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Silas_Sancona

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16 hours ago, teddytn said:

Forgot until now, what temps did TX hit during this early heatwave?

We only saw about 96°F(predicted 98°F)in Austin from what I saw. But it looks like South Texas hit their forecast.

8255BD97-45D2-49EB-B522-012ABAD98D02.jpeg

0F5E6662-B414-49E3-ABAD-E24D369B9D16.jpegAccording to this article the official high ended up being 109°F

https://www.foxweather.com/weather-news/texas-town-mcallen-sizzles-record-108-degree-heat-april.amp

9F609891-2B08-41B9-AC4A-DF4C984CC80F.thumb.jpeg.a50636c0ce8a3083aff291d553e1548a.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Meangreen94z said:

We only saw about 96°F(predicted 98°F)in Austin from what I saw. But it looks like South Texas hit their forecast.

108, 109 seems crazy to me period, but in early April is wild. Even 96 in Austin, I’m sure it’s still dropping into the 50-60’s at night there if not lower. Wow

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It is pretty crazy. I was surprised to see their previous April record of 107°F was set just in 2014. McAllen is extremely far south though at 26.2° N longitude, about equal to Fort Lauderdale in Florida.

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18 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

A day or two between 100- 108F ..here and there thru the summer   is one thing   ..Try on 4 ( ..or 5 ) months where 15 or more days -each month- are 105F+,   then give the experience a star rating..  **Added caveat,  ..it only cools off to only about 80F at night during the worst part of summer.

On the more optimistic end, would bet your experience would only earn 2 stars   ..out of 5, haha..

Hi Nathan,  believe it or not, I still would love to have these temps. I feel pretty fine in hot temps.  I would rate it 3 to 4 stars.

Eckhard

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11 minutes ago, Palmensammler said:

Hi Nathan,  believe it or not, I still would love to have these temps. I feel pretty fine in hot temps.  I would rate it 3 to 4 stars.

Eckhard

You might think that,  ..your body may see things much differently, esp after several weeks of 110F and 5 -20% humidity..

There's a good reason they've started to close hiking trails around Phoenix on days it is 110F or hotter, and fine people $$$ if caught hiking w/ dogs when it is over 100F..  Should fine people for having to rescue them when they decide to hike when it is that hot too..

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12 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

You might think that,  ..your body may see things much differently, esp after several weeks of 110F and 5 -20% humidity..

There's a good reason they've started to close hiking trails around Phoenix on days it is 110F or hotter, and fine people $$$ if caught hiking w/ dogs when it is over 100F..  Should fine people for having to rescue them when they decide to hike when it is that hot too..

July in Kuwait is no joke. 115-120f normal. Not too much getting done in temps like that. Some people said it would go 130-140f on occasion there. No thank you lol. 80-90 for me please. As far as plants go, can see 110 and above starting to wreak as much havoc as freezing cold can do I would think. 

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5 minutes ago, teddytn said:

July in Kuwait is no joke. 115-120f normal. Not too much getting done in temps like that. Some people said it would go 130-140f on occasion there. No thank you lol. 80-90 for me please. As far as plants go, can see 110 and above starting to wreak as much havoc as freezing cold can do I would think. 

Oh it does..  Agave can burn ..or cook to death ( had several do that, both in the ground / containers ).. Same w/ many cacti, inc. Saguaros ( among all sorts of stuff ) . Very few cacti will naturally grow on bare ground where fully exposed to all day sun.  Had candles on the dining room table - inside the house- start melting on the hottest afternoons one summer when the AC is off (  to conserve energy during  peak demand / 3-6PM time frame )

Obviously, such effects of the heat are amplified in town, vs. out in less developed areas, or the desert itself where it typically will be a little cooler, esp. in the evenings.. Foothill areas are good too, as long as you're still in an area that won't experience hard freezes in the winter.

The perfect summer here is one like last year ..Hot starting off,  then reasonable ...90s - low 100s w/ some days in the 80s.. more often than anything above 108F   ..and wet.  Summers like 2020 are just awful, on everything.

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4 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Oh it does..  Agave can burn ..or cook to death ( had several do that, both in the ground / containers ).. Same w/ many cacti, inc. Saguaros ( among all sorts of stuff ) . Very few cacti will naturally grow on bare ground where fully exposed to all day sun.  Had candles on the dining room table - inside the house- start melting on the hottest afternoons one summer when the AC is off (  to conserve energy during  peak demand / 3-6PM time frame )

Obviously, such effects of the heat are amplified in town, vs. out in less developed areas, or the desert itself where it typically will be a little cooler, esp. in the evenings.. Foothill areas are good too, as long as you're still in an area that won't experience hard freezes in the winter.

