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Unusual Indoor Palm


mxcolin

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I'm looking for some unusual ideas for an inside Palm. There won't be a huge amount of natural light but enough to make do. I already have the following indoors:

  • Majesty
  • Coconut
  • Kentia
  • Cat
  • Areca

Any other ideas on what I could plant indoors? I might add some UV lights to make it possible. I'm looking for something you wouldn't normally see grown indoors.

Thoughts?

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An uncommon Rhapis, i.e., subtilis or humilis or a variegated or wide leaf green 'Koban' excelsa. If you already have a Howea forsteriana, why not add an H. belmoreana?

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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3 hours ago, mxcolin said:

I'm looking for some unusual ideas for an inside Palm.

Along with Meg's suggestion of a fan palm, you could also try Cryosophila warscewiczii if you can find one.  According to Palmpedia:

This palm is susceptible to hot, dry winds, but has some good frost tolerance, as well as tolerance of low light situations, making it an excellent indoor palm, and fast growing. It seems totally resistant to spider mites, which are the bane of most indoor palm species. Hardiness, USDA zones 9b-11, tolerates 26 F.

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Jon Sunder

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I like Pritchardia hillebrandii,  and Caryota mitis (Fishtail palms), and Foxtail palms. Yes, Rhapis (Lady palms). my favorites! 

Hyophorbes (Spinde and Bottle palms) are also all easy in the house!

Edited by oasis371
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If you’re capable of keeping a coconut happy indoors, you should be able to handle a licuala or two! (Or three! Haha why not!?) There are many varieties and none really look much like any other species of palm outside licuala, so they always look attractive in groups of several varieties within the licuala family. Peltata, peltata var. sumawongii (aka elegans), and grandis are the most common types and they don’t require a ton of light. Just warmth and humidity similar to a coconut. 

As several other folks mentioned, lady palms do well indoors too, though they’re fairly common and I wouldn’t consider them unusual to see indoors as I would licualas which are fairly unique overall. They’re basically bulletproof, though. I had one I neglected REAL hard when I had a stint up north for a year in low light over a dark, long New Hampshire winter and it never even batted an eye. 

Edited by chad2468emr

Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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You could also add to your Chamaedorea collection, there as so many species.

Try Chamaedorea metalica, it's bulletproof and even offers a good degree of drought and cold tolerance, surprisingly so.

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Since I feel like being silly this morning, you should try to grow Paschalococos disperta and see how it goes.

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"Ph'nglui mglw'napalma Funkthulhu R'Lincolnea wgah'palm fhtagn"
"In his house at Lincoln, dread Funkthulhu plants palm trees."

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I keep Adonidia merrillii, Dypsis lutescens, Livistona chinensis, Phoenix roebelenii, Roystonea regia, Thrinax radiata, and Wodyetia bifurcata, as semi-permanent houseplants (I put some of them outside under a covered patio during spring, summer, and fall).  I attended a catholic church in Thousand Oaks, California once, and they had an interesting potted palm setup.  They had a bunch of medium sized Syagrus romanzoffiana in pots that were strategically positioned all around the interior next to windows.  They were all about 6 to 7 feet high, with 4 foot plus pinnate fronds drooping everywhere.  I thought it looked awesome the way the staff had presented them.  I was inspired by their interior landscaping design, and I am currently growing a Syagrus romanzoffiana for that purpose myself (mine is currently only about 1 foot tall now).  I think most palms can serve as houseplants (for a time at least), as long as you give them what they need to survive.  Pictured below are some palms I having growing in my master bathroom (south facing, privacy tinted window).  From left to right they are: Wodyetia bifurcata, Dypsis lutescens (3), and Adonidia merrillii.

image.thumb.png.de2c054c041c51759c0f9b32d3cf648a.png

Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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These are awesome. Getting anything other than the usual varieties is difficult around here. There is a place in San Francisco that does some more exotic varieties. Where do you guys get the more exotic varieties? Do you buy them online? I'd love a Roystonea regia as a house plant but you just can't find them anywhere here.

