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The worst storm in 35 years is about to smash the British Isles (UK)


UK_Palms
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Right, so this has pretty much come out of nowhere over the past 24-48 hours. Two major Atlantic storms are due to barrage into us this week with the first less severe one making landfall on Wednesday evening, affecting northern areas more. However the second more severe storm is due to hit central England with extremely violent wind speeds affecting the whole of the UK. That second storm is the one I am worried about down here in southern England. Potentially 100mph+ winds in the pipeline, looking at some of the models. 

 

This is the first, and less severe, storm Dudley that is due to hit Scotland and northern England on Wednesday. This will still bring widespread disruption for most of the UK...

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Here's the second storm. This map looks real nasty, so hopefully it doesn't verify.  The UKV model is predicting 110-115mph winds off the coast of Wales and southwest England as Eunice makes landfall with category 2 hurricane wind speeds. I have 70mph gusts forecast for me here at 6am, before it even properly arrives. 

FLgJl1TXMAAqDSh.jpg.1a239983d681f3816b3949f1e600dcc4.jpg

 

The DWD Icon model is terrifying. 80-90mph winds for me here at 3pm on Friday. 100mph off the southeast coast of England. Again, hopefully this model does not verify either. 

FLlqZv6X0AYYxm1.png.79965324acf4a78a4975e50b5abb5714.png

 

Potentially 130mph winds off the southeast coast of Ireland and UK. That is category 4 hurricane strength winds! Heaven forbid it makes landfall at that strength. 

 

Worryingly there appears to be a third, even bigger storm building up behind the two others...

 

There seems to be multiple scenarios and it could potentially be downgraded, or even upgraded further yet still. Some really worrying runs appearing in the models. 

 

This needs to go in the bin/trash. Record wind speeds are going to be getting set in the southeast on Friday if this materialises. Potentially 100+ mph winds just southeast of London.

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The French Met are commenting on it, so you know things are serious. I hope those wind speeds are kmh and not mph!!!!

 

London has a high of 17C / 63F forecast for Wednesday, but make no mistake it will still be overcast and windy as storm Dudley crashes into northern England and Scotland. The hurricane force winds won't arrive until Friday (black triangle) for the south of England, when storm Eunice makes landfall. Hopefully it gets downgraded between now and then... 

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Edited by UK_Palms

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100 mph cyclone in the middle of winter? Strange indeed, at least to me, hopefully the worst does not come to pass with these.

Corpus Christi, TX, near salt water, zone 9b/10a! Except when it isn't and everything gets nuked back to the stone age of zone 8.

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9 hours ago, Xerarch said:

100 mph cyclone in the middle of winter? Strange indeed, at least to me, hopefully the worst does not come to pass with these.

The stormy period for us here is typically from October - March during the cooler months, although up until now we have been totally anti-cyclonic so far this winter with no proper storms yet. We have had unusually high pressure and calm, dry conditions for the past 2-3 months. When we get a bad storm though, it comes in the December - March period when the North Atlantic is usually quite volatile. The April - September period is usually pretty dry and calm here, which is the opposite to most subtropical/tropical regions. 

At the very least it looks like it will be the worst storm since 2013 and it will probably be the worst storm of the 21st century here. There is certainly potential for it to be the worst storm since 1987 and the worst case scenario being the worst storm in a century for some regions. Unfortunately the latest model runs are taking the storm further south and almost giving me a direct hit. There is still time for it to move further south or north, or for it to decrease in intensity, but it really isn’t looking good, less than 72 hours out from it happening. This is looking more and more likely to hit the west coast of France and northern Spain now too @gurugu

This could be devastating for places like Cornwall and Tresco as it makes landfall with potentially 115mph winds. Huge storm surges as well in those places. I hope it doesn’t fell any of the big CIDP’s!!!

