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Queen Palm in Myrtle Beach?


General Sylvester D. Palm
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I've heard some people say that Queen Palms can live in Myrtle Beach. For all the years I've been here I've never seen any of them. Recently we've been having 9A-9B weather. So does anyone know the exact answer?

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6 minutes ago, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

I've heard some people say that Queen Palms can live in Myrtle Beach. For all the years I've been here I've never seen any of them. Recently we've been having 9A-9B weather. So does anyone know the exact answer?

Ahhh finally a fellow Myrtle Beach Palmtalker! There have been stories of people successfully keeping queens alive for years here but I have never seen one personally. I may get to add to the folklore down the road tho, i currently have a standard queen and a silver queen going through their first winter on my property. In the bullpen are 2 Uruguay queens that will be getting planted this spring. We'll see how it goes. Zone pushing is a hell of a drug.

Welcome to palmtalk :shaka-2:

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5 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

Ahhh finally a fellow Myrtle Beach Palmtalker! There have been stories of people successfully keeping queens alive for years here but I have never seen one personally. I may get to add to the folklore down the road tho, i currently have a standard queen and a silver queen going through their first winter on my property. In the bullpen are 2 Uruguay queens that will be getting planted this spring. We'll see how it goes. Zone pushing is a hell of a drug.

Welcome to palmtalk :shaka-2:

Ah yes! Good ole' Myrtle. I might plant my 4 foot Queen in the ground this spring. Do you think some parts of Myrtle could be zone 9A?

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Just now, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

Ah yes! Good ole' Myrtle. I might plant my 4 foot Queen in the ground this spring. Do you think some parts of Myrtle could be zone 9A?

I optimistically would like to say yes, especially in some well sited microclimates. I'll let you know how my zone 9 stuff does when we get an actual winter haha 

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3 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

I optimistically would like to say yes, especially in some well sited microclimates. I'll let you know how my zone 9 stuff does when we get an actual winter haha 

Thank you. I'll be interested to hear how they do.

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3 minutes ago, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

Ah yes! Good ole' Myrtle. I might plant my 4 foot Queen in the ground this spring. Do you think some parts of Myrtle could be zone 9A?

Considering that as recently as 2018 there was a low of 16f, with another night of 18f as well as several nights with lows of 19, and more in the low twenties, and only 3 years earlier the low was 18, I doubt a queen unprotected would last more then a few years...  

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2 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Considering that as recently as 2018 there was a low of 16f, with another night of 18f as well as several nights with lows of 19, and more in the low twenties, and only 3 years earlier the low was 18, I doubt a queen unprotected would last more then a few years...  

I agree. Any bad winter mine will get wrapped. The plan is to help them get some size so that they can possibly weather 8b temps. 

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6 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Considering that as recently as 2018 there was a low of 16f, with another night of 18f as well as several nights with lows of 19, and more in the low twenties, and only 3 years earlier the low was 18, I doubt a queen unprotected would last more then a few years...  

True. I bet that it would do just fine with protection though.

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If you're generally staying above 18-20 during most/all winters, then it's definitely possible.  Anything below 20 is dicey, but they can sometimes recover from as low as low to mid teens.

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Probably not, even the ones in Charleston don't look that good. But then again, that is after a bad winter.

Edited by EastCanadaTropicals

Nothing to say here. 

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35 minutes ago, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

True. I bet that it would do just fine with protection though.

Want to say there is a guy on here that lives in Virginia that has a queen. He wraps it up every year. It might be somewhere else; it’s been awhile since I’ve been in here. But it was definitely below an 8a zone. 

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Just now, Jcalvin said:

Want to say there is a guy on here that lives in Virginia that has a queen. He wraps it up every year. It might be somewhere else; it’s been awhile since I’ve been in here. But it was definitely below an 8a zone. 

I believe you're talking about @SEVA. He has one growing in 8a southeast Virginia, has to protect it most years. You can read more about it on this thread:  Virginia Palms - COLD HARDY PALMS - PalmTalk

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Why not just grow something that is more suitable to your climate? Have you not been reading any of the Texas threads? As you can see, 5 of the last 10 years a Queen may have been toast.

 

Screen Shot 2021-02-16 at 2.56.14 PM.png

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25 minutes ago, NorCalKing said:

Why not just grow something that is more suitable to your climate? Have you not been reading any of the Texas threads? As you can see, 5 of the last 10 years a Queen may have been toast.

