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Bridgeport Sabal Palmetto CT Notable Trees


Mr.SamuraiSword

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DECEMBER 2021 UPDATE

 

wrapping the sabal palmetto we call BABSHI, one of Connecticut's notable tress, which has been living outside unheated since 2009 in a warm microclimate in Bridgeport CT.

 

We believe it is one of the few if not only Sabal palmetto  palms who has survived this far north  growing outside and never brought in  for this long.

 

Bridgeport is official zone 7a but with the many microclimate protective factors, IM SURE ITS A ZONE 8 MICROCLIMATE

 Microclimate factors are the following

1. dark brick building absorbing winter heat and blocking cold northern winter winds

2.location near Long island sound ON 3 SIDES

3.planted chose to building in a frost free zone 1.5 feet from building

4.potential heat escape from building?

5.Mummy wrapping and antifungal spray on crown

6.mounding of soil and much as high up as we can over the sensitive areas of the palm spear

im sure these have kept the palm alive and getting big!

Dr Anthony P poses near Babshi our sabal palmetto dec 2021 winter wrapped bridgeport CT.jpg

DrZ wraps sabal palmetto Brideport Ct dec 2021.jpg

Drz wrapping intently Dec 2021.PNG

DrZ wrapping the Sabal palm dec 2021.PNG

DrZ wraps sabal palmetto Brideport Ct dec 2021.jpg

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Yes exactly,

 

we were only protecting it lightly for years BEFORE 2018 with all of the warmer winters we had

 

but in 2018, winter was so bad and wet and long (into march) that we thought the palm was actually dead, the spear pulled.

 

But it somehow rallied and we vowed to protect it since then with maximum protection as it is an iconic palm living so far up North.

 

In 2018 it was inducted into the CT Notable tree database

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11 hours ago, DrZnaturally said:

Yes exactly,

 

we were only protecting it lightly for years BEFORE 2018 with all of the warmer winters we had

 

but in 2018, winter was so bad and wet and long (into march) that we thought the palm was actually dead, the spear pulled.

 

But it somehow rallied and we vowed to protect it since then with maximum protection as it is an iconic palm living so far up North.

 

In 2018 it was inducted into the CT Notable tree database

Do you protect any of the other palms planted nearby?  I remember seeing another smaller sabal palmetto, and young minor, trachycarpus and a needle sometime back.  Also I remember an odd trunking yucca, do you know what species?  Can't wait to see it again next spring/summer!

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23 hours ago, DrZnaturally said:

DECEMBER 2021 UPDATE

 

wrapping the sabal palmetto we call BABSHI, one of Connecticut's notable tress, which has been living outside unheated since 2009 in a warm microclimate in Bridgeport CT.

 

We believe it is one of the few if not only Sabal palmetto  palms who has survived this far north  growing outside and never brought in  for this long.

 

Bridgeport is official zone 7a but with the many microclimate protective factors, IM SURE ITS A ZONE 8 MICROCLIMATE

 Microclimate factors are the following

1. dark brick building absorbing winter heat and blocking cold northern winter winds

2.location near Long island sound ON 3 SIDES

3.planted chose to building in a frost free zone 1.5 feet from building

4.potential heat escape from building?

5.Mummy wrapping and antifungal spray on crown

6.mounding of soil and much as high up as we can over the sensitive areas of the palm spear

im sure these have kept the palm alive and getting big!

Dr Anthony P poses near Babshi our sabal palmetto dec 2021 winter wrapped bridgeport CT.jpg

DrZ wraps sabal palmetto Brideport Ct dec 2021.jpg

Drz wrapping intently Dec 2021.PNG

DrZ wrapping the Sabal palm dec 2021.PNG

DrZ wraps sabal palmetto Brideport Ct dec 2021.jpg

God forbid you ever lose it, replant with Sabal birmingham instead of palmetto.

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13 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Do you protect any of the other palms planted nearby?  I remember seeing another smaller sabal palmetto, and young minor, trachycarpus and a needle sometime back.  Also I remember an odd trunking yucca, do you know what species?  Can't wait to see it again next spring/summer!

Unfortunately all of those specimens had to be dug up as he university has to tar and seal the foundation of the building, which has cracks in it because of superstorm sandy getting salt water into the foundation

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On 1/1/2022 at 4:21 PM, DrZnaturally said:

Unfortunately all of those specimens had to be dug up as he university has to tar and seal the foundation of the building, which has cracks in it because of superstorm sandy getting salt water into the foundation

Oh damn. Were they able to be repotted/replanted?

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many were adopted by my botanical medicine students for their own gardens

One of the sabals died in transplantation (sabal minor)

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  • 7 months later...
On 12/31/2021 at 2:36 PM, Aceraceae said:

Was it left uncovered for a few winters around 2016 and 17 etc and that's what led to the damage/dieback in 2018? 

