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New Record For April.


Paradise Found
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So far this year we've have had more full sunny days this April than all of last year.  We are finally going to get some rain this weekend and beyond with temps going below average due to rain. House plants are all ready out side which is the earliest I have done that.  Should break a record by the end of the year for the most full sunny days. 2021 is looking good for the PNW. B)

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14 minutes ago, RedRabbit said:

Approximately where are you at in the PNW?

The story came out in Seattle, but I live in Olympia state capital city.  

Here is the story from komo news.

https://komonews.com/weather/scotts-weather-blog/talk-about-a-blue-streak-seattle-has-more-cloudless-days-this-week-than-last-summer

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Similar situation over here in the UK. We have had record breaking levels of April sunshine and virtually no rain at all this month. About 75% of April has been crystal clear skies without a cloud in sight. We must have had nearly 200 hours of sunshine already this month. Consequently nighttime temps have been well below average here, due to the clear skies, thus we are on course to have our most April frosts ever too. I have probably had about 10 frosts this April, in my rural, inland location. Lots of 60F highs and 30F lows under the clear skies. 

It will probably also be the driest April on record as well though. I mean it is absolutely bone dry here. I have only had 0.07 inches for April so far and only 0.58 inches this spring, since March 1st. I actually had to water the Washies that are in the ground the other day, in April! The national rainfall average this month is 5mm, but I have only had 1mm of rain down here in the southeast of England. Apparently the farmers are struggling to plant crops due to the drought like conditions. 

 

thumbnail_image0-13.thumb.jpg.c8d1f149a2dba3bac3d6caf133f12611.jpg

 

Also, I'm surprised you have had more sunshine this week than last summer. I thought Seattle and Olympia were full-on Med climates with dry, sunny summers? 

Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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37 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

Similar situation over here in the UK. We have had record breaking levels of April sunshine and virtually no rain at all this month. About 75% of April has been crystal clear skies without a cloud in sight. We must have had nearly 200 hours of sunshine already this month. Consequently nighttime temps have been well below average here, due to the clear skies, thus we are on course to have our most April frosts ever too. I have probably had about 10 frosts this April, in my rural, inland location. Lots of 60F highs and 30F lows under the clear skies. 

It will probably also be the driest April on record as well though. I mean it is absolutely bone dry here. I have only had 0.07 inches for April so far and only 0.58 inches this spring, since March 1st. I actually had to water the Washies that are in the ground the other day, in April! The national rainfall average this month is 5mm, but I have only had 1mm of rain down here in the southeast of England. Apparently the farmers are struggling to plant crops due to the drought like conditions. 

 

thumbnail_image0-13.thumb.jpg.c8d1f149a2dba3bac3d6caf133f12611.jpg

 

Also, I'm surprised you have had more sunshine this week than last summer. I thought Seattle and Olympia were full-on Med climates with dry, sunny summers? 

Good point UK Palms,

Are summer are very dry most of the time and when it does rain in the summer it so little it doesn't amount to anything.  Some summer we get a break and will get one or two big rain storm off the pacific the tropical plants really like it when that happens. 

 It's very sunny here in summer by normal standard. We have lots of days with one cloud in the morning and gone one hour later. But that does not represent a true sunny day according to the news story.  It's crazy I know but true. Also last summer we had almost two months of smokey days due to all the forest fires which gave the garden an orange glow somedays sometimes the temps were 90F / 32.2 C.

Hope that clears things up. 

 

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My mother lives in Ashland, Oregon, a fair bit south of you @Paradise Found but still in the Pacific northwest (more like a cool California climate though) and she's been telling me about the dry April.  For her it's very worrying though, because reservoirs are already depleted and she's worried about the fire risk, especially with the long, dry summer ahead.  Are things holding up a bit better for you in Olympia with regards to fire risk and water availability?  I've been through that area before by the way, and really like that part of the US (if I were to live in the US I'd be looking at Puget Sound).  Good mountaineering opportunities nearby as well :D

Same here @UK__Palms, it's been a rainless month even in Manchester!  I've also had cold nights for the time of year, but only two frosts (both -0.2C) and a handful of nights which came close.  No doubt my urban environment adds a few degrees.  Despite this all the palms are growing vigorously already!  I've got some particularly sturdy looking new fronds emerging on the Washingtonia robusta and Brahea armata.

