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30 Year Old Washingtonias and Mature Date Palms in Charlotte, NC


NCFM

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Check out Palms R Kool's latest video where he shows off some off the palmage on Lake Wylie just outside of Charlotte. Crazy seeing this stuff so far from the coast! The lake must provide a great microclimate

 

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I saw that video I was suprised washias could survive that far north

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
~ Neil deGrasse Tyson

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18 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

Defintly really nice washies. He got a lot of palms in his garden in NC even Bismarck.

His Bismarck is amazing! Honestly I don't know how he does it. Phoenix canariensis, robustas, tall Sabal too.

BTW, he's in Fort Mill, SC.

Edited by Teegurr
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3 hours ago, Teegurr said:

His Bismarck is amazing! Honestly I don't know how he does it. Phoenix canariensis, robustas, tall Sabal too.

BTW, he's in Fort Mill, SC.

Well, just outside Fort Mill in a community called Tega Cay. It's right on the lake so that probably helps him some, but still amazing! His yard is going to be magnificent in a few years as long as we don't have any freak cold events. 

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I'm amazed at the Phoenix  and Washy palms  that don't look like they need protection there  . I protect my Washy at 15F , and I didn't have to protect  it  this year with a low of only  16F ,  but my fronds are all tan now after 16F . Those Washys had a lot of green on them . My Washy puts out 30 fronds a season so it looks good much of the year . 

I'm always watching the weather for some crazy cold coming down so I can protect the trunks and bud , but those are almost too tall to protect ? 

Very cool , but I just can't believe a 7A winter didn't take them out without protection .

 

Edited by Will Simpson
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20 minutes ago, Will Simpson said:

I bet you'd see some 7A temperatures in that area in the past 30 years  which why I don't quite get how they have survived longterm . That water can't make it that much more mild than other surrounding areas I would think ?

Thanks for posting .

Will

 

 

Edited by Will Simpson
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4 hours ago, NBTX11 said:

Looks more like a 15 year old Washingtonia to me.  They generally are about 1.5-2 times that tall in 30 years.

The smaller palm featured in the thumbnail is not the 30 year old specimen, if that's the one you're referring to. The larger palm is shown later on in the video, and the apparently the owner claims it has been there since the house was built about 30 years ago.  

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On 2/27/2021 at 8:21 PM, Teegurr said:

His Bismarck is amazing! Honestly I don't know how he does it. Phoenix canariensis, robustas, tall Sabal too.

BTW, he's in Fort Mill, SC.

Theres quite a few sabals in his neck of the woods around Charlotte, his sabal was pretty slow to establish if you watch some of his older vids, but seems like its starting to really take now.  Hes found some good butia in the region too.

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On 2/27/2021 at 7:21 PM, Teegurr said:

His Bismarck is amazing! Honestly I don't know how he does it. Phoenix canariensis, robustas, tall Sabal too.

BTW, he's in Fort Mill, SC.

He uses some protection when it gets really cold though. at least on his Canariensis and Bismarckia.

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3 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

He uses some protection when it gets really cold though. at least on his Canariensis and Bismarckia.

Yeah, but it's not much for his Bizzie. He just throws a cover on it and it miraculously doesn't get burned at 20, so pretty cool.

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6 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

He uses some protection when it gets really cold though. at least on his Canariensis and Bismarckia.

He uses spotlights on the washies, canaries, and bismarkias when needed. I wonder how much of a difference that actually makes? The lowest temp he saw this year was 19F, which is a mild low for the piedmont, but it was enough to do some minor damage to his bismarkias. 

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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On 2/28/2021 at 11:13 PM, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

He uses spotlights on the washies, canaries, and bismarkias when needed. I wonder how much of a difference that actually makes? The lowest temp he saw this year was 19F, which is a mild low for the piedmont, but it was enough to do some minor damage to his bismarkias. 

Well in fort mill any freezes we have are very short lived, only a few hours at most.

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  • 2 months later...
1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

Doesn't surprise me that somebody snatched it

It was probably a park ranger or environmental officer that jumped at the chance to exert their authority and dispose of that alien plant. A few years back I was growing some tomatoes and peppers in the woods, on public land, but someone ripped all my plants out. It definitely wasn't a deer as there were boot prints all over the area. Well I later found out it was a council/wildlife officer as I saw them patrolling that area and it was literally in the middle of nowhere.

I confronted the guy about it, since it was on public land, and he said it was his responsibility to remove non-native plants and animals. He didn't give a crap that it was just a couple of tomato and pepper plants, or that it was someone's little veg garden hobby during the pandemic lockdown. If I had planted palms there instead, he would have removed them too. He was super entitled, given that it was public land. But of course these 'officials' don't touch the non-native poison ivy that is growing out of control in the area. Surprise surprise. 

Then again, it could have just been some thief that dug it up and stole it, as you say. 

Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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It would seem  to me to that that is  one of the best inland microclimates in the upper Piedmont of SC and Southwest NC  ( Tega Cay is  1.5 miles from NC )  . Check out the map of that area and notice how much water there is around that location . Imagine a cold front coming down from the northwest and how much water it would cross before getting to Tega Cay . 

IMG_0069.thumb.JPG.83ecf44bf1fa6fe79bd3ca7cd694bbc4.JPG

 

Edited by Will Simpson
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I'm guessing that Washie was planted on 'Goat Island' then...?

Dry-summer Oceanic climate (9a)

Average annual precipitation - 18.7 inches : Average annual sunshine hours - 1725

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2 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

It was probably a park ranger or environmental officer that jumped at the chance to exert their authority and dispose of that alien plant. A few years back I was growing some tomatoes and peppers in the woods, on public land, but someone ripped all my plants out. It definitely wasn't a deer as there were boot prints all over the area. Well I later found out it was a council/wildlife officer as I saw them patrolling that area and it was literally in the middle of nowhere.

I confronted the guy about it, since it was on public land, and he said it was his responsibility to remove non-native plants and animals. He didn't give a crap that it was just a couple of tomato and pepper plants, or that it was someone's little veg garden hobby during the pandemic lockdown. If I had planted palms there instead, he would have removed them too. He was super entitled, given that it was public land. But of course these 'officials' don't touch the non-native poison ivy that is growing out of control in the area. Surprise surprise. 

Then again, it could have just been some thief that dug it up and stole it, as you say. 

Both are likely scenarios

Either way, it was snatched :D

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