 

On 12/31/2021 at 3:16 PM, DrZnaturally said:

Yes exactly,

 

we were only protecting it lightly for years BEFORE 2018 with all of the warmer winters we had

 

but in 2018, winter was so bad and wet and long (into march) that we thought the palm was actually dead, the spear pulled.

 

But it somehow rallied and we vowed to protect it since then with maximum protection as it is an iconic palm living so far up North.

 

In 2018 it was inducted into the CT Notable tree database

But not all the winters prior to 2018 back to '09 were mild. 2014 and 2015 were cold and in 2015 February was a record cold month in a lot of the Northeast down to the mid Atlantic, almost causing Long Island sound to freeze over completely for the first time in 50 years. 

https://riverheadnewsreview.timesreview.com/2015/02/62620/with-icy-air-comes-a-frozen-long-island-sound/2/

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13 hours ago, Aceraceae said:

 

But not all the winters prior to 2018 back to '09 were mild. 2014 and 2015 were cold and in 2015 February was a record cold month in a lot of the Northeast down to the mid Atlantic, almost causing Long Island sound to freeze over completely for the first time in 50 years. 

https://riverheadnewsreview.timesreview.com/2015/02/62620/with-icy-air-comes-a-frozen-long-island-sound/2/

I remember that year...it was not protected back then...I thought it was dead because I would pass by it on the bus and see the palm fronds covered in snow, but later I couldn't see anything. Then I went to it and saw the stump with some green in it and was very surprised it had survived and then it just grew back. I think having snow cover for much of that month helped insulate it.

Edited by Xion4360
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3 minutes ago, SeanK said:

I wonder if there is space on the south side of a brick bldg in Southampton, LI/NY ?

Most of long island east of New York City is a bit more oceanic and cooler in the summer than Southern New England and the Mid-Atlantic. Windmill palms can grow on Long Island and Nantucket with a little bit of protection and no winter heat. 

New York City had or has needle palms including a big one at the Brooklyn botanical center not sure about the main one, NYCBG Bronx. It may have been torn out. 

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  • 1 month later...

I have 2 Sabal's 1 14ft and 1 12 ft growing on long Island and just with the June through September heat they have grown very well. I'm on the North Shore of Suffolk County on Long Island. I've also has a Chinese fan palm in ground for almost 5 years, 1 Washy, and 2 Trachy's, 1 9ft and the other about 3ft. We really don't see a killing temp for the Sabal outside of Mid Jan-March. But I box my Sabal's early November to be safe since it's not really worth it to wait since they won't grow anyway. So I only have about 13 miles South on you but I use some heat

palmy.jpeg

palmy 2.jpeg

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15 minutes ago, Holloway727 said:

I have 2 Sabal's 1 14ft and 1 12 ft growing on long Island and just with the June through September heat they have grown very well. I'm on the North Shore of Suffolk County on Long Island. I've also has a Chinese fan palm in ground for almost 5 years, 1 Washy, and 2 Trachy's, 1 9ft and the other about 3ft. We really don't see a killing temp for the Sabal outside of Mid Jan-March. But I box my Sabal's early November to be safe since it's not really worth it to wait since they won't grow anyway. So I only have about 13 miles South on you but I use some heat

palmy.jpeg

palmy 2.jpeg

Nice looking palms! When did you plant the Sabals and do you have pics of last winter's protection?

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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33 minutes ago, Allen said:

Nice looking palms! When did you plant the Sabals and do you have pics of last winter's protection?

This will only be the 2nd winter for the Sabal’s but they came through flawless, both were Florida grown, hurricane cut, and regenerated from North Carolina. I box them and both are heated using C9 lights but with the Polycarbonate south wall I honestly doubt they would even need heat but I’m not a gambling man with them haha, I boxed them early last year since they were just transplanted and I didn’t want to stress them anymore than they were.  

5276566C-399F-4E36-AF47-1C896E1DF058.jpeg

40DE18D6-2F78-4BBB-A87C-8D273DB41234.jpeg

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31 minutes ago, Holloway727 said:

This will only be the 2nd winter for the Sabal’s but they came through flawless, both were Florida grown, hurricane cut, and regenerated from North Carolina. I box them and both are heated using C9 lights but with the Polycarbonate south wall I honestly doubt they would even need heat but I’m not a gambling man with them haha, I boxed them early last year since they were just transplanted and I didn’t want to stress them anymore than they were.  

5276566C-399F-4E36-AF47-1C896E1DF058.jpeg

40DE18D6-2F78-4BBB-A87C-8D273DB41234.jpeg

Looks like you fixed it where they could breathe a bit with the clear panels.  Good job.