The perfect summer here is one like last year ..Hot starting off,  then reasonable ...90s - low 100s w/ some days in the 80s.. more often than anything above 108F   ..and wet.  Summers like 2020 are just awful, on everything.

Seeing plants in habitat and which ones survive can teach people that propagate plants a lot for sure. (Desert plants, on video for me obviously lol) Seeing small barrel cactus/ agave tucked under overhangs/ next to rocks or under some shade from a bigger shrub/ cactus whatever, natural microclimates. No one should be so ignorant to think that the plants they see were the only ones from the start…tons of seeds on most plants they just don’t all stick/ germinate/ survive. What amazes me still is the thought of almost any desert plant as a freshly germinated seedling heading into the coming summer with blazing unrelenting heat, and what in some cases out west in the states months with no rain? Crazy that any seedlings survive to me. What do you think it is just the plants sensing/ “knowing” the perfect time to spawn? Like when the cicada broods come out after 8 years lol. Nature, and all life is damn amazing!!! I don’t understand nearly enough about the mechanics of it all, but it’s cool to be a spectator of it for sure!!! 

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Inks Lake State Park revisited. Sunlight and a little more color than before in the “Devil’s Waterhole” area.file.php?id=80646file.php?id=80645file.php?id=80644file.php?id=80643file.php?id=80642file.php?id=80641file.php?id=80640file.php?id=80639file.php?id=80638file.php?id=80665file.php?id=80664file.php?id=80663file.php?id=80662file.php?id=80661file.php?id=80660file.php?id=80659file.php?id=80658file.php?id=80657file.php?id=80656file.php?id=80675file.php?id=80674

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On 4/8/2022 at 12:34 PM, teddytn said:

@Meangreen94z forget to ask you before, did you start the madrensis seedlings you’ve got from seed? 

They started well but I moved them out too quickly. Back in the garage under a light.

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Mine are standing at a south faced window on top of the heating system and grow fine. Stil not sure if I should plant one outside, maybe next spring. In totall I got 6 survivors out of 7 germinated seeds. Not a bad rate.

Eckhard

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  • 3 weeks later...

A few from a recent West Texas trip.

Yucca thompsoniana:

15F7E43C-4E61-4A1D-88D5-BBE0C67EB5B2.jpeg

Yucca Torreyi on the Rio Grande, Mexico to the left:

4334EFD7-67C6-4384-9A81-92EB460DF9DC.jpegYucca Faxoniana:

7F3FB243-ACD4-4D1F-BE77-EAE8CFD927FE.jpeg

F1A86172-140F-419E-9794-3DB670DD361E.jpeg15+ foot Yucca thompsoniana 

C077FB08-8FB3-4F53-90CD-51AD571BC018.jpeg

75C3BB5D-3BE8-408C-8AAE-B5A0203D6938.jpegDwarf form of thompsoniana near Langtry:

C23CB09C-E171-472B-BC7D-058472A96ECC.jpeg

CA9E6292-D0BD-4CD4-91E7-E3477E25A88F.jpeg30 foot Yucca filifera in Sanderson, Texas:

2951369B-66A0-4261-8054-57587553503F.jpegtorreyi:

12692461-9E2D-4CDE-9D15-BCF1A4E08659.jpegYucca thompsoniana East of Marathon, Texas:

E38EE25E-4666-4AC7-8D68-B7C89BC78B8D.jpegYucca Rigida Landscaping

09406B0F-F4D7-469C-9A85-86EE0124EE06.jpeg

533EF0ED-EDD5-4919-B2EA-A951D674265A.jpegAgave havardiana w/ evidence of Neomexicana mixed in:

5EBFD093-4F92-47BC-BD71-37600C218238.jpeg

F39B45CF-BF5D-4A93-B152-9E4E7D1C2FBD.jpeg

3FE9D07C-3197-4182-B325-14EE91000AD2.jpegOpuntia azurea:

262EDBA0-3B67-46F0-B417-7ED2084D4C36.jpegYucca rostrata in habitat , Black Gap WMA:

9451BEB6-E044-44A2-BD08-14E17B93415A.jpeg

7CACFB46-6A90-452A-A943-86FD858B54E1.jpeg

CCE5054C-C312-4A2B-9738-DE1B56FB7AE3.jpeg

C86D3D6F-8510-47C1-A136-5EAC9E67785E.jpeg

57F9AFEC-7792-4CE0-806C-2774ECD8D9B1.jpeg

99468686-F993-43B7-9A83-F565655636F4.jpeg

AC0253D9-C04E-42A1-840E-BA3BD5247557.jpegOpuntia spinosibacca:

DC9B53DF-F1D8-445A-96BC-076FB449004F.jpegHechtia texensis:

52A7B54D-0D17-474C-B049-58E68190A1E7.jpeg

3F7ECD74-DF2F-41B5-B98A-BB31AAFCF8A9.jpegEchinocereus dasyacanthus:

5BF555B2-034E-4B07-AB20-76C8F6F78D40.jpeg

16D3ABA2-F38E-4BCD-B135-757B4A4FAAEA.jpeg

4D9F1704-BCA0-47E1-9466-0288C551A795.jpeg

60EE78E0-15DF-47FB-B78C-6F94D438EF33.jpeg

E3CFBC72-9B4C-4927-8D79-899025C345D2.jpeg

C2CB3A1D-5ADD-4462-B7E7-E7087CC44247.jpeg

1CB724A7-6C38-4A95-BFAC-95E405298F7E.jpeg

12F45751-A4F0-4157-8D2A-A8C8EB80864E.jpeg

B27841D3-F269-4F80-9E50-9BDCC7F731F4.jpegOpuntia spinosibacca:

338A8A71-F0CD-4BC0-BB9F-7C240BD259E5.jpegEchinocereus stramineus :

DE355B72-0E5C-4A10-8CC5-AB78F32A821F.jpeg

515D4CDC-3444-4452-A831-16E51253CE0A.jpeg

03723DCB-A72D-44CC-8ECF-B09C2D2ED514.jpeg

D21E30E2-0EEE-437A-B309-E71A44238266.jpegOpuntia rufida:

A8E9A40E-A519-4DF8-A469-D9CAF6B026C3.jpeg

0007C5CA-24EA-4429-A8E1-56F72AA2A947.jpeg

F21A96FF-22F5-464D-AD88-EBC0805FEA1D.jpeg

8D514A1D-BCB0-4542-837F-EC81D10F069A.jpegRio Grande. La Linda, Mexico in view.

A70A34DE-3FAE-4A55-BE73-65015AD8E26B.jpeg

6B57E915-2545-4737-8611-B7C3BFE4BBE0.jpeg

93CA2ACF-0C04-4802-8DB6-B40DCB0FCD92.jpeg

31E30D62-CBC3-47F6-B948-84FDE56665B1.jpegHamatacactus hamatocanthus:

3F43AC4D-0B5A-46FD-ADE8-18B3A64219DD.jpeg

5DA3652C-7A7C-48A1-81F6-2A2A13AE5F26.jpeg

51B6B475-C624-4D45-8523-B9D9000D4262.jpeg

7DC56679-3C06-476C-9300-680D336B8BC8.jpeg

D6FD9A95-92A2-4EF7-BB6D-B28BABBC12A8.jpegGrusonia schottii:

AF0B195A-592E-4947-BD04-407196CD6521.jpegEchinocactus horizonthalonius:

E1160690-08C7-416B-BA1E-5906FD6A4F53.jpegYucca Rostrata up the mountain side:

6190A46A-A52F-45BF-BE96-43945C98D623.jpeg

F02B5AF2-4DFE-4D8B-BF90-0E36314CF22A.jpeg

A9F55F9D-8E52-45D4-8B5E-76675CBE5F18.jpeg

96E8E045-C79D-49AF-B3E8-D99F3FA5C546.jpegYucca faxoniana in Black Gap:

7234FE4A-F16B-4456-86FB-249E9BE53CD0.jpeg

BD172FB0-7C7A-4F34-B9AB-5B63D242611F.jpeg

A965FE6B-0E7A-43B6-BC6D-ECEC9215BD8E.jpeg

012361A1-E9E8-446C-A4A4-2106F84067CA.jpeg

00312C95-5F91-4890-82F3-4DE24E52B575.jpeg

FD21B70E-49E3-4675-8DDD-83AC9EF58A76.jpegCandelilla and Ariocarpus fissuratus:

3617BBA1-EA3E-48B0-8731-18530D70EC14.jpeg

46E549B4-EDF3-47A7-865E-1DFF2905555E.jpeg

CF4F1D25-299D-491F-AF6E-F805A04D6E34.jpeg

BBD1A8FA-4355-497E-AC08-C01608F5A941.jpeg

ED8219B1-EBAC-4D7B-BCEF-F29947630691.jpeg

8B35C0EC-3BC3-4EBF-8E05-8E1AE45569E0.jpeg

B1EFE41F-D77C-4992-BFEC-C0DEEDC0A054.jpegOpuntia azurea:

6DCA0EF7-EAB6-4D63-8B09-659B4D28866D.jpeg

783C6BA8-5125-4209-AF93-37A085CD9A27.jpeg 

D4738CE4-2317-41D4-B58A-6021FCDB4F33.jpeg

4F109CF9-2B1A-4A4E-B996-5F5034E173FD.jpeg

F0FAC137-B4B7-4178-879E-3264F963655F.jpeg

45A12771-E18D-401D-86AF-25E8985FF02A.jpeg

B8C19C2F-BB0A-460D-9342-9421AB12F235.jpeg

E15FC715-9F7A-4550-B73A-760D3EFF93D9.jpeg

72F8B1F0-DE7A-4DC0-8073-BF83779D2BA9.jpeg

660415E2-9161-4CA9-AA10-3BD22D1B9D38.jpeg

1A9AA874-8AE3-4B8B-AC78-DE5713B73250.jpeg

9720FA7E-0253-48D4-95D8-9B0B0414AF0E.jpeg

BCDFE275-6494-4143-9B12-82579DECBA46.jpeg

722B6CF6-20B4-4F8E-B503-75C8828CC8BE.jpeg

BAD4EFD8-AC27-4E9D-AA6D-551981BDD1B9.jpeg

FA7F522B-8436-4950-9E80-6D86F9648C7A.jpegYucca elata var. radiosa:

83D102DF-B5F2-481F-930A-40FF8DBD5AFF.jpeg

378FFB7D-B81A-46D5-A099-E60201DA9DE6.jpeg

647595C3-A3E9-4463-A942-88C2648EAE1A.jpeg

F0AF06F8-DFD1-443F-A714-218A80EF66A7.jpeg

87E093D5-7425-415B-A97E-69892055F19C.jpeg

EA8A862E-815A-4EE2-B192-C5A846756C20.jpegAgave havardiana north of Marathon:

571A9657-A220-4BDD-BF2A-A70E3BA17E66.jpeg

77300DC8-3CD0-41D3-941F-051EB3F37A50.jpeg

B405FAD8-EB8F-4D6E-9A04-2D3B36CE5652.jpeg

7DFF0471-13A9-45A8-B3E4-61D06A7307E7.jpeg

4C528CF4-BD6A-42D4-BF64-D5123AFEB1B6.jpeg

FAEAFCF0-3092-4A48-928B-E932EC6385C1.jpeg

D7D2A31C-3B4E-4A77-ACE6-6B7DFCE210F4.jpeg

F17320B9-F619-446E-B06E-2E45AC09A221.jpeg

F423183E-37DB-4883-BF4D-62D38F8CD321.jpeg

7DBA592B-4DFC-46D7-B144-54D3E50E4D5E.jpeg

DC17CF42-3A30-491A-AEB8-C525E36AD2B3.jpeg

40346100-F5BA-4531-8C99-04F9C92BD7F3.jpeg

3D485943-BFD1-4B4B-9927-7E9225CD6D52.jpegCylindropuntia imbricata:

DAF8F778-1C10-4031-B2AD-2DD7AE2248BE.jpeg

E8F9979D-D1E3-4C7A-AB9D-14DD90185D9A.jpeg

CB949B2E-EC32-4723-82DF-0254F0F9220A.jpeg

6803D60C-C3D6-4507-B962-DCBA4645DBCF.jpeg

CE6AA033-BCB9-4CE0-8C56-11F85B83F86B.jpegOpuntia strigil:

9A29DA44-7E0C-4AA7-9EB0-0AC85514AD3B.jpeg

DB1E524D-EBE2-4094-B1CF-77658082572C.jpeg

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Uploading pictures on here really drains the color compared to elsewhere.