 

Screen Shot 2021-02-16 at 2.56.14 PM.png

It'll be an uphill battle, yes. Would i suggest anyone plant a queen here in myrtle, no. We are a modest 8b that may be seeing a warming trend but it's not worth the risk for most people. I, however, am not most people and this is not most situations. When I started my yard project I wanted to see how diverse a landscape i could create while also keeping the new hobby challenging. Trying to successfully grow a queen in myrtle is in that sweet spot of doable under the right circumstances but difficult enough to keep it interesting. Myrtle is cold by many palm standards. Could a mature, established queen survive our winters continuously.... the answer is probably not. I'm just trying to see if the answer is maybe. 

Edited by DAVEinMB
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1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

It'll be an uphill battle, yes. Would i suggest anyone plant a queen here in myrtle, no. We are a modest 8b that may be seeing a warming trend but it's not worth the risk for most people. I, however, am not most people and this is not most situations. When I started my yard project I wanted to see how diverse a landscape i could create while also keeping the new hobby challenging. Trying to successfully grow a queen in myrtle is in that sweet spot of doable under the right circumstances but difficult enough to keep it interesting. Myrtle is cold by many palm standards. Could a mature, established queen survive our winters continuously.... the answer is probably not. I'm just trying to see if the answer is maybe. 

Do it. Queens are so relatively cheap that, even if one does every 3rd or 4th year with protection, you can always just buy another one. 

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1 minute ago, Jcalvin said:

Do it. Queens are so relatively cheap that, even if one does every 3rd or 4th year with protection, you can always just buy another one. 

I do the same with kings. They grow so fast and are easy to grow from seed so why not use them as a short term perennial.

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While you will definitely have to protect it at some point, I say why not. If I lived in Myrtle Beach I would plant all kinds of things that have a similar hardiness to queen palms. I would also make sure to enjoy the palms I didn’t have to worry about as well, especially palmettos! 

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PalmTreeDude

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13 minutes ago, palmbrad said:

I do the same with kings. They grow so fast and are easy to grow from seed so why not use them as a short term perennial.

Do you have any pictures of them? I have a small one in my yard right now with some heat. 

PalmTreeDude

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7 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Do you have any pictures of them? I have a small one in my yard right now with some heat. 

I will have to take some. I have 3 that are going through their 3rd winter in ground. I wrap the trunks with blankets if we get down to the mid 20s.

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I planned my Yard and garden with mostly hardy palms and a few marginals and kept palms alive like queens for years in zone 8b. Only to have a 50/100 year freeze that appears to have taken not only the marginal but the hardy. 
It’s going to be a big bill to get these removed. A $10 Washington 20 years ago will cost excess of $1000 to remove now, multiply that by so many palms.

Edited by Collectorpalms
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30 Year Zone Average 20F. Ryan: Contact 979.204.4161 Collectorpalms@gmail.com

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48 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

I planned my Yard and garden with mostly hardy palms and a few marginals and kept palms alive like queens for years in zone 8b. Only to have a 50/100 year freeze that appears to have taken not only the marginal but the hardy. 
It’s going to be a big bill to get these removed. A $10 Washington 20 years ago will cost excess of $1000 to remove now, multiply that by so many palms.

Wait till June or so before you cut any of those big boys!  You never know.  Also look into trying trunk cutting.

Edited by Allen
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Youtube (TN Tropics) 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), louisiana(5), palmetto (1)  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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6 hours ago, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

I've heard some people say that Queen Palms can live in Myrtle Beach. For all the years I've been here I've never seen any of them. Recently we've been having 9A-9B weather. So does anyone know the exact answer?

I have seen a few queen palms in Augusta ga, they look pretty winter fried though. There were 3 moderately large ones in a yard unprotected, a quite large phoenix palm about half a miles from me looks in fantastic shape, deep green fronds. Augusta has been lately having 9a/9b winters too but seeing what happened in Texas is giving me time for pause, if that happened here all washingtonias, phoenixs and many palmettos would be toast.

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Why not grow a mule? They are hardier than a queen and look better IMO.

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"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
~ Neil deGrasse Tyson

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1 hour ago, climate change virginia said:

Why not grow a mule? They are hardier than a queen and look better IMO.

Underused here for sure but they do require some work to keep alive. Closer to an 8b palm than a queen but since they aren't in the "set and forget" category most people don't want to deal with them. 

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1 hour ago, climate change virginia said:

Why not grow a mule? They are hardier than a queen and look better IMO.

I most likely will be getting a Mule Palm some time. They look really good too. I just want something that you don't see here often in Myrtle. I honestly don't mind covering them up at all.

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7 minutes ago, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

I most likely will be getting a Mule Palm some time. They look really good too. I just want something that you don't see here often in Myrtle. I honestly don't mind covering them up at all.

Southern Scapes on 501 had mules in stock last month. 15 gallon i believe

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4 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

Southern Scapes on 501 had mules in stock last month. 15 gallon i believe

Thanks! I might have to go check it out.