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On 1/6/2021 at 6:29 PM, oasis371 said:

I like Pritchardia hillebrandii,  and Caryota mitis (Fishtail palms), and Foxtail palms. Yes, Rhapis (Lady palms). my favorites! 

Hyophorbes (Spinde and Bottle palms) are also all easy in the house!

I have a Fishtail, forgot about that. It's doing really well. I'd love a Foxtail but again they are super hard to find here.

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1 hour ago, mxcolin said:

These are awesome. Getting anything other than the usual varieties is difficult around here. There is a place in San Francisco that does some more exotic varieties. Where do you guys get the more exotic varieties? Do you buy them online? I'd love a Roystonea regia as a house plant but you just can't find them anywhere here.

With the exception of the Wodyetia bifurcata, I grew all of the ones pictured from seed (I got the Wodyetia bifurcata as a seedling from @Fusca).  I try to get fresh seed when I can (mostly from trips to visit my Dad in Cape Coral, Florida); however, I buy online from time to time as well.  It also helps to know fellow Palmtalkers that are local, and that you can trade with.  I used to live in Vacaville, California, and I feel your pain concerning local selections.  If you want already established exotic juveniles, then you ought to take a drive down south, and check out some of the nurseries around Santa Barbara, L.A., or San Diego.  You may find some options at the nurseries in San Francisco, the East Bay, or Marin County as well.  I can't remember the name of it, but there was a nursery in Napa that I really liked and sold some cool stuff.

Unified Theory of Palm Seed Germination

image.png.2a6e16e02a0a8bfb8a478ab737de4bb1.png

(Where: bh = bottom heat, fs = fresh seed, L = love, m = magic, p = patience, and t = time)

DISCLAIMER: Working theory; not yet peer reviewed.

"Fronds come and go; the spear is life!" - Anonymous Palmtalker

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4 minutes ago, GoatLockerGuns said:

With the exception of the Wodyetia bifurcata, I grew all of the ones pictured from seed (I got the Wodyetia bifurcata as a seedling from @Fusca).  I try to get fresh seed when I can (mostly from trips to visit my Dad in Cape Coral, Florida); however, I buy online from time to time as well.  It also helps to know fellow Palmtalkers that are local, and that you can trade with.  I used to live in Vacaville, California, and I feel your pain concerning local selections.  If you want already established exotic juveniles, then you ought to take a drive down south, and check out some of the nurseries around Santa Barbara, L.A., or San Diego.  You may find some options at the nurseries in San Francisco, the East Bay, or Marin County as well.  I can't remember the name of it, but there was a nursery in Napa that I really liked and sold some cool stuff.

Flora Grubb in San Francisco has some really good exotic varieties. Yeah I'm considering a drive south to look at some more exotic small palms. I'd love a small Royal.

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9 hours ago, mxcolin said:

These are awesome. Getting anything other than the usual varieties is difficult around here. There is a place in San Francisco that does some more exotic varieties. Where do you guys get the more exotic varieties? Do you buy them online? I'd love a Roystonea regia as a house plant but you just can't find them anywhere here.

I live in FL now, but when I tinkered in palms up north I’d often use eBay. Honestly, I still use it now occasionally when I’m looking for something small and really specific that I can’t seem to find elsewhere 

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Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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On 1/11/2021 at 6:20 PM, chad2468emr said:

I live in FL now, but when I tinkered in palms up north I’d often use eBay. Honestly, I still use it now occasionally when I’m looking for something small and really specific that I can’t seem to find elsewhere 

Damn, eBay is a great idea. Never thought of that, took a look and there's some really interesting options on there. Thanks!!!

