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Yard/Landscaping Progress


DAVEinMB

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Thanks, NC. My understanding is that robustas don't fare well in humidity.

Edited by Manalto
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39 minutes ago, Manalto said:

Thanks, NC. My understanding is that robustas don't fare well in humidity.

It depends, I've seen quite a few robusta growing in the myrtle beach and southeastern NC coastal area (which is quite humid like Mobile) and they do fine. They are only marginally hardy here however, and cold spells sometimes can kill off the weaker ones. The filibusta hybrid is definitely even better suited for the Southeastern climate, more humidity tolerant and slightly more cold hardy. The third variety, filifera, does not do well with humidity at all from my understanding.

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@Manalto @NC_Palm_Enthusiast it is a pure robusta. I would have rather gotten a filibusta but they are more difficult to find.  Robusta don't mind humidity but they do get angry below 20 degrees. Filibusta is nice because you get a couple degrees of additional cold tolerance from the filifera with the wet tolerance of the robusta. 

Also @Manalto thanks for the compliments! It's been a lot of work but man has it been fun. 

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Dave you need to throw a few citrus in the mix. A Changshu kumquat or a citrumello should do great in your area.

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43 minutes ago, Laaz said:

Dave you need to throw a few citrus in the mix. A Changshu kumquat or a citrumello should do great in your area.

Do they go deciduous in the winter?

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@NC_Palm_Enthusiast here are some more pics of the yuccas and spike plants. You can see the bit of overhead protection the house provides the yucca cane. It gets a good bit of wind protection where it's at as well. A couple of months ago it started new growth at the base of the trunk, I'm excited to see what it'll look like in a couple years if it survives. 

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I'm also giving strelitzia nicolai a try up against the house. It's in a nice little cove that can easily be enclosed if need be. 

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Wow those look awesome, thanks for the pics. Did you mention earlier that you also have fatsia growing? I wonder if that would make it up here

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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2 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

Wow those look awesome, thanks for the pics. Did you mention earlier that you also have fatsia growing? I wonder if that would make it up here

Thanks man, yea I have one fatsia planted. It's gotten huge since last year. I happen to be tooling around in the garden now, I'll post a few pics. 

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Here are the pics.  The fatsia are planted in a clumping with California elephant ears, some chamaedorea microspadix as well as radicalis and a spike plant. All of this is at the base of a tall sabal palmetto and a mule palm. 

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1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

Do they go deciduous in the winter?

No, but don't fertilize them after Aug 1st & they go semi dormant.

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If you can grow Fatsia you should be able to grow some Schefflera species like taiwaniana and delavayi, they seem to be a little hardier than Fatsia.

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2 hours ago, Chester B said:

If you can grow Fatsia you should be able to grow some Schefflera species like taiwaniana and delavayi, they seem to be a little hardier than Fatsia.

Did some research and apparently fatsia japonica, which is the common variety, is hardy to 7b? My local nursery sells them so I can't wait to try them out here

 

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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3 hours ago, Chester B said:

If you can grow Fatsia you should be able to grow some Schefflera species like taiwaniana and delavayi, they seem to be a little hardier than Fatsia.

Just looked up schefflera taiwaniana and man oh man is that a gorgeous plant, thanks for the recommendation. Now I just need to track one down

 

21 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

Did some research and apparently fatsia japonica, which is the common variety, is hardy to 7b? My local nursery sells them so I can't wait to try them out here

 

Japonica is the species I'm growing.  Been solid for me so far however I chose too sunny a planting spot for it so im constantly trying to provide it shade. In direct sun they almost halt growth completely. 

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1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

Just looked up schefflera taiwaniana and man oh man is that a gorgeous plant, thanks for the recommendation. Now I just need to track one down

 

Japonica is the species I'm growing.  Been solid for me so far however I chose too sunny a planting spot for it so im constantly trying to provide it shade. In direct sun they almost halt growth completely. 

I’ll keep that in mind, shade is a necessity. That schefflera is a gorgeous plant, apparently it’s hardy to 8a so I’ll give it a try too, that is if I can find any. I’ll probably have to order one online or something

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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On 5/25/2020 at 3:09 PM, DAVEinMB said:

Do they go deciduous in the winter?

My kumquat planted close to the house has been through 2 winters and hasn't lost leaves, and even holds fruit all winter! This year I bought 2 Arctic Frost satsumas.

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20 hours ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

I’ll keep that in mind, shade is a necessity. That schefflera is a gorgeous plant, apparently it’s hardy to 8a so I’ll give it a try too, that is if I can find any. I’ll probably have to order one online or something

My small  S. delavayi came through with no issues, although it was a mild winter.

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2 minutes ago, Buggle said:

My small  S. delavayi came through with no issues, although it was a mild winter.

Is that variety any more hardy than taiwaniana? What part of NC are you in? I'm up around Greensboro

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36 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

Is that variety any more hardy than taiwaniana? What part of NC are you in? I'm up around Greensboro

The Wilmington area, so a solid z8, but it's from Plant Delights and listed as 7b. Presumably more hardy.

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42 minutes ago, Buggle said:

 

The Wilmington area, so a solid z8, but it's from Plant Delights and listed as 7b. Presumably more hardy.