3EC6A751-8C8B-484E-B51F-58ED90998742.jpeg.c81f5a9656b21b2ebabc885695d03954.jpeg
 

If the Icon Model materialises, God help us. That’s showing 110mph winds on the south coast of England, even for the less exposed southeastern regions. Those wind speeds are literally unheard of for us here… 

7EF40815-B601-412E-BF5A-1892F7877B3E.thumb.jpeg.2e453749d43e38fd987dfb180a0ad4f5.jpeg

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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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Hopefully it gets downgraded nearer the time for southern England especially would be in total chaos storms of that kind are very rare  most of the time they pass to the north of Scotland/Ireland 

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3 hours ago, Samuel said:

Hopefully it gets downgraded nearer the time for southern England especially would be in total chaos storms of that kind are very rare  most of the time they pass to the north of Scotland/Ireland 

In all likelihood it will get downgraded, but either way it is going to be one of the worst storms in decades for some of us folk in the UK. And that’s at the lower end of the spectrum, it could potentially be upgraded in the coming hours and days and get even worse yet. 

Hopefully it tracks further south, or further north, largely missing me here in southeast England, however that just shifts the problem onto someone else. As it stands those are some pretty extreme wind speeds though, even for inland regions.

This ECMWF run is ridiculous…

Surely these models can’t verify for us here in the southeast! 100mph winds in Cornwall or Wales is one thing, but not in southeast England surely!

Worryingly, here is the low end of the spectrum model forecast and this guy isn’t even in the main impact area either. He’s still expecting the strongest wind speeds in decades despite this.


The Cyclone Centre in Florida is reporting on both storms. I expect them to produce a tracking map for Eunice in the next 24 hours. We’re talking category 3 cyclone wind speeds for some places.

Here is the BBC forecast ahead of Dudley hitting us. Very mild in the east of England with widespread highs of 16-17C, before the first storm hits later that evening. The less severe of the two. Eunice will be something else entirely.

It looks like a historic storm either way. The first storm, Dudley, looks set to effect you guys tomorrow @Ryland before it’s evil twin batters us on Friday. Time to batten down the hatches! 

Edited by UK_Palms

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This will be interesting to see how it plays out.  It seems like the UK has been having more extreme weather the last 10 years or so.

So at what time of day is "Tea time"?? I heard Helen Willets mention that's when the rain is returning.

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UK_Palms,  the USA is about to get some crazy weather too, after the recent incursion of arctic air, temps will be rising some 40 degrees in less than two days.  They are expecting dangerous tornadic weather to break out in the Southeast before it transforms into a system expected to bring gale and hurricane force winds from the the Mid-Atlantic into New England.  This kind of storm is more typical of March than mid February.  I know a lot of these storms eventually reach Britain after they leave the East coast. This current one should be exiting North America on Friday. Stay tuned.

https://www.accuweather.com/en/severe-weather/11-states-under-threat-of-major-severe-weather-outbreak/1141981

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2 hours ago, Chester B said:

This will be interesting to see how it plays out.  It seems like the UK has been having more extreme weather the last 10 years or so.

So at what time of day is "Tea time"?? I heard Helen Willets mention that's when the rain is returning.

 

A lot can still change between now and Friday with about 60 hours remaining until the storm hits. Hopefully the models are downgraded somewhat and the storm is less intense than currently being suggested. However there is still a lot of cross model support for an extreme storm event with near record wind speeds in parts of southern and central England.

With the clock ticking ever nearer the hour, the models are really going to be make or break by this time tomorrow, We will have a better picture of what to expect at 48 hours out. Here is one of the recent ECM ensembles below for example, showing a potential scenario where the storm may track further north and spare the south of England. This benefits me. 

 

Some of the model runs also don't develop the low properly and it comes out as a mild storm with perhaps 70mph gusts on the coasts and 50mph gusts here inland where I am. I think this is more wishful thinking though at this stage and unlikely to verify. There is way more cross model support for an extreme storm event with potentially 120mph winds along the south coast and 90-100mph where I am here. In truth it will probably end up being somewhere in between, which will still be the worst storm in decades. It looks bad. 

 

I've barely even covered the effects of storm surge in the coastal areas...

 

Regarding the whole "tea time" thing, well... people in England, especially those up north in places like Manchester, Liverpool, Sheffield etc they sometimes say "tea time" instead of 'dinner time'. So basically 'tea' just means 'dinner' to them. Like they will say "what time do you want your tea", which means 'what time do you want dinner'. They still use the word 'dinner' as well, just often they will refer to it as 'tea'. If they are referring to the drink, they will say a "cup of tea". I know it is confusing and it's a bit of a northern thing saying 'tea' instead of 'dinner'. I would never say that myself but then again I am from the south and I never drink tea in general either. 