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  • 3 months later...
On 1/11/2021 at 9:29 AM, GoatLockerGuns said:

I keep Adonidia merrillii, Dypsis lutescens, Livistona chinensis, Phoenix roebelenii, Roystonea regia, Thrinax radiata, and Wodyetia bifurcata, as semi-permanent houseplants (I put some of them outside under a covered patio during spring, summer, and fall).  I attended a catholic church in Thousand Oaks, California once, and they had an interesting potted palm setup.  They had a bunch of medium sized Syagrus romanzoffiana in pots that were strategically positioned all around the interior next to windows.  They were all about 6 to 7 feet high, with 4 foot plus pinnate fronds drooping everywhere.  I thought it looked awesome the way the staff had presented them.  I was inspired by their interior landscaping design, and I am currently growing a Syagrus romanzoffiana for that purpose myself (mine is currently only about 1 foot tall now).  I think most palms can serve as houseplants (for a time at least), as long as you give them what they need to survive.  Pictured below are some palms I having growing in my master bathroom (south facing, privacy tinted window).  From left to right they are: Wodyetia bifurcata, Dypsis lutescens (3), and Adonidia merrillii.

image.thumb.png.de2c054c041c51759c0f9b32d3cf648a.png

 

DE720979-41F8-4423-A392-63BE5A482163.jpeg

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I have to add Arenga engleri to my above list. The Dwarf Sugar palm is not only easy indoor or indoor/outdoors or outdoors (given the right conditions), it's also very cold tolerant for a pinnate palm (one of the cold hardiest of the pinnate palms).  In fact, I overwinter my own in a pretty cold garage in the North. It's also a strong ,clustering species (in fact, they are kin to Fishtails, another one of my house favorites).

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On 4/25/2021 at 6:32 PM, oasis371 said:

I have to add Arenga engleri to my above list. The Dwarf Sugar palm is not only easy indoor or indoor/outdoors or outdoors (given the right conditions), it's also very cold tolerant for a pinnate palm (one of the cold hardiest of the pinnate palms).  In fact, I overwinter my own in a pretty cold garage in the North. It's also a strong ,clustering species (in fact, they are kin to Fishtails, another one of my house favorites).

:hmm: I'm intrigued. Always looking to add something new and different. Still have room in my office and somehow have room in my apartment for something that doesn't need tons of bright light. 

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8 hours ago, JohnAndSancho said:

:hmm: I'm intrigued. Always looking to add something new and different. Still have room in my office and somehow have room in my apartment for something that doesn't need tons of bright light. 

Rhapis Sps, John.

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Greetings, Luís

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I have A LOT of indoor palms. Some are a real struggle.

For ME? the easiest species that I have (and I have quite a few of them) is Dypsis pembana

Easy care,  Have never seen a spider mite web on any of them. Fast growers(for indoors) they do like water though.  Only extra care I give mine are a shower to get dust off fronds.

Lot's of Chamaedorea species work well as well, but they seem to attract spider mites and I have to keep mine on the dry side to be happy.

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2 hours ago, sashaeffer said:

For ME? the easiest species that I have (and I have quite a few of them) is Dypsis pembana

Really? Pembana? That's great to know! Can you post some pics, please? And enlighten us by sharing your experience?

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Greetings, Luís

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@sashaeffer i'd love to see them too. I've got a few Chamaedorea species scattered around, most are really happy except for the little Cataractarum I almost killed. It's declining pretty fast on my patio and is probably on palm hospice. 

 

12 hours ago, lzorrito said:

Rhapis Sps, John.

 

I've got an Excelsea that seems to love being neglected. 

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2 hours ago, JohnAndSancho said:

@oasis371 how fast are your sugar palms growing under indoor conditions? Same question for you @sashaeffer with your Pembanas. 

Hey John, hopefully Scott will post some pics as well but I thought I'd throw in my 2¢.  First pic is a double Dypsis pembana x madagascariensis F2 grown from seed indoors for around 2 years with 4-5 leaves.  Second pic is Arenga engleri also grown from seed indoors for roughly the same time.  Neither are particularly fast but the pembana hybrids are definitely faster.  I lost several of the pembana hybrids that I had on my back patio to a rat (now deceased!)

 

rsz_dypsis_pembana_hybrids.jpg

rsz_arenga_engleri.jpg

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Jon Sunder

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Dypsis Pembana

I have many, here are a few.

 

all from Floribunda 

As far as speed?  All are steady growers, meaning no change during winter like a lot of other palms I have that either slow way down or don't grow at all.