Manchester, Lancashire, England

53.4ºN, 2.2ºW, 65m AMSL

Köppen climate Cfb | USDA hardiness zone 9a

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Water is not the problem here we broke all time records for snow pack this year in the mountains. 

It is so dry here that we've has about a dozen brush fires in Western WA.  But now that were going to have some rain for a few days they stop talking about it on the news. Big fires don't usually happen until June to September in the mountains. Seattle area had some really bad fires last summer that were right up on people back yards.  The smoke is the biggest problem here it comes from Eastern WA during their big fires. 

Hiking... had some friends that hike the mountain trails from AZ to CA, OR, WA into Canada all in one trip took a while and its a very popular trail.

What really gets people from out of state is how green it is in winter too. And all the different plants from around the world that grow here.  But we don't just have green trees, we have lots of different colors leaves and shapes. And of course we have one of the best climates for bulbs and perennials in the country.  You do have to put up with all the rain and clouds in winter to get those beautiful spring and summers flowers. 

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12 hours ago, Ryland said:

Same here @UK__Palms, it's been a rainless month even in Manchester!  I've also had cold nights for the time of year, but only two frosts (both -0.2C) and a handful of nights which came close.  No doubt my urban environment adds a few degrees.  Despite this all the palms are growing vigorously already!  I've got some particularly sturdy looking new fronds emerging on the Washingtonia robusta and Brahea armata.

I'm surprised how much milder your nights have been up there in Manchester. It must be the UHI effect in Manchester and maybe you having more cloud cover up north on the cold nights? Down here, we've had clear skies pretty much every day and night really for the last 2-3 weeks now. It's been like 95% clear skies this month, so the number of radiation freezes at night is ridiculous for April. I have never had this many freezes, this late on in spring, although frost hasn't been forming due to how dry it is here. It's just cold at night. But I am seeing diurnal swings of 20C, going from 17-18C by day right down to -2C at night. That was the case last night here. I'm right out in the rural countryside though with no UHI whatsoever. 

I think the radiation freezes may have stalled a lot of the palms here. No damage or anything, but they're not moving as quickly as last spring. I am seeing growth in the Trachy's, Chamaerops and Washies, in that order, but a lot of the stuff is barely moving here, unlike this time last year. The Butia, Jubaea, Phoenix, bananas etc were all actively growing this time last year. I'm hoping they kick into growth in the coming week or two. Looking at the forecast, I reckon tonight may be my last frost here until autumn/fall. I have +2C forecasted as the low, but I expect it to reach 0C tonight due to the clear skies all night.

No sign of any rainfall before the end of the month either. I will probably finish on 0.07 inches here for April. It's scary dry here for the time of year. Thursley Common, which is 3 miles SW of me, has been put on 'extreme' fire danger watch. There was a bad fire there last summer. I see you've had some fires up near you with Dovestone and Saddleworth Moor going up in flames, again. https://saddind.co.uk/public-urged-to-take-care-in-countryside-after-latest-wildfire-at-dovestone-reservoir/ 

Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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13 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

I'm surprised how much milder your nights have been up there in Manchester. It must be the UHI effect in Manchester and maybe you having more cloud cover up north on the cold nights? Down here, we've had clear skies pretty much every day and night really for the last 2-3 weeks now. It's been like 95% clear skies this month, so the number of radiation freezes at night is ridiculous for April. I have never had this many freezes, this late on in spring, although frost hasn't been forming due to how dry it is here. It's just cold at night. But I am seeing diurnal swings of 20C, going from 17-18C by day right down to -2C at night. That was the case last night here. I'm right out in the rural countryside though with no UHI whatsoever. 