Funny enough, that Helen Willets you mention was born in Chester, near Liverpool. She's a northerner, hence why she uses the "tea time" expression. 

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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

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@UK_Palms Stay safe over there!

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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3 hours ago, sandgroper said:

"Tea time" is also used in Australia.

We are more English than the English sometimes. LOL

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

We are more English than the English sometimes. LOL

And I'm sixth generation Australian from convict stock! :D

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13 hours ago, Chester B said:

This will be interesting to see how it plays out.  It seems like the UK has been having more extreme weather the last 10 years or so.

So at what time of day is "Tea time"?? I heard Helen Willets mention that's when the rain is returning.

Breakfast - something you eat in the morning

Dinner - something you eat midday

Tea - your evening meal

So living in the north (of England anyway) I have a dinner break from work around noon, then I cook my tea when I've finished work for the day :)

@UK_Palms thanks for mentioning me - to be honest I hadn't even heard there was a storm coming otherwise.  Not much I can do, my garden is relatively walled off so that should prevent anything getting torn up horribly.  Probably the biggest impact will be around whether I can make it to the pub on Friday night!

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Manchester, Lancashire, England

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19 hours ago, oasis371 said:

UK_Palms,  the USA is about to get some crazy weather too, after the recent incursion of arctic air, temps will be rising some 40 degrees in less than two days.  They are expecting dangerous tornadic weather to break out in the Southeast before it transforms into a system expected to bring gale and hurricane force winds from the the Mid-Atlantic into New England.  This kind of storm is more typical of March than mid February.  I know a lot of these storms eventually reach Britain after they leave the East coast. This current one should be exiting North America on Friday. Stay tuned.

https://www.accuweather.com/en/severe-weather/11-states-under-threat-of-major-severe-weather-outbreak/1141981

I will have to keep an eye on the situation on your side of the pond as it will likely cross the Atlantic on the jet stream as you mention. There definitely appears to be a 3rd storm brewing behind the previous two that we are getting, which may be linked to your storm. If so, it will probably impact us here on Sunday. 

That would mean 3 storms in the space of 5 days for us potentially! An extremely active period, in an otherwise abnormally calm winter. We’ve had nothing so far up until now. Like you guys we also have the threat of tornadoes and active tornado warnings in place for Friday. I’m really not looking forward to it. Stay safe on your end.

Edited by UK_Palms

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12 hours ago, Tyrone said:

We are more English than the English sometimes. LOL

Isn’t Perth’s population like 1/3 British born? I heard tons of British accents when I was out there, unlike in Sydney or Brisbane for instance. I think like 90% of Western Australians have British ancestry if I’m not mistaken, like you and @sandgroper. Obviously it is lower in the eastern states, so I wonder whether English phrases like ‘tea time’ are still used over there as well, or whether it is more of a WA thing? 

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5 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

Isn’t Perth’s population like 1/3 British born? I heard tons of British accents when I was out there, unlike in Sydney or Brisbane for instance. I think like 90% of Western Australians have British ancestry if I’m not mistaken, like you and @sandgroper. Obviously it is lower in the eastern states, so I wonder whether English phrases like ‘tea time’ are still used over there as well, or whether it is more of a WA thing? 

All of Australia has a strong British influence being part of the commonwealth and all, but it is waning now. WA for some reason has a high percentage of British ancestry. A lot came out in the last 50-60 years from Britain. I reckon it’s due to the fact that until jet air travel, it used to take ages to get here, and WA is the closest to the UK, so many landed here maybe with the intention of going east, saw the blue sky, and thought that travelling any further was just out of the question, and stayed. 

You could be right about phrases like “tea time” being more West Oz then. I haven’t really paid attention. We are in some ways like a different country over here. 

I hope your storms just fizzle out to be not too strong. 

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Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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Dudley made landfall in northern Scotland on Wednesday afternoon as a category 2 cyclone and has brought some pretty significant winds already to the northern regions of the UK, however it is nothing compared to what cyclone Eunice will bring to the south on Friday. Dudley is weakening and now a category 1 cyclone as it travels across the North Sea towards southern Scandinavia. 

 

Dudley still left its mark...

