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Coachella Valley Preserve / Thousand Palm Oasis, California


GoatLockerGuns

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Took a trip out to a Washingtonia filifera oasis this month.  I highly recommend it.  Easily accessible with some monster specimens.

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Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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2 hours ago, GoatLockerGuns said:

Took a trip out to a Washingtonia filifera oasis this month.  I highly recommend it.  Easily accessible with some monster specimens.

 

Awesome photos! I visited there in 2016, it was officially 'closed' as the outside temp was around 110 and unfortunately we only got there at around sundown.

How could we convince you to share full res photos somehow....? I would love some of those for my desktop background. Can never get enough of Cali Desert / Washingtonia photos.

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Wow, thank you for sharing!

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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I dont know everyone else's opinion, but I really like the full length skirts.

Great pictures.

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  • 2 months later...

Funny, I dont like the full skirts on palms most of the time. 

But here in their nature habitat they look like a million cousins ITs at a reunion!

Extreme fire danger, and rat heaven thou ;( which is why so many in California get trimmed or cut down.  

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On 4/3/2021 at 2:16 PM, amh said:

I dont know everyone else's opinion, but I really like the full length skirts.

Great pictures.

Mixed thoughts on this... Like some skirt on these,  full length might be a bit too much though in a small-ish yard.  Over trimmed is just awful and un -necessary.

As far as the " but the skirt will attract X unwanted animals..  Anything that provides shelter or nourishment will attract animals..  decaying organic material of the boots/ petioles.. debris trapped between them and the trunk will attract things that compost it, which in turn brings everyone else to the dinner table..

Skirts of these palms provide valuable real estate for native birds, at least a couple species of Bats, and food for numerous other things.  Rats, the ones we'd like to live without, are imported.. and can live anywhere. Can't think of any native rodents, with the exception of Squirrels that would make their homes up there.. Even if there were, pretty likely there may be some bird or reptile that eats rats renting space up there too. Nature is good at balancing things out when humans stop messing with everything..

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20 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Mixed thoughts on this... Like some skirt on these,  full length might be a bit too much though in a small-ish yard.  Over trimmed is just awful and un -necessary.

As far as the " but the skirt will attract X unwanted animals..  Anything that provides shelter or nourishment will attract animals..  decaying organic material of the boots/ petioles.. debris trapped between them and the trunk will attract things that compost it, which in turn brings everyone else to the dinner table..

Skirts of these palms provide valuable real estate for native birds, at least a couple species of Bats, and food for numerous other things.  Rats, the ones we'd like to live without, are imported.. and can live anywhere. Can't think of any native rodents, with the exception of Squirrels that would make their homes up there.. Even if there were, pretty likely there may be some bird or reptile that eats rats renting space up there too. Nature is good at balancing things out when humans stop messing with everything..

My biggest worry would be my local humidity causing disease problems. I have plenty of owl, fox, feral cats and snakes to control rodents.

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23 hours ago, amh said:

My biggest worry would be my local humidity causing disease problems. I have plenty of owl, fox, feral cats and snakes to control rodents.

Have thought about that.. While there are other examples  with a few, ( Papago Park / Phoenix Zoo, etc )  there's a park in Tucson (  Agua Caliente ) where, when you look through pictures of the place, numerous specimens of the dozens ( likely hundreds ) of filifera ( and robustas ) there are growing right at the edge of.. or are leaning out over ( w/ part of their trunks under ) water and a majority of skirts on those specimens there aren't removed and the palms look fantastic..  Saw a picture or two showing very young plants growing in standing water.  Yea the park is in the desert and drier overall than out your way but pretty sure the humidity in that particular spot would be higher than surrounding areas which i'd think could create some degree of environment for disease issues for those palms.. Interesting to think about regardless..

Would like to take a look at the place myself sometime before leaving AZ  -if the weather cooperates ( one of those days it is humid, cloudy ..and much more tolerable than right now lol ). 

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