I think the radiation freezes may have stalled a lot of the palms here. No damage or anything, but they're not moving as quickly as last spring. I am seeing growth in the Trachy's, Chamaerops and Washies, in that order, but a lot of the stuff is barely moving here, unlike this time last year. The Butia, Jubaea, Phoenix, bananas etc were all actively growing this time last year. I'm hoping they kick into growth in the coming week or two. Looking at the forecast, I reckon tonight may be my last frost here until autumn/fall. I have +2C forecasted as the low, but I expect it to reach 0C tonight due to the clear skies all night.

No sign of any rainfall before the end of the month either. I will probably finish on 0.07 inches here for April. It's scary dry here for the time of year. Thursley Common, which is 3 miles SW of me, has been put on 'extreme' fire danger watch. There was a bad fire there last summer. I see you've had some fires up near you with Dovestone and Saddleworth Moor going up in flames, again. https://saddind.co.uk/public-urged-to-take-care-in-countryside-after-latest-wildfire-at-dovestone-reservoir/ 

I think the real reason we’ve had comparatively few frosts is that it’s just a bit milder. The influence of the Irish Sea is considerable here despite the distance (no hills in between, plus it’s to the west so the prevailing weather comes right off it). As you noted, there is also bound to be some urban effect. Normally our overnight lows are within about a degree of London, especially in winter. Rural areas can get a few degrees colder on the coldest nights, more so to the south and over in Yorkshire (further inland, less direct Irish Sea effect). It’s been an effectively cloudless month here too, and the coldest nights have all been clear. The diurnal swings have been biggish but not crazy - many days of 15 followed by nights of 3 or so this month. The coldest nights just touched freezing or thereabouts a handful of times, but very brief dips that the temperatures quickly rebounded from.

I’m sure your palms will bounce back quickly. As you say, hopefully you’re at the end of the frosty run now. You wouldn’t think that the lightness and shortness of these frosts should have too much of an effect given your warm days, buts it’s only April anyway so I’m sure there will be movement in May. I bet your Washingtonias are growing though!

Good point about the fires. I didn’t know about that Saddleworth one - it’s always happening when people are lighting up barbecues in fine weather! @Paradise Found I’m glad to hear of your snowpack to the rescue! It is indeed a fine climate there and the rain is a thing to be grateful for. I think my mother is less lucky, I don’t think they have the snowpack there in southern Oregon. She’s always worried about the smoke which seems to fill the valley with horrible air for a month every summer, often coming from California. I hope some of the rain you’re about to get heads her way too.

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Manchester, Lancashire, England

53.4ºN, 2.2ºW, 65m AMSL

Köppen climate Cfb | USDA hardiness zone 9a

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10 hours ago, Ryland said:

I think the real reason we’ve had comparatively few frosts is that it’s just a bit milder. The influence of the Irish Sea is considerable here despite the distance (no hills in between, plus it’s to the west so the prevailing weather comes right off it). As you noted, there is also bound to be some urban effect. Normally our overnight lows are within about a degree of London, especially in winter. Rural areas can get a few degrees colder on the coldest nights, more so to the south and over in Yorkshire (further inland, less direct Irish Sea effect). It’s been an effectively cloudless month here too, and the coldest nights have all been clear. The diurnal swings have been biggish but not crazy - many days of 15 followed by nights of 3 or so this month. The coldest nights just touched freezing or thereabouts a handful of times, but very brief dips that the temperatures quickly rebounded from.

I’m sure your palms will bounce back quickly. As you say, hopefully you’re at the end of the frosty run now. You wouldn’t think that the lightness and shortness of these frosts should have too much of an effect given your warm days, buts it’s only April anyway so I’m sure there will be movement in May. I bet your Washingtonias are growing though!