 

A lot of trees down tonight, which makes you wonder what Eunice will bring on Friday..?

 

At least these wind turbines didn't cost much... oh wait :bemused:

 

101mph was the highest recorded windspeed so far with Dudley, up in Scotland. You can probably add about 20-30mph on top of that for cyclone Eunice on Friday. 

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Thousands are left without power in Scotland and northern England...

 

The forecast models seriously underestimated the effects of the wind in southern England from Dudley. They mostly forecasted the first storm to impact Scotland and northern England mostly, but it seems most of the UK has been effected by it. I have recorded a wind speed of 56mph here tonight. People in London are reporting quite a bit of damage...

 

Looking ahead to cyclone Eunice on Friday, it really isn't looking good. We're less than 36 hours away from it making landfall, so I can't see the models changing much between now and then. 

 

Some models suggest 135mph winds off the coast of Ireland and Cornwall before it makes landfall.

 

Potentially 120mph winds inland in central England!

 

Still lots of uncertainty about where Eunice will track and just how bad the winds will be though. Some models suggesting 85-90mph winds around London on Friday afternoon. It's going to be bad either way now, there is no avoiding that. We won't know the finer details until tomorrow though. 

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There is going to be a pretty severe storm surge on Friday...

 

Edited by UK_Palms

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Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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Storm Dudley created some issues over here but fits the picture of a storm that we see more often. Still quite windy sometimes but compared last night/evening it is less. 
Over here the eyes are more on Eunice that will come on friday as different models are still widespread in terms of strength.  Some output says it will be similar to Dudley but there is also output that will much more powerfull than we normally see (Windgusts up to 140/150km and some extreme cards up to 180km).  Just read that at some places they are closing the storm surge barriers which says they don't want to take any risk. 

On the positive side, looks like this february will be frostfree as we keep the mild conditions. In that case this winter will be very mild again except some light frosts which only lasted a short moment.  It is a true shame that every now and then we still got hit by a coldwave otherwise I could plant much more diversity in palms. Tradescantia even survived outside which has been planted as summer bedding last year!

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@Exotic Life Yeah it has been relatively mild this winter so far. The lowest at London City airport this winter is 0C / 32F, which is located in one of the milder parts of the city. It has also been extremely calm and wind-free as well for us here this winter, up until now at least. I agree that it hasn’t been a bad winter overall for us and a lot milder than last winter was. 

Despite the wind and overcast conditions that we experienced yesterday, it was still exceptionally mild here. My nearest official Met Station, South Farnborough, recorded a high of 17.9C / 64F yesterday, which was the highest reading in the country. If I’m not mistaken this is probably a temperature record for the date (16th Feb) in the UK and also for anywhere else in the world above 50N. Still some way off the February UK temperature record though which is 21C / 70F.

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Edited by UK_Palms

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43 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

@Exotic Life Yeah it has been relatively mild this winter so far. The lowest at London City airport this winter is 0C / 32F, which is located in one of the milder parts of the city. It has also been extremely calm and wind-free as well for us here this winter, up until now at least. I agree that it hasn’t been a bad winter overall for us and a lot milder than last winter was. 

Despite the wind and overcast conditions that we experienced yesterday, it was still exceptionally mild here. My nearest official Met Station, South Farnborough, recorded a high of 17.9C / 64F yesterday, which was the highest reading in the country. If I’m not mistaken this is probably a temperature record for the date (16th Feb) in the UK and also for anywhere else in the world above 50N. Still some way off the February UK temperature record though which is 21C / 70F.

The record on a official weather station here in The Netherlands for the 16th of february is 18.3C and comes from 2020. 
Specially the last 3 years maximum records have been broken on several days - Including the alltime month record that stands on 20.5C for the country. My personal station made it that day till 21.0C which is my personal record for february. Only December and January are months where I did not record 20C or higher, so there is some work to do haha.

What is your lowest temperature this winter? If I remembered well you wrote on EPS -6C on one of the not so many frost nights this winter. 