Palmtalk:A70A34DE-3FAE-4A55-BE73-65015AD8E26B.thumb.jpeg.49e2ac7e6167287aa59635050447aa84.jpeg

Agaveville:file.php?id=81170I try to link the pictures for this reason but it’s very tedious on large uploads 

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@Meangreen94z Sir! First, if it’s not, it should be against the rules to put that much gold in one post!!!! 
Second, where’s the triple upvote? Holy smokes!!!! :greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

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These are amazing pictures like each time .  For sure a place to be visited. All these Yuccas drive me crazy.

Eckhard 

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7 hours ago, teddytn said:

@Meangreen94z Sir! First, if it’s not, it should be against the rules to put that much gold in one post!!!! 
Second, where’s the triple upvote? Holy smokes!!!! :greenthumb::greenthumb::greenthumb:

Thanks. I was surprised it let me upload that many pictures on one post, atleast without crashing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,

I'm wondering about these seedlings grown from seed which I picked in White Sands NP in 2019.

First picture shows the mother:

DSC_8395.thumb.jpg.2f1c4390ed6a31783787bad8da620335.jpg

Next picture shows some seedlings in a community pot:

20220509_192117.thumb.jpg.9caf178ba9739cd96e129b1947c235c7.jpg

Detail of leave:

20220509_192137.thumb.jpg.d91b15099633bf92c6249450a13a458c.jpg

I'm wondering if this is a hybrid. If yes, what coud be the father? A I always stored and labeled the seed pots with the picture no. right after collecting them I'm sure these are seedlings from this Yucca. These are the only seed of that day that look like this (that day I only collected Y. elata seeds at White Sands).

These are cold hardy to at least -12°C/~10°F as this was the temperature they had to survive this winter.

Any idea? Some kind of baccata inside?

Thanks

Eckhard

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I need a quick ID, is this Yucca treculeana? I am currently germinating some old seed and need an educated identification. Sorry I don't have better pictures, but this was located just east of Eagle Pass Texas.

IMGP1270.thumb.JPG.4889201156e0875951a9305259e47ac4.JPGIMGP1271.thumb.JPG.c9aff94335d2bd27f4fec6ac2c3ea1fd.JPG

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Looks a bit like torreyi in my eyes.

But good pictures.

Eckhard 

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13 minutes ago, Palmensammler said:

Looks a bit like torreyi in my eyes.

But good pictures.

Eckhard 

Thanks,

I know both Y. torreyi and Y. treculeana are native to that part of Texas and it was on undeveloped ranch land. Unfortunately the yucca identification part of my brain is not active, yet.

Here is a closer look at the fruit.

IMGP1275.thumb.JPG.10b0ee01d5c057f9e0892d62cc1d592c.JPG

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That would be Yucca treculeana. Yucca torreyi always grows uniform. Yucca treculeana can vary widely and get close to torreyi appearance, but the jumbled uneven growth is a giveaway. 

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On 5/12/2022 at 1:37 PM, Palmensammler said:

Hi all,

I'm wondering about these seedlings grown from seed which I picked in White Sands NP in 2019.

First picture shows the mother:

DSC_8395.thumb.jpg.2f1c4390ed6a31783787bad8da620335.jpg

Next picture shows some seedlings in a community pot:

20220509_192117.thumb.jpg.9caf178ba9739cd96e129b1947c235c7.jpg

Detail of leave:

20220509_192137.thumb.jpg.d91b15099633bf92c6249450a13a458c.jpg

I'm wondering if this is a hybrid. If yes, what coud be the father? A I always stored and labeled the seed pots with the picture no. right after collecting them I'm sure these are seedlings from this Yucca. These are the only seed of that day that look like this (that day I only collected Y. elata seeds at White Sands).

These are cold hardy to at least -12°C/~10°F as this was the temperature they had to survive this winter.

Any idea? Some kind of baccata inside?

Thanks

Eckhard

They appear to be a hybrid

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This is one of my favorite threads on PT:greenthumb:

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Matt in Temecula, CA

Hot and dry in the summer, cold with light frost in the winter. Halfway between the desert and ocean

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19 hours ago, Meangreen94z said:

It reminds me strongly of my Yucca baccata seedlings. I only remember seeing Yucca elata there but baccata is listed as well.

https://nhnm.unm.edu/sites/default/files/nonsensitive/publications/nhnm/U00MUL02NMUS.pdf

Was also my first thought  but can't remember any baccatas in this area.  How wide do yucca moths spread to pollinate the plants?