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I had a queen survive two winters in Murrells Inlet. Eventually it got freeze dried and died.

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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21 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Do you have any pictures of them? I have a small one in my yard right now with some heat. 

Fronds are beat up after a 24 degree low this year.

EEE7DCAA-5057-47C2-AC3A-B91470AD5EA8.jpeg

AADB6FFA-0DF5-4039-B4EB-E65B9B058E3D.jpeg

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20 hours ago, palmbrad said:

Fronds are beat up after a 24 degree low this year.

EEE7DCAA-5057-47C2-AC3A-B91470AD5EA8.jpeg

AADB6FFA-0DF5-4039-B4EB-E65B9B058E3D.jpeg

Maybe cover them up if you don't want to have to keep buying them. Pretty much anything can live there if covered.

Edited by General Sylvester D. Palm
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2 hours ago, General Sylvester D. Palm said:

Maybe cover them up if you don't want to have to keep buying them. Pretty much anything can live there if covered.

I wrap the trunks if in mid 20s just not all of the fronds. Eventually though we will have a bad year and the cold will get them or I will let the cold get them before they get too big for me to remove easily :)

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5 hours ago, palmbrad said:

I wrap the trunks if in mid 20s just not all of the fronds. Eventually though we will have a bad year and the cold will get them or I will let the cold get them before they get too big for me to remove easily :)

why not the fronds?

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
~ Neil deGrasse Tyson

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9 hours ago, climate change virginia said:

why not the fronds?

If I can’t reach without a ladder I often don’t protect beyond that anymore in addition to running out of blankets or frost cloth.. 

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45 minutes ago, palmbrad said:

If I can’t reach without a ladder I often don’t protect beyond that anymore in addition to running out of blankets or frost cloth.. 

oh that makes sense

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
~ Neil deGrasse Tyson

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On 2/17/2021 at 6:10 PM, palmbrad said:

Fronds are beat up after a 24 degree low this year.

EEE7DCAA-5057-47C2-AC3A-B91470AD5EA8.jpeg

AADB6FFA-0DF5-4039-B4EB-E65B9B058E3D.jpeg

That’s really cool! Hopefully mine grows faster this year, it’s still super small like I said but I would love for it to get to that size. Thanks for showing some pictures. 

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PalmTreeDude

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On 2/20/2021 at 10:38 AM, PalmTreeDude said:

That’s really cool! Hopefully mine grows faster this year, it’s still super small like I said but I would love for it to get to that size. Thanks for showing some pictures. 

Mine have liked plenty of water. I often give them a slow drip drink with a 5 gallon bucket of water and a little fish fertilizer.

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  • 3 weeks later...

People ask, why not plant a mule instead of a Queen?

I'll give you two reasons: cost and availability. A 6 foot mule costs about $300 and is a specialty item. I can get a 6 foot queen for under $50 within 20 minutes from Lowes.

That being said, if you live in a place where it is likely to reach 20F within a few years, The mule is worth the trouble in the long run. Keep in mind if it gets cold enough, your mule may succumb too.

And can anyone finally answer if there is such a thing as cold resistant Queen Palm? By that I mean a legit'Silver Queen' that could take a temperature into the middle teens? If so, where would you get one? - no marketing hype please.

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22 minutes ago, Sabal_Louisiana said:

And can anyone finally answer if there is such a thing as cold resistant Queen Palm? By that I mean a legit'Silver Queen' that could take a temperature into the middle teens? If so, where would you get one? - no marketing hype please.

MPOM (Mule Palms of Mississippi) for silver

Woodlanders for Uruguay

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On 2/16/2021 at 4:57 PM, NorCalKing said:

Why not just grow something that is more suitable to your climate? Have you not been reading any of the Texas threads? As you can see, 5 of the last 10 years a Queen may have been toast.

 

Screen Shot 2021-02-16 at 2.56.14 PM.png

That is not Queen climate.they are zone 9 plants.  Anything less than 20 will damage them.  Less than 20 in successive winters will do them in.  Many didn't survive in in San Antonio when we got down to 19 in 2011. 

Butia is a better option.

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On 2/17/2021 at 5:10 PM, palmbrad said:

Fronds are beat up after a 24 degree low this year.

EEE7DCAA-5057-47C2-AC3A-B91470AD5EA8.jpeg

AADB6FFA-0DF5-4039-B4EB-E65B9B058E3D.jpeg

Are you sure those are queens (Syagrus)?  They look more like kings (Archontophoenix).  I wouldn't expect much leaf damage to Syagrus at 24° but I'd expect a near death experience for Archontophoenix.

Jon Sunder

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