Edited by Exotic Life

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@Exotic Life Looking at the data source I am using (Not Met Office), the 17.9C temperature recording yesterday at South Farnborough does appear to be a record for the date, although there is an unverified recording of 18.6C from 1933. I don’t think that was recorded on ‘official’ and regulated equipment though. It certainly isn’t recognised. The February record of 21.2C was set at Kew Gardens on the 26th back in 2019. As you say, there have been quite a few temperature records being set in recent years, both in summer and winter. To me, it is evidence of a warming climate, at least in northwest Europe anyway. What was your high over there yesterday? 

I have probably experienced more frosts than you this year due to all the clear skies and dry weather that we have had. January only had 0.2 inches of rainfall and on one of the days it only reached 3-4C here with clear skies all night long allowing roughly 16 hours of radiational cooling, since the days are so short in January. That night I went down to -6C out here in the rural countryside with no Urban Heat Island, while central London didn’t drop below 0C. So there is an UHI effect of roughly 5-6C there on the coldest of nights. That particular night was a bit of a one-off though. Generally speaking it has been pretty mild here this winter, both at night and during the day. Similar to you guys. 

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Yesterday was already pretty rough here, I'm not looking forward to tomorrow.  The most significant events so far are a Washingtonia leaf torn in two right down the middle, and part of my roof (not big) fell off.  Not great as it's right over the new bathroom that I finished painting a couple weeks ago :crying:

Temperature-wise we've barely had a winter.  I've had as many frosts as last winter already but still not a lot: 2 frosts in November (including the winter low so far of -2.2ºC), none in December, 4 in January (the coldest of which was -0.9ºC) and none in February so far.

Manchester, Lancashire, England

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We're only 7-8 hours away now from Cyclone Eunice making landfall in the UK. The southwest regions have had their max windspeed's toned down a notch, but they are still expecting around 100mph winds in coastal areas. Probably 90mph further inland too potentially. This is before it reaches peak intensity over land as well 2-3 hours later. So it's surely the worst storm in a decade for southwest England. This is the UK Met model so it's probably going to be fairly reliable. This is 9am when it makes landfall. 

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The forecast has worsened for me here over the past 12 hours or so. I am now expecting 94mph winds as Cyclone Eunice passes over me around midday tomorrow according to the Icon Model. This is usually the best model for forecasting windspeed as well, which is a bit worrying. For the Southeast of England at least, it's probably the worst storm since 1987. We rarely get storms as bad as the southwest experiences. Like surely I can't get 94mph winds here!? I have been recording wind speed here for 4 years now and the highest I have had so far is 69mph. So that's another 25mph on top of that. Possibly more.

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The Met Office has gone to the maximum warning level. 

 

This thing is about to intensify and pass over the UK as a category 2 cyclone, possibly category 3, before weakening again down to category 1... :o

 

There are some really concerning model runs showing winds of almost 120mph inland from a potential 'sting jet' later in the day on Friday...

FLyE43zWQAIrD-g.thumb.jpg.3957c109c119d42f409868f145013e75.jpg

 

Some interesting information from a US meteorologist's perspective...

 

The storm surge will have to be watched closely...

 

Schools in the southwest have all closed apparently for Friday ahead of Eunice making landfall...

 

There are worrying signs that this is actually worse than originally forecast. Current wind speeds at this stage are higher than anticipated and the pressure is lower too.

 

The 'stinger jet' that I mentioned earlier has apparently already formed.

 

All I can say right now is that it is eerily calm outside at this moment. There is no wind at all. It's the calm before the storm though, no doubt. I am taking no risks and have dragged as much stuff into the garage as possible tonight. Now I am going to try and sleep. The next time I post on here, I will probably be getting ravaged by 80-100mph winds. 

Gulp. 

92873265_thumbnail_image0(27).thumb.jpg.55958a47089fc6084adaea5c2daef6c1.jpg

 

Edited by UK_Palms
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It's not looking great, they've closed all the schools in Wales and parts of the southwest - hopefully it ends up at the milder end of the forecasts.  I've seen that there is now a second red weather warning in southeast England.

Great Butia by the way @UK_Palms!

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Manchester, Lancashire, England

53.4ºN, 2.2ºW, 65m AMSL

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1 hour ago, Ryland said:

It's not looking great, they've closed all the schools in Wales and parts of the southwest - hopefully it ends up at the milder end of the forecasts.  I've seen that there is now a second red weather warning in southeast England.

Great Butia by the way @UK_Palms!

