2 tbsp plant based (natural) dish liquid (see below)

1 tbsp canola or vegetable oil

4 cups (32oz) tepid water.

Mix slowly without foaming the mixture.

(you can reduce the total amount by diving the ingredients accordingly)

 

It's a Canadian product but there's going to be an equivariant product for you there. 

PlantBasedSoap.jpg.ed8f94ede9f5645bfbf4f65b4217948f.jpg

 

LOL I always think about making a soap mix myself, one of my indoor plants have scale and thrips... Idk what to do on that but I saw somebody on here I think use windex and it did work but yeah probably not the safest thing but it did work 😂

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3 hours ago, Las Palmas Norte said:

shocked-emoji-smiley.png.bff08455850ad494f6bcccb364b14c1d.png

Nah uh u h. Never use Windex© on plant material. Have you seen what's in that product? None of that seems plant friendly.

 

Windex.png.b8783909b85ee4dcaf3260901dc52dcc.png

 

I use a home made solution which can be applied safely and repetitively. Physically remove the scale insect by hand and then spray the mix from a sprayer.

Insecticidal soap.

2 tbsp plant based (natural) dish liquid (see below)

1 tbsp canola or vegetable oil

4 cups (32oz) tepid water.

Mix slowly without foaming the mixture.

(you can reduce the total amount by diving the ingredients accordingly)

 

It's a Canadian product but there's going to be an equivariant product for you there. 

PlantBasedSoap.jpg.ed8f94ede9f5645bfbf4f65b4217948f.jpg

 

I've used Malathion a couple times in the past to treat scale, but I may try this next time instead.  Less risky and much cheaper.  Thanks for sharing

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4 hours ago, NCFM said:

I've used Malathion a couple times in the past to treat scale, but I may try this next time instead.  Less risky and much cheaper.  Thanks for sharing

Malathion has been banned here and not for sale since sometime in the 90's I believe. It did work but I'm sure it was a pretty toxic systemic.

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2 days ago, was exactly 2 months since I harvested seed. And some are already pushing out their second strap leaf.  

20240213_181627.jpg

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42 minutes ago, BeyondTheGarden said:

2 days ago, was exactly 2 months since I harvested seed. And some are already pushing out their second strap leaf.  

20240213_181627.jpg

Looking good! My seeds from you were started in late December, like a couple of weeks behind yours. Your seedlings have younger cousins in Michigan 😊

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Zone 6b maritime climate

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  • 2 weeks later...

Not from the same seed batch but after most of my filibusta's dried out when I returned from colorado, some survived and currently have 7, gave one out last week to a friend. I got two growing a second strap leaf from december batch while others recently sprouted up.

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On 1/19/2024 at 10:19 AM, jwitt said:

I was referring to the root on the right which looks separate from the seedling it is nearly attached to.   I was amazed at the length.

Just something I have observed regarding washy roots, being so large when young, any sort of pot must restrain the roots.

Maybe I am mistaken, but I felt that long root was separate from the shorter root and sprout.  Either way, that is one heck of an aggressive root, something I have seen with filifera leaning washies. 

Ultimately my question is are both roots from the same seedling, or is the longer root still not sprouting top growth yet? 

Screenshot_20240118-201858.png

That looks like a healthy root system to me.

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1 hour ago, RFun said:

That looks like a healthy root system to me.

Never insinuated it wasn't healthy.  

The strangeness of one root growing upwards and the other down, gave me pause to question if it was 2 plants.  

That is all.20240223164702.png.5c550d4a9ad3047a227d40622b81dd07.png

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20 minutes ago, jwitt said:

Never insinuated it wasn't healthy.  

The strangeness of one root growing upwards and the other down, gave me pause to question if it was 2 plants.  

That is all.20240223164702.png.5c550d4a9ad3047a227d40622b81dd07.png

I know that.

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22 minutes ago, RFun said:

I know that.

Both hybrids, is one possibly unnatural or even damaged by growing conditions?

I see a difference.IMG_20230619_192256.thumb.jpg.634156e63911867d98a03db92f079920.jpg

20240223164702.png.c58c1f33dade9be8a080eded6d1534ce.png

My thoughts.....

 

 

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These were sprouted in a baggy, so their growth pattern was more random initially.  I should have marked this particular seedling to track its progress. I cannot tell you how it has done. I've lost a few seedlings along the way--all had sprouts above soil level in their pots. One had straight out mildew (which seemed to come directly from the seed), the others seemed to reach about 1.5-2cm with some green, then turn "skinny," dry out, and die. They have been under grow lights x 12 hours per day @ ~ 65-75 degrees / 30-40% humidity,  with careful squeeze bottle watering based on pot weight.

Zone 6b maritime climate

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  • 1 month later...

My seedlings were slowed by 10 days at a neighbor's cool, dark house while I was on spring break. Here is the latest summary picture of them. Two of them have browning leaves (from overwatering earlier, I believe). Some are starting on their third leaves.

image.thumb.jpeg.f85ad0c301cfe41600db925281990787.jpeg

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Zone 6b maritime climate

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  • 3 weeks later...

Saw these online yesterday (they are a new offering) and it made me think maybe you folks growing Washingtonia palms in marginal locations might be interested. Claims the parent survived 8 degrees. I’ve ordered a variety of plants from this botanical garden and they’ve always been great.  
 

https://www.plantdelights.com/products/washingtonia-filifera-denton

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