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Palmageddon Aftermath Photo Thread


ahosey01

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Is there any documented surviving unprotected queens in SA or Austin? there was a few in Houston and surrounding suburbs. 

Lucas

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Unfortunately the large Bismarckia at Caldwell nursery has not recovered after Palmageddon. Apparently it flushed out a decent set of leaves towards the end of last year and then declined over winter. There's still some green in there but it appears to be on the way out. 

The Arenga engleri in the ground looked ok, and they had a lot of large palms in stock - mostly Arengas, Triangles, Queens, and Mules.

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11 hours ago, Little Tex said:

Is there any documented surviving unprotected queens in SA or Austin? there was a few in Houston and surrounding suburbs.

I am not aware of any.  All of the Queens I knew of bit the dust.  I think there is an entire thread on Queen palms in SA:

 

Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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More volunteer shots, this time along the San Antonio River north of downtown.  These pictures were taken yesterday on a hike I took in and around Brackenridge Park.

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First up, what appear to be Rhapidophyllum hystrix.  They are not really planted with any design in mind that I could see, so if they are not volunteers, then they may be some sort of "gorilla" planting/seeding on public land.  Near one of these palms, somebody constructed a makeshift feline homeless campsite.

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The rest of these are Sabal sp. volunteers.  Some of these are really big.  Most have very long petioles and massively large, spreading crowns.  I placed my hat on some of the fronds for scale.

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Not sure if this was an ornamental planting or a volunteer, but it was massive.  Car and person in background for scale:

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Some obvious (and very old) ornamental plantings in the nearby park.  The palm on the left of the first picture (foreground) looks like it might be a Washingtonia sp.:

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A nice looking clump of Chamaerops humilis var. humilis in a median strip nearby.  Looks like three of six trunking specimens in this clump survived the 2021 freeze event, along with some new suckers coming up.

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Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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On 3/9/2022 at 6:23 PM, knikfar said:

Beautiful photos! Seeing all the surviving CIDP, I’m wondering if a CIDP x Butia x Jubaea hybrid might produce something super hardy. Assuming that combo is even possible 

I don't think so, CIDP are in a different family than Butia and Jubaea

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Lucas

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Urban Houston is almost back to "normal" again if you ignore the dead trunks and absence of queens...

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Jonathan

Katy, TX (Zone 9a)

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Here’s my front yard Filifera. This was about a month ago so basically a year post freeze. I lost a skyduster Robusta twice as tall as this. I recently planted 4 new Filifera seedlings throughout my front and back yards. I’m done worrying about freezes. I love the way they look anyways. 

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On 4/1/2022 at 5:55 PM, Little Tex said:

I don't think so, CIDP are in a different family than Butia and Jubaea

I think, technically, they are in the same Family; namely, the Arecaceae family.  I assume the intent of this comment was to address the degrees of separation that would make a hybrid from the Phoenix Genus highly unlikely with those from the Butia or Jubaea Genera.  In that case, I concur.  While in the same Family, they are in different Subfamilies, Tribes/Subtribes.  I believe the taxonomic separation between the aforementioned Genera look as follows:

Arecaceae (Family)

-Arecoideae (Subfamily)

--Cocoseae (Tribe)

---Attaleinae (Subtribe)

----Butia (Genus)

----Jubaea (Genus)

-Coryphoideae (Subfamily)

--Phoeniceae (Tribe)

---Phoenix (Genus)

As I understand it, because Butia and Jubeae are in the same Subtribe, they are more closely related and have better luck at hybridization.  The same can be said for other Genera in the Attaleinae Subtribe, like Syagrus for example.  At least, that is what I understand from the research I have read.

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Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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Seeing the sabals in this thread reinforces owning them, and LOTS of them for this exact reason!  love it.

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Subscribe to my YouTube here  to follow along my Sabal obsession....  Quite possibly one of the biggest Sabal plantings in the US.

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/sabalking.texas

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On 3/26/2022 at 6:59 PM, amh said:

Off topic, but about how many red buckeyes are growing in the area?

I believe there are some Yellow Buckeyes (Aesculus pavia var. flavescens) at Friedrich Wilderness Park (29.636746, -98.630850).

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Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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Some pics from Plano/Richardson area. Sabal Mexicana continues to be the winner in these parts. 
 

pic 1: 5 dead palmetto trunks

pic 2: 2 dead Filifera trunks and one live Sabal Mexicana 

pic 3: Sabal Mexicana 

pic 4: 2 x Sabal mexicana

pic 5: Sabal Mexicana 

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Edited by DreaminAboutPalms
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More palm survivors in Dallas. One year after the deep freeze one growing season accomplished. Last winters low was 20F

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B. Armata, and Sabal Louisiana , 2 months after and 14 months after a low  of 3F, with 10 consecutive days below freezing in Dallas. 

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C. Humilis cerifera and B. Armata 2 months after and 14 months after slow of 3F, with 10 consecutive days below freezing in Dallas.

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On 3/26/2022 at 9:10 PM, Little Tex said:

Is there any documented surviving unprotected queens in SA or Austin? there was a few in Houston and surrounding suburbs. 

Not that I’m aware of. I saw one that tried to push something but when I went back a couple months later it was gone. Probably died. 

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4 hours ago, Cade said:

Dead Filifera and a decent looking robusta 

 

 

Houston suburbs (9B)

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Washington Filifera 9b? What intersection suburb town is this? They are just not as reliable in a humid wet environment after they have been through an extreme event. I experienced this first hand. Some made it, middle single digits but then declined the following spring/summer. Surprised any died outright from the cold in 9b, the combo of rain humidity soil type and moderate winter damage has to be to blame.

Edited by Collectorpalms
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Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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On 4/5/2022 at 8:54 PM, Jesse PNW said:

@TonyDFW I'm assuming you protected that ButiaxJubaea x Syagrus during the 3f incident? 

He doesn’t often reply to individual questions, though I did get him to reply to a personal message! but I did see him say he protected some things like the Jubaea, so I have to assume he could have or it was covered in a snow drift, or maybe the growing bud was still underground. My much larger one died unprotected. It was a rather weakling hybrid palm I do not miss. 

Edited by Collectorpalms

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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On 4/7/2022 at 5:58 PM, TonyDFW said:


Another washingtoniana we planted survived 2021 I’m Dallas as a seedling. 

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Do you think the location helped? lol 

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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Do you think the location next to walls or buildings helped. Naw! 

Edited by Collectorpalms

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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On 4/9/2022 at 11:01 PM, Meangreen94z said:

Interesting, how do you mean? 

Edited by Collectorpalms

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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