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Washingtonia Filibusta


ZPalms
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14 hours ago, ZPalms said:

The most annoying and devastating thing happened to my washies, the table that they are sitting on I put outside on the lip of the steps of the screen in porch so they could get some sun for a couple hours and later in the day it started to pour rain and I didn't think to realize the rain that was going to come off the roof was going to completely pound the top of these 4 bags that were sitting directly under it and one fell over. I managed to save them all and get them all back into shape so hopefully they all survive from that beating they just received from the roof.

 

 

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They should be fine.  I use milk crates to store mine so they don't fall over

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Is it safe to use mosquito bits tea to water my washies? (It's mosquito bits soaked in water then filtered to remove the physical bits)

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4 minutes ago, ZPalms said:

Is it safe to use mosquito bits tea to water my washies? (It's mosquito bits soaked in water then filtered to remove the physical bits)

Yup. :shaka-2:

 

I had pretty much gotten rid of them, then i bought some cheap soil and damnit they're back. 

 

I'm using mosquito dunks (same concept, just more difficult to get into little bits), sticky traps, h2o2, and beneficial nematodes to try and get these little flying jerks under control. Probably overkill but if it works it works. 

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29 minutes ago, JohnAndSancho said:

Yup. :shaka-2:

 

I had pretty much gotten rid of them, then i bought some cheap soil and damnit they're back. 

 

I'm using mosquito dunks (same concept, just more difficult to get into little bits), sticky traps, h2o2, and beneficial nematodes to try and get these little flying jerks under control. Probably overkill but if it works it works. 

Awesome thanks! I'm using dollar general soil and it's not the worst it came almost completely gnat free and smelled of neem oil but i have no idea if it has neem oil in the soil but gonna go ahead and water my washies right now!

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Tbh I'd wait 

 

Gnats mean you're overwatering, and they just got flooded the other day. 

 

Let them dry out first. 

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40 minutes ago, JohnAndSancho said:

Tbh I'd wait 

 

Gnats mean you're overwatering, and they just got flooded the other day. 

 

Let them dry out first. 

They sit in a screen in porch so they don't get direct contact with rain other than when they got destroyed that one time, I'll leave them be for another 2 days and not water them I've been trying to get some stones so they can sit out under the sun without sitting directly in the grass

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  • 2 weeks later...

They have grown quite a bit, How long do I keep them in these bags or can they stay in these bags as if they were pots or Do they need to be moved to pots?

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6 hours ago, mydateplams said:

I would keep them as long as you could. One - two years.

Thank you!

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  • 9 months later...

We grew one from seed six years ago in Wilmington North Carolina it is doing fine. there is also a large one at Wrightsville Beach.

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Knikfar has the Washys that might be great for the Wilmington area . I got three of them . You have probably seen his post about them growing  in Fayetteville .

Like I said , he sold me 3 . 

Will

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  • 1 month later...

I recently spotted a relatively large Washingtonia Filibusta in the ground in The Hague, Netherlands (zone 7b / 8a). I was pleasantly surprised, not sure if they protect it in the winter. Will check what it is like in the winter in a few months. It was in a sheltered spot surrounded by many walls and a lot of pavement, possible urban heat island effect going on.

Here is a google streetview image: https://www.google.com/maps/@52.0614369,4.3348981,3a,56.3y,123.12h,96.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sW-gjBzaXCUdXUdj0w6Eiww!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

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4 minutes ago, Zeni said:

I recently spotted a relatively large Washingtonia Filibusta in the ground in The Hague, Netherlands (zone 7b / 8a). I was pleasantly surprised, not sure if they protect it in the winter. Will check what it is like in the winter in a few months. It was in a sheltered spot surrounded by many walls and a lot of pavement, possible urban heat island effect going on.

Here is a google streetview image: https://www.google.com/maps/@52.0614369,4.3348981,3a,56.3y,123.12h,96.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sW-gjBzaXCUdXUdj0w6Eiww!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

At first while driving by I thought it was a pale Trachy (Princeps), but then I stood closer and saw clearly it was a Washingtonia. :D

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  • 4 months later...
On 5/13/2021 at 3:29 PM, buffy said:

For the most part, all of the filibustas survived the -5F freeze with one week under freezing here in Longview. 

Would you have any of your super hero filibusta seeds to spread and invade thé belgien soil here😍

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On 5/6/2021 at 6:41 PM, Reyes Vargas said:

I don't know how well they would do in North Carolina but I might have some seeds to send you.  I do have to check because they were eaten by some bug.

Here is my tree I collected the seeds from.

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May I also get any?🙂

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On 5/19/2022 at 9:51 PM, Zeni said:

I recently spotted a relatively large Washingtonia Filibusta in the ground in The Hague, Netherlands (zone 7b / 8a). I was pleasantly surprised, not sure if they protect it in the winter. Will check what it is like in the winter in a few months. It was in a sheltered spot surrounded by many walls and a lot of pavement, possible urban heat island effect going on.

Here is a google streetview image: https://www.google.com/maps/@52.0614369,4.3348981,3a,56.3y,123.12h,96.83t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sW-gjBzaXCUdXUdj0w6Eiww!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Nice photo Zeni. You don't see them often planted out in the Netherlands. 

I think The Hague is 8B (-6,7/-9,4 C; 15-20 F) .  In our damp cool winters Washingtonia's can only take about -6 C (21 F).  It might survive for some years but I think unprotected Washingtonia's won't survive long term here.  I agree that the sheltered spot might help a bit. 

Edited by Marco67
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3 hours ago, Marco67 said:

Nice photo Zeni. You don't see them often planted out in the Netherlands. 

I think The Hague is 8B (-6,7/-9,4 C; 15-20 F) .  In our damp cool winters Washingtonia's can only take about -6 C (21 F).  It might survive for some years but I think unprotected Washingtonia's won't survive long term here.  I agree that the sheltered spot might help a bit. 

Curious what it looks like in January and February. I don't think the owner protects it (too big for it now), but who knows.

About the zones, yeah I think The Hague may be 8b. Many of these weather stations nearby who record the official weather are in exposed areas like airports or just outside the city lacking UHI effect. I have even seen people growing Red Cordylines in the ground in The Hague. Red Cordylines have a similar hardiness to Washingtonia Filibustas.

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2 hours ago, Zeni said:

Curious what it looks like in January and February. I don't think the owner protects it (too big for it now), but who knows.

About the zones, yeah I think The Hague may be 8b. Many of these weather stations nearby who record the official weather are in exposed areas like airports or just outside the city lacking UHI effect. I have even seen people growing Red Cordylines in the ground in The Hague. Red Cordylines have a similar hardiness to Washingtonia Filibustas.

Parts of Zeeland are even 9a. Unfortunately sometimes we are hit by cold air from the east which can last for a week or more and limits our options. Cordylines are zone 9 plants so I don't think they will make it longtime. 

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