Now, like mentioned above ALL are from Floribunda so came in their own pots with volcanic "soil" so I HAVE to water them weekly. One time, I skipped a week and one of them had fronds turn brown right away, so they love their water.

 

7449959C-E778-4231-8851-FC7EE7552BDD.jpeg

673FC243-0728-4870-8CAF-9593165FB716.jpeg

24B9B385-7A63-447B-8532-E261ADCC2F55.jpeg

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23 hours ago, JohnAndSancho said:

I've got an Excelsea that seems to love being neglected.

So, you see what I mean.:greenthumb: Try others Sps like multifida and/or humilis.

Greetings, Luís

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1 hour ago, lzorrito said:

So, you see what I mean.:greenthumb: Try others Sps like multifida and/or humilis.

I just took on a ridiculous car payment so I'm shopping the forum looking for people who ship :(

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@Fusca with the vintage Popeyes planter lol. I moved my 2 Xmas seeds to a Jack in the Box and a Taco Bell cup. I sacrificed my fancy wine glasses for them. 

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I did really well with a CIDP inside - no joke.   The only issue I had was that it was getting real big.  I would put it out at my pool for summer and bring it in from late Sept and bring it back out in some time in May or June.  They can handle the dry conditions inside with no issues.

Plus Livistona chinensis was very easy and didn't mind shadier spots in my current house.

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6 hours ago, Chester B said:

I did really well with a CIDP inside - no joke.   The only issue I had was that it was getting real big.  I would put it out at my pool for summer and bring it in from late Sept and bring it back out in some time in May or June.  They can handle the dry conditions inside with no issues.

Plus Livistona chinensis was very easy and didn't mind shadier spots in my current house.

I have an l. Chinesis clump on my patio. $10 find at my local Kroger. If i can find a cheap cidp I'm down. 

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  • 2 years later...
On 1/11/2021 at 8:29 PM, GoatLockerGuns said:

I keep Adonidia merrillii, Dypsis lutescens, Livistona chinensis, Phoenix roebelenii, Roystonea regia, Thrinax radiata, and Wodyetia bifurcata, as semi-permanent houseplants (I put some of them outside under a covered patio during spring, summer, and fall).  I attended a catholic church in Thousand Oaks, California once, and they had an interesting potted palm setup.  They had a bunch of medium sized Syagrus romanzoffiana in pots that were strategically positioned all around the interior next to windows.  They were all about 6 to 7 feet high, with 4 foot plus pinnate fronds drooping everywhere.  I thought it looked awesome the way the staff had presented them.  I was inspired by their interior landscaping design, and I am currently growing a Syagrus romanzoffiana for that purpose myself (mine is currently only about 1 foot tall now).  I think most palms can serve as houseplants (for a time at least), as long as you give them what they need to survive.  Pictured below are some palms I having growing in my master bathroom (south facing, privacy tinted window).  From left to right they are: Wodyetia bifurcata, Dypsis lutescens (3), and Adonidia merrillii.

image.thumb.png.de2c054c041c51759c0f9b32d3cf648a.png

Palm Living Interior

I just took a lot of time and more money than I was hoping to spend to redo my bedroom. I like it a lot (and oh man, do I wish I had before and afters) but something is missing. Im just looking for suggestions and comments from people who are good with this type of thing.

Some comments/ideas/questions/concerns:
1. Lighting on top of mini fridge seems too close together, I put two more in front of them, even closer together though and I think it looks a little better, leaving the Wii just visible completely.
2. I have dark brown shelfs w/ white plastic mounts im thinking of putting above the fridge for maybe the lighting (worried the wires may look ugly though) and bottle of wine, or maybe the wii also, but again, wires.
3. I feel like the fridge may look either out of place, or at least too close to the dresser, and if nothing else maybe both of them should move to the left.
4. Dresser needs to be replaced, I dont think I can save the damage I did to the one drawer as you can probably see.

Those are some of the things bugging me about the room still and that I want to address but im open to ALL comments and suggestions.
Thanks so much!

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