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16 hours ago, freakypalmguy said:

This is one of my favorite threads on PT:greenthumb:

Also mine .......

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Can I do anything to get seeds off my Yucca Rostrata? Or I need a moth? There is someone up there….

CCD7DB8B-06BA-45C1-9FED-6870B2635351.jpeg

72A37543-D3B3-4EA8-83F8-3F08098633C2.jpeg

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Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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On 5/17/2022 at 11:55 AM, Meangreen94z said:

That would be Yucca treculeana. Yucca torreyi always grows uniform. Yucca treculeana can vary widely and get close to torreyi appearance, but the jumbled uneven growth is a giveaway. 

What are you using for your camera by the way if you don’t mind? 

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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31 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

Can I do anything to get seeds off my Yucca Rostrata? Or I need a moth? There is someone up there….

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Probably have to hand pollinate. Wish I could find a good how to link, but I don't seem to be successful. Basically, you take a pollen ball and insert into the stigma. A wooden shish kabob skewer might work.

Also works for hybridization, just sayin'.

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37 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

What are you using for your camera by the way if you don’t mind? 

Who were you asking?

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3 minutes ago, amh said:

Who were you asking?

Daniel

Current Texas Gardening Zone 9a, Mean (1999-2024): 22F Low/104F High. Yearly Precipitation 39.17 inches.

Extremes: Low Min 4F 2021, 13.8F 2024. High Max 112F 2011/2023, Precipitation Max 58 inches 2015, Lowest 19 Inches 2011.

Weather Station: https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KTXCOLLE465

Ryan (Paleoclimatologist Since 4 billion Years ago, Meteorologist/Earth Scientist/Physicist Since 1995, Savy Horticulturist Since Birth.)

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Got this huge Yucca rostrata from The Cactus Outlet (Etsy) today. It had tons of active roots and wasn't one of those borderline scam imported Yuccas that have a 50/50 shot of making it. It was pricey, but for being an established large plant, I think worth it. 

 

Can't wait to plant it at the new place next month. 

 

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17 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

What are you using for your camera by the way if you don’t mind? 

Most of the recent pictures were just using an iPhone 13 Pro Max

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Some flowers stalks start to emerge. Sorry light wasn't that good anymore.

Y. Marcel (flaccida Bright Edge x thompsoniana) flowers the first time

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Flower of Y. Marcel

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Y. "Jersey" (I collected the rhizome during a visit on the isle of Jersey a few years ago) flowers the second time. Has a nice varigation

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Typical "Garden Yucca" , no one nows its right name

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Y. "Garland Gold" flowers the first time

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Hope that more are in position as I want to try to cross again.

What is flowering for you?

Eckhard

Edited by Palmensammler
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  • 1 month later...

Pandale, Texas . Yucca torreyi, dwarf form of Yucca thompsoniana(likely thompsoniana x reverchonii), Dasylirion texanum, and others file.php?id=82837file.php?id=82838file.php?id=82839file.php?id=82840file.php?id=82841file.php?id=82842file.php?id=82843file.php?id=82845file.php?id=82846file.php?id=82847file.php?id=82848file.php?id=82849file.php?id=82851file.php?id=82852file.php?id=82853file.php?id=82854file.php?id=82855file.php?id=82856file.php?id=82850file.php?id=82857file.php?id=82858file.php?id=82859file.php?id=82860file.php?id=82861file.php?id=82862file.php?id=82863file.php?id=82864file.php?id=82865file.php?id=82866file.php?id=82867file.php?id=82868file.php?id=82869file.php?id=82870file.php?id=82871file.php?id=82872file.php?id=82874file.php?id=82875file.php?id=82876file.php?id=82877

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Amistad Reservoir at dawn. Yucca torreyi, Yucca thompsoniana, Agave lechuguilla, Hamatacactus hamatocanthus, Opuntia atrispina, Echinocereus stramineus, Echinocereus triglochidiatus, etc.file.php?id=82879file.php?id=82880file.php?id=82882file.php?id=82883file.php?id=82884file.php?id=82885file.php?id=82886file.php?id=82887file.php?id=82888file.php?id=82889file.php?id=82892file.php?id=82893file.php?id=82894file.php?id=82895file.php?id=82881file.php?id=82896file.php?id=82897

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