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YouTube https://www.youtube.com/@tntropics - 60+ In-ground 7A palms - (Sabal) minor(7 large + 27 seedling size, 3 dwarf),  brazoria(1) , birmingham(4), etonia (1) louisiana(5), palmetto (1), riverside (1),  (Trachycarpus) fortunei(7), wagnerianus(1),  Rhapidophyllum hystrix(7),  15' Mule-Butia x Syagrus(1),  Blue Butia capitata(1) +Tons of tropical plants.  Recent Yearly Lows -1F, 12F, 11F, 18F, 16F, 3F, 3F, 6F, 3F, 1F, 16F, 17F, 6F, 8F

 

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I thought Dr. Z might find this interesting (and others in the coastal Tri-State area NY/NJ/CT):

I also have a sabal palmetto growing along on Long Island Sound on the Connecticut coast near South Lyme.   My house is about 3/4 mile from the ocean on the flat coastal plain.  My palmetto is also along a south facing wall (blocking the north winds). It has been growing for 4 years. I protect with a mummy wrap of frost cloth and landscape fabric. It started as two small fronds about 2 feet tall, and now after 3 seasons is about 5 feet tall.  The front of the house appears to be a zone 7b based on low temps over the past 5 years. 

 

pic444.jpg

Edited by Subtropical LIS
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  • 2 months later...
  • 11 months later...
On 6/19/2020 at 12:55 PM, Palmlover4life said:

I am going to try 2 large sabals in my yard in Stratford this year. Obviously with winter protection.  I got them from ctpalmtrees.com and they said they can help us protect them. We shall see! 

Did you end up planting these? Pictures and update?

Zone 6b maritime climate

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That’s cool! I believe I saw either a video or article maybe on this forum about large windmills in either Fairfield, Greenwich, Norwalk, or Bridgeport. I’ll see if I can find it.

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  • 3 months later...

Yes thanks for posting photos!

this is DrZ, another successful season with the Sabal palmetto 'Bridgeport' in Bridgeport CT, Just unwrapped it

No real damage with El Nino this season, just a simple mummy wrap for protection

take care,

DrZ

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Another CT palm guy here, looking to share what I have been growing for some time in Norwalk. I have had this Trachycarpus in the ground in a very nice microclimate for roughly 6 years- I cover it from Christmas to early March every year with a zip-up frost cloth and use Christmas lights on the coldest nights. The Needles are always left unprotected-they do great! I have a few small sabal minors recently transplanted from Delaware that I hope will take off in the summer heat. Updates to follow!IMG_0228.thumb.jpeg.fa76830049d643d006c5b9ce56b417da.jpeg

IMG_0230.jpeg

IMG_0229.jpeg

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nice shots!! so glad to see the palms doing well

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where do you get the zip up frost cloth for the trachy??

RSVP

DrZ

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I got it several years ago from the guys at Island Wide Palm Company in Medford out on the island. They could probably get one made for you if you provide the specs. It works really well, and though my palm is getting a bit large to "easily" cover it really does work well.

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Ive heard of them and am from Setauket, close by, but i never visited them. I will check them out. maybe they do mail order.internet

i will check them out because i have a trachy in Woodbury CT where i live (attached dec 2023 photo) and i have grown it from seed since 2005 and its  huge now, so i need to find another way to protect it

be well,

 

DrZ

Trachycarpus naitital Woodbury CT.jpg

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3 hours ago, WRH said:

Another CT palm guy here, looking to share what I have been growing for some time in Norwalk. I have had this Trachycarpus in the ground in a very nice microclimate for roughly 6 years- I cover it from Christmas to early March every year with a zip-up frost cloth and use Christmas lights on the coldest nights. The Needles are always left unprotected-they do great! I have a few small sabal minors recently transplanted from Delaware that I hope will take off in the summer heat. Updates to follow!IMG_0228.thumb.jpeg.fa76830049d643d006c5b9ce56b417da.jpeg

IMG_0230.jpeg

IMG_0229.jpeg

What zone are you in? What is a typical winter like? Any tips on the needles?

Zone 6b maritime climate

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bridgeport CT is a 7A USDA zone, and i think Norwalk is too

The microclimate that we have found for the Sabal  is definitely a 7B/8A, as the ground close the building dosen't freeze at all in the winter; we use landscape cloth and well vented 6 mil plastic to wrap it every winter

Babchi 2023 December wrapped sabal palmetto Bridgeport.jpg

Sabal palmetto Bridgeport 2023 unwrapped.JPG

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15 hours ago, Leelanau Palms said:

What zone are you in? What is a typical winter like? Any tips on the needles?

I am in zone 7a, though due to the microclimate I would not be suprised if it were a bit more like 7b or 8a. The palms are at my parents house, which is very near the Five Mile River (undubtedly providing a little warmth), and have good winter sun exposure along the southern side of the house. I don't, unfortunately, have an absolute low temperature these palms have seen over the years, though they see low single digits a few nights every year. The truth is the CT coast is a lot more mild than most would think, thanks to the Sound  and the myriad of little peninsulas and coves that surely give rise to neat microclimates. Boring garden habits are probably why we don't see more experimentation there. I would say for the needles try to choose the location that gets the best winter sun and out of the wind, and always take heavy snow/ice off if you can!

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The usda in 2023 updated the agricultural zones

 

image.thumb.png.4292a6756cb362ef1f8a632108f10730.png

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