Good point about the fires. I didn’t know about that Saddleworth one - it’s always happening when people are lighting up barbecues in fine weather! @Paradise Found I’m glad to hear of your snowpack to the rescue! It is indeed a fine climate there and the rain is a thing to be grateful for. I think my mother is less lucky, I don’t think they have the snowpack there in southern Oregon. She’s always worried about the smoke which seems to fill the valley with horrible air for a month every summer, often coming from California. I hope some of the rain you’re about to get heads her way too.

Ryan I hope your mother gets some rain soon.  She's in a dry area in the spring and summer and her growing season is two weeks earlier than mine in the spring and two weeks longer in the fall. They get up into the 100's a lot more than I do.  

Its was so dry here even Fastsia were drooping down. Never seen that before not even in summer.  The rain is light but steady. :lol:

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Well here in Portland we broke a few records this year.  Driest March/April on record, and most consecutive days over 70F in April at 8.  We've had many more days over 70 and a handful over 80F.  Snow pack is still at 135% which is great, but my lawn has already started to yellow and cracks are appearing.  I have been watering regularly the last couple weeks, and have my drip irrigation up and running.  Potential for rain tonight, but if we get any it won't amount to much most likely trace amounts, and no real rain in the 14 day forecast.  It feels like we've hardly had a cloudy day since February.

Don't get me wrong I am loving the weather, but the spectre of fire is always looming.  We already had a few days of red flag warnings and there was a 40 acre fire near me a week or so ago.

I forgot to mention that our humidity has been terribly low.  Anywhere from teens to low 30's%, its playing havoc with our nasal/sinuses and skin.  Never mind the wood flooring in my house showing cracks everywhere from the contracting wood.

 

 

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I wish I could send some of you our water:

12.84 inches of rain  for the month in Baton Rouge. We need 2 more inches to break the all-time record for April. Won't happen - 2021 looks to come in as second place for the record books.

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2 minutes ago, Sabal_Louisiana said:

I wish I could send some of you our water:

12.84 inches of rain  for the month in Baton Rouge. We need 2 more inches to break the all-time record for April. Won't happen - 2021 looks to come in as second place for the record books.

Yikes, that's insane.  That's 1/3 of our yearly rainfall in one month.

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1 minute ago, Chester B said:

Yikes, that's insane.  That's 1/3 of our yearly rainfall in one month.

You should have been here in August 2016 - 32 inches in a couple of days in my parish. 80% of homes around here took in water. I didn't get it in my home but was stranded for 5 days. Worst flooding I ever saw in my lifetime.

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On 4/22/2021 at 11:55 AM, Paradise Found said:

The story came out in Seattle, but I live in Olympia state capital city.  

Here is the story from komo news.

https://komonews.com/weather/scotts-weather-blog/talk-about-a-blue-streak-seattle-has-more-cloudless-days-this-week-than-last-summer

Disclaimer: take this with a grain of salt, sorry if I sound like a jerk.

Hey sorry I'm late, but looking at your profile, you say you had last ten years 9a and a few 9b in Olympia. That's simply not true. There have been no 9b winters recorded in Olympia ever. Now, maybe you're in a nice microclimate. If so, I'm completely wrong. I'm using NOAA data.

Here are the last ten winters in Olympia, WA.

(2021 (so far): 20 (8b/9a))

2020: 20 (8b/9a)

2019: 5 (7a/7b)

2018: 13 (8a)

2017: 12 (8a)

2016: 13 (8a)

2015: 18 (8b)

2014: 13 (8a)

2013: 11 (8a)

2012: 18 (8b)

2011: 5 (7a/7b)

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On 4/30/2021 at 11:47 AM, Teegurr said:

Disclaimer: take this with a grain of salt, sorry if I sound like a jerk.

Hey sorry I'm late, but looking at your profile, you say you had last ten years 9a and a few 9b in Olympia. That's simply not true. There have been no 9b winters recorded in Olympia ever. Now, maybe you're in a nice microclimate. If so, I'm completely wrong. I'm using NOAA data.

Here are the last ten winters in Olympia, WA.