Yeah the winds are really picking up here now that Eunice has made landfall, although it’s alternating between rain and sun here. I’m not expecting the storm to reach peak intensity here for another 2-3 hours though as it continues moving east over the UK. I’ve tried to protect as much stuff as possible in the garden, but I am at work now so will have to assess the situation when I get back. I am expecting a lot of damage and losses though.

Sorry to hear about the damage in your own garden from Dudley. It looks like you guys will be spared the worst of it today though as Eunice tears through southern England. There is going to be absolute carnage for anyone in the path of that potential ‘sting jet’ later on. Possibly 120mph winds over central England in places. It is already gusting up to 55mph here and will probably go up to 90mph around midday. Hopefully no tornadoes touch down from this thing! Trees are already coming down though and the storm surge has started. A real nasty cyclone. 

 

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I just read that The Needles on the Ilse of Wright broke the English wind gust record with 122mph/192kph.  They also say it is a exposed site which could give something extra to wind gusts but still quite impressive. Here the stronger winds are expected by late afternoon and keep on going into the night. At this moment you can feel that the wind is slowly picking up speed.  

Edited by Exotic Life

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@Exotic Life Yes the Met have confirmed the 122mph recording on the Isle of Wight. It is the highest gust ever recorded in England as you say. That record will probably be broken again in the next hour or so. Pretty worrying. 

The southeast of England is getting hammered now. It is absolute carnage here!

This is the Millennium Dome in London with the worst wind speeds still yet to come!


Church spires are coming down around the south of England…

Millions of trees are going to come down today. Cars are getting written off. I’ll be surprised if people aren’t killed…

 
I’m still 1-2 hours away from experiencing the worst of it here in southeast England. It’s going to smash into the Netherlands next. 
Edited by UK_Palms

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It's basically past now - still breezy but nothing wild.  The worst to happen to the garden was some tearing up of the Washingtonia leaves.  It'll be looking a bit ragged for a while, but thankfully it's a fast grower so it should be better by May.  Hopefully no shocks for you @UK_Palms and you @Exotic Life!

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Manchester, Lancashire, England

53.4ºN, 2.2ºW, 65m AMSL

Köppen climate Cfb | USDA hardiness zone 9a

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Seems that this storm created problems for sure - but based on all my years in the UK, up till moving to Portugal, it fell some way short of the likes of the Burns storm of 1990 and the much vaunted 'Hurricane of 1987' which in relatively recent history are the two windstorms that created the biggest hiatus and true mass destruction. The storm of today probably on a par with some of the storms seen during turbulent 2013/14 winter and which I do remember the lesser disruption that was created.  In relative terms.

So whilst the windspeed at The Needles on the isle of Wight off the south coast of England broke a record today (N.B it is a well known extremely highly exposed weather site where windspeeds are often greatly elevated vs the norm) the bigger picture did not quite match some of the more severe indicator predictions of earlier in the week. Which is of course a good thing.

Edited by petiole10
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To be honest, the storm wasn't quite as bad as I was expecting here, despite England recording its all time record wind speed of 122mph as well as several fatalities, sadly. It was still obviously a pretty destructive storm, just not quite as extreme as anticipated. As previously mentioned, the storms of 87 and 90 were worse, especially in terms of deaths and total damage. Eunice still wrecked total havoc across the UK though, as you will see...


Falling trees seem to be the biggest danger to life in these kind of events with flying debris the second biggest risk. Both of these threats/risks have taken lives today. 

 

The death count is ramping up now with many more injured. Several people are 'critical' in hospital. Lot's of stories of people having lucky escapes. Some less lucky.

 

I don't know whether this is just from the wind in general, or whether a tornado may have touched down? How fast does the wind have to be to move parked cars?

 

Just a tree smashing a London bus...

FL4u00tXEAEuPpQ.jpg.727dd474c61bca034b69989bbe218bfb.jpg

 

So many cars destroyed by trees. Not surprising that people were killed, sadly.

 

London earlier...

 

Pretty much all trains suspended...

 

Quite a bit of structural damage in places...

 

I'm surprised people weren't killed by falling bricks...

 

A power station chimney was brought down...

 

I never lost power here, to my knowledge, but millions of people have been without power for hours. 