Oh nice, greensboro is technically 7b but the last twenty years have been solid 8a. I heard Wilmington is showing warming trends as well, might be zone 9 in a decade or so right?

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I can give you two other pretty hardy Broad Leaf Evergreens that I grow that I think have a tropical look, maybe not as much as the Schefflera but still decent.

Metapanax delayavi - These grow pretty quick.

Metapanax/Nothopanax davidii

These might be difficult to find.

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1 hour ago, Chester B said:

I can give you two other pretty hardy Broad Leaf Evergreens that I grow that I think have a tropical look, maybe not as much as the Schefflera but still decent.

Metapanax delayavi - These grow pretty quick.

Metapanax/Nothopanax davidii

These might be difficult to find.

Thanks, I had never heard of those. What exactly is the difference between the metapanax and nothopanax? (you'll have to excuse me I'm not real familiar with scientific/latin plant names)

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It goes by both names. I think it falls under Metapanax now. Plants and animals get reassigned to a new genus as more information becomes available. 
 

not the best pic but here is the M delayavi in the middle. They put out a flush of new growth in the spring. This plant is about 7’ tall and almost as big around. New growth is very light green and will eventually darken. The also flower later in the summer. 

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7 hours ago, Chester B said:

It goes by both names. I think it falls under Metapanax now. Plants and animals get reassigned to a new genus as more information becomes available. 
 

not the best pic but here is the M delayavi in the middle. They put out a flush of new growth in the spring. This plant is about 7’ tall and almost as big around. New growth is very light green and will eventually darken. The also flower later in the summer. 

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Thanks for these suggestions! On Sunday I'm gonna take a trip to a large local nursery to see if they can get them, fingers crossed 

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16 hours ago, Chester B said:

It goes by both names. I think it falls under Metapanax now. Plants and animals get reassigned to a new genus as more information becomes available. 
 

not the best pic but here is the M delayavi in the middle. They put out a flush of new growth in the spring. This plant is about 7’ tall and almost as big around. New growth is very light green and will eventually darken. The also flower later in the summer. 

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Ah ok, thanks. That's a beautiful plant, definitely has a tropical look to it. Hopefully I can find some to buy

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Hard to get a good pic of it for some reason. 

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On 5/25/2020 at 4:38 PM, Laaz said:

No, but don't fertilize them after Aug 1st & they go semi dormant.

Good deal, I got a lot of real estate and a growing list of plants to replace grass :D

 

On 5/26/2020 at 6:55 PM, Buggle said:

My kumquat planted close to the house has been through 2 winters and hasn't lost leaves, and even holds fruit all winter! This year I bought 2 Arctic Frost satsumas.

Holy smokes, that's awesome. Your climate is very similar to mine so that's good to know. What side of the house is it planted on?

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2 hours ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

Looking good Dave !!! Was it sold as Var Strictor ? 

Thanks TJ! I'm working on grass removal....1 palm at a time :D

It was not labeled as a strictor and was actually planted in the ground at the nursery and had been growing there for some time; luckily they agreed to sell it :shaka-2:

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@DAVEinMB Wow how much for that bad boy ? Your definitely into the instant gratification style for sure =) 

I prefer the var strictor look myslef wish they would make Mules with them !!! 

T J 

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On 5/27/2020 at 10:04 PM, DAVEinMB said:

Good deal, I got a lot of real estate and a growing list of plants to replace grass :D

 

Holy smokes, that's awesome. Your climate is very similar to mine so that's good to know. What side of the house is it planted on?

Hmm, I'm not sure. How can you tell?

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2 hours ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

@DAVEinMB Wow how much for that bad boy ? Your definitely into the instant gratification style for sure =) 

I prefer the var strictor look myslef wish they would make Mules with them !!! 

It was a birthday gift from the fam so I'm not sure exactly how much it was. The nursery it came from charges 150/ft of trunk for pindos so im guessing right around 500. 

I've only recently learned of the strictor var and it's def a looker. Im trying to piece together a landscape of things you don't commonly see around so strictor fit the bill B)

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1 hour ago, Buggle said:

Hmm, I'm not sure. How can you tell?

I used the Google map app on my phone to determine my house's orientation. It's got a built in compass when you're in the plan view

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What a difference a year can make...

Top photo is April shortly after the sylvestris was planted, bottom photo is this month. Not quite the same angle but you get the idea 

More to come :shaka-2:

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Some miscellaneous additions / updates. 

This past week I added a small umbrella palm and foxtail fern in a protected spot by the patio. They should enjoy the radiational heat from all the stone and concrete around them. 

Also, I planted a canna lily next to a clump of giant timber bamboo back in April. It was maybe 2' tall when it went in the ground; it's now over 5 foot and has shot out a number of new stalks. The purple foliage and bright red flowers really add some nice contrast amidst the bamboo. 

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Dave, I love what you've done with the place. Seriously, it looks great. I'm a foxtail fern fan. They're so lush and distinctive, and command attention at ground level, which is important when you want your landscape to be interesting everywhere you look.

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@Manalto thanks James! I guess we'll see with time how everything holds up haha. I'm in love with that foxtail fern, it reminds me of a bunch of tiny arborvitaes. My girlfriend and I both stared at 

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