(2021 (so far): 20 (8b/9a))

2020: 20 (8b/9a)

2019: 5 (7a/7b)

2018: 13 (8a)

2017: 12 (8a)

2016: 13 (8a)

2015: 18 (8b)

2014: 13 (8a)

2013: 11 (8a)

2012: 18 (8b)

2011: 5 (7a/7b)

Ha Ha, thats funny but you are mistaken for sure...let me explain. 

The airport is not in the city of Olympia but south of Tumwater ( next town south of Olympia...) so My weather is allway's warmer at night than the Airport. For example one winter blast we had about 15 years go The airport was -2F my place in town was only 12F. This winter my place was 25F in the open, 27F in the  protected shade.  Beside how could I grow a mule palm B x S for 15 years in the ground with no protection but the overhead protection from an old holly tree.  I am on the edge of 8a/8b, but the last decade has been nice and mild giving me serval 9b 25F plus.  The temps you show from the airport I would not have any Butia alive! :lol: Some of my aloes are only hardy to 9a and they are still alive, hardy to low 20's and someday they will die from a hardy freeze. 

It a good observation on your part so thats for asking.  My tree fern is still alive after 15 years in the ground.  If it goes below 25F I cover the crown with a blanket. 

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I'm in the same boat.  The weather station for Portland is at the airport which is always colder in winter.  It's at the mouth of the Columbia Gorge so gets the cold winds and air from the interior that hit it directly.  I'm 20 minutes south and it does make a difference, although there is the rare occasion where I can be colder.

This winter during the same event that caused the cold in Texas, Portland proper was cold enough that they got a few inches of snow.  Unfortunately I did not, I was right at the freezing line so we ended up getting heavy amounts of freezing rain and the all the damage that accompanies it.

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Seattle News this morning announced that in the last 30 years seattle has gotten warmer and rainier, they now have almost 40" yearly rain.   I am sure most of us can say the same thing about your climates. LOL. 

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36 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

Seattle News this morning announced that in the last 30 years seattle has gotten warmer and rainier, they now have almost 40" yearly rain.   I am sure most of us can say the same thing about your climates. LOL. 

Warmer?, yes.   Wetter?  Back east perhaps, not here.
https://www.weather.gov/psr/19912020Normals

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2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Warmer?, yes.   Wetter?  Back east perhaps, not here.
https://www.weather.gov/psr/19912020Normals

That is some very interesting information and graphics in that link. It seems that the monsoon season of the Western US has had somewhat of a decline in strength and totals as the years moved on. It remains to be seen if that is the trend that will continue, or if its only a temporary.

Mid-latitude upper-level troughs are to blame for any perceived variances, probably. They can definitely weaken (or at least delay) the onset of the monsoon season out West when they keep setting up shop over the Western US. And when they occur over the Eastern US (even in summer!) that reinforces a dipole pattern that creates cooler than normal (or limited warming) temperature anomalies in the Eastern US.

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4 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Warmer?, yes.   Wetter?  Back east perhaps, not here.
https://www.weather.gov/psr/19912020Normals

Ok maybe your climate has less rain, LOL!  But they were only talking about Seattle, I should have kept it to that city.  

What is your hottest temp you have reached? Me... 104F. 

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1 minute ago, Paradise Found said:

Ok maybe your climate has less rain, LOL!  But they were only talking about Seattle, I should have kept it to that city.  

Pretty much all of the west has seen precip declines. Coastal Washington will eventually as well

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5 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Pretty much all of the west has seen precip declines. Coastal Washington will eventually as well

I've heard both sides It will be wetter, or dryer, I would like to know if my area Olympia SW has gotten warmer or dryer. This April we were almost 2.75" below normal. 

Your probably right can't imagine getter warmer without getting dryer. 

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13 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

I've heard both sides It will be wetter, or dryer, I would like to know if my area Olympia SW has gotten warmer or dryer. This April we were almost 2.75" below normal. 