 

The storm Surge in southwest England and Wales wasn't particularly bad, but still dangerous...

 

Not sure where this storm ranks frankly. It was pretty bad, but probably nowhere near as bad as the infamous 1987 and 1990 storms. 

 

Tree's kept coming down throughout the night and into Saturday...

 

Edited by UK_Palms
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Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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Similar damage over here as what you are showing for UK. Lots of trees came down and material damage to buildings as well. Unfortunately also 4 people died due falling trees.

In the end the storm was not the heaviest I experienced but it belongs to the bigger ones. 
My own windmeter is a little sheltered why it is difficult for me to have accurate wind readings so I have been looking to 2 other amateur weather stations close to me which reported sustained winds for at least 3 hours between 100-110 kph which is high 10Bft/Low 11 Bft. Both stations recorded windgusts up to 130-135kph.  Highest wind gust at a official weather station have been 145 kph which was quite far inland as well. 

Since then I have been basically been windy all the time with regularly gusts from 70-80kph.  This evening the wind will increase again with wind gusts up to 120kph again but this time also with lots of rain. Also monday afternoon/evening looks windy again with gusts up to 100-10kph in the forecast. 

My palms are trashed from southwest side, big "holes" in the crown. I also had to take down my Eucalyptus tree because it was leaning to one side and it was partly uprooted. To avoid further problems with the eye on the foreast for today/tomorrow I had no other option. Palm protection has also been trashed but I see some first signs of spring on the long term so I will start taking that down in the coming weeks. 

62116bd1a5cde.png
 

Southwest

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The storm costed me an Italian cypress tree. It was also strongly leaning to one side. Not taking any chances I cut it down. 

Storm seems to be getting worse again. 

Edited by Marco67
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I heard you guys in the Netherlands got hit pretty hard too. I saw a few crazy videos of big trees collapsing in Amsterdam and some Dutch gardens getting battered by near hurricane force winds. The south coast of England took the brunt of it though with that crazy 122mph recording on the Isle of Wight. I recorded an 82mph gust here on Friday.

I think an F1 tornado may have passed through just to the north of my village. I was at work over in Guildford, but some people on my street are saying they could see a funnel cloud from their living room windows at midday and then winds really picked up for 5-10 minutes. Anyway, here is some of the damage in my yard from cyclone Eunice...

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Someone's gutter blew into my garden. I have no idea where it came from!

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I am surprised the neighbours flag pole is still standing, although it is clearly on borrowed time now. Cyclone Franklin tears through on Monday and will probably topple it. 

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I spotted this in my village today...

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The winds are really howling again now with Cyclone Franklin approaching the UK. It's due to make landfall during the early hours of Monday morning in northern Scotland, but yet again the whole of the UK will feel the effects. As will the Netherlands, northern Germany and possibly southern regions of Scandinavia as it tracks east. I can't believe we are now having a 3rd cyclone/storm in the space of 5-6 days here in the UK. That is probably a new record in itself. It's got to be the stormiest week in history arguably. 

 

The third major storm in 6 days, after nothing all winter or autumn/fall. What a joke. 3 storms in the space of a week is a new record, surely?

 

The UK is already getting battered by Franklin way before it even makes landfall...

 

Brace for impact I guess. There are going to be scenes of devastation by sunrise and Monday morning is shaping up to be a rough one for us Brit's. 

Edited by UK_Palms

Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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That squall line in one of your embedded movies came trough here last evening which was short lived but quite intensive with a big dump of rain and even some hail. 
During the pass trough wind gusts peaked at 127 kph on that weather station near me.  All 3 storms were active on 2 days over here means we now have 6 days in a row storm force winds somewhere in the country which never happened before in February. Only 1990 had with 9 days more storm days in February but that year the longest period in a row have been 3 days.  Tomorrow it will be breezy from time to time but afterwards we will finally getting into a more calm weather regime. 

Meanwhile southern Europe is really dry. For example the village Sete which is located near Montpellier only received 0.8mm of rain so far this year. 
Those regions rely on their winter rains to go trough the dry warm spring/summer season. If they don't get more rain soon this could give a extra effect on heatwaves in those regions this summer which maybe could also effect our temperatures if winds turn south. 

Edited by Exotic Life

Southwest

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