Your probably right can't imagine getter warmer without getting dryer. 

https://washingtondnr.wordpress.com/2019/06/06/is-my-tree-dying-how-climate-change-and-drought-are-changing-the-landscape/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110222122725.htm

https://www.popsci.com/climate-change-salmon-pacific-northwest/

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21 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Yes, summers are dryer here and winter are wetter.  As far as warmth,  Chilean Fire Tree now blooms in mid May not early June.  Gingers also coming up in late April.  10 years ago they didn't start till late May.  Butia spears opening earlier. 

So winters wetter, spring/summers dryer and, Yes, waters are warmer too effecting the poor salmon runs. 

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Well we're getting warmer but definitely not wetter.  Fire season started a month ago if you can believe it.  We had rain about a week ago getting 0.2", which is the most we've had in some time.  I keep seeing showers in the forecast further out, but 35% chance isn't going to amount to anything.  Grass is already browning and I had to get my irrigation going a couple weeks ago.  Lots of snow on Mt Hood so at least there's that.  I know southern Oregon in some spots only have 22% of the snow pack they should.  Scary stuff.

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3 hours ago, Chester B said:

Well we're getting warmer but definitely not wetter.  Fire season started a month ago if you can believe it.  We had rain about a week ago getting 0.2", which is the most we've had in some time.  I keep seeing showers in the forecast further out, but 35% chance isn't going to amount to anything.  Grass is already browning and I had to get my irrigation going a couple weeks ago.  Lots of snow on Mt Hood so at least there's that.  I know southern Oregon in some spots only have 22% of the snow pack they should.  Scary stuff.

Waiting to hear tomorrow's update from the drought index / snow pack readings. Readings were down to 8%  -for the entire Sierra-  last week.   Bet we're at goose egg status now.  That is really scary for it only being mid May. 

Don't think there is anything left on any of the mountains here.. except maybe a shaded slope at the highest part of Mt. Graham, ..and / or Humphrey's Peak, just north of Flagstaff.  Any remaining patches of snow on Lemmon, east of Tucson are likely gone by now.

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12 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Waiting to hear tomorrow's update from the drought index / snow pack readings. Readings were down to 8%  -for the entire Sierra-  last week.   Bet we're at goose egg status now.  That is really scary for it only being mid May. 

Don't think there is anything left on any of the mountains here.. except maybe a shaded slope at the highest part of Mt. Graham, ..and / or Humphrey's Peak, just north of Flagstaff.  Any remaining patches of snow on Lemmon, east of Tucson are likely gone by now.

So where does you water come from?  Underground wells?

Portland gets it from Mt Hood, good chunk is from the Bull run watershed.  Here's the latest snow pack map.

image.png.829eb95a2f33e1c363fa9ebb463fe7a2.png

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2 minutes ago, Chester B said:

So where does you water come from?  Underground wells?

Portland gets it from Mt Hood, good chunk is from the Bull run watershed.  Here's the latest snow pack map.

image.png.829eb95a2f33e1c363fa9ebb463fe7a2.png

Here/ in a good chunk of S. Cal, most water comes from the Colorado River / C.R. Basin, then moved around via the CAP aqueducts -around AZ anyway.  Sierra Nevada water is moved around CA via the CA. Aqueduct. 

They've already announced both Lake Powell and Mead will fall below the much discussed critical thresholds this year, and that farmers just south of me, possibly Yuma ( wouldn't be surprised ) will likely face pretty serious water restrictions/ cuts shortly.. which means more bare fields to blow around when ( ..er, if, lol ) we have an " actual " Monsoon season later on.

Ground water locally / in Tucson appears to be alright, for now anyway since a good amount of that is supplied by the Verde and Salt River basin reservoirs which have fared slightly better, up until this year at least.  For the most part, people already take water conservation pretty seriously here so, unless things get really bad, - which is def. possible-, more significant cuts could be felt by everyone later.

Beyond water supply, it's how dry vegetation already is in much of CA that is pretty un-nerving.

 

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