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Yard/Landscaping Progress


DAVEinMB

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26 minutes ago, RJ said:

How did your bamboo fair? I want to try the same variety here.

 

there is a decent clump of Chinensis growing in chapin that looks about like yours. Interesting to see how it fairs. 

The bambusa oldhamii looks like it's going to lose all its canes. It got zapped to the ground after last winter and got to around 12' tall this growing season. Didn't know I was buying such an expensive perennial but it is what it is. 

Bambusa multiplex all look fine. I have 4 clumps in total and they don't seem to be fazed. 

The foliage on my l. Chinensis is really beat up but the newest 8 to 10 petioles are bright green and are showing no signs of collapse. Gonna look like hell for awhile but I think it'll be fine

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1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

The bambusa oldhamii looks like it's going to lose all its canes. It got zapped to the ground after last winter and got to around 12' tall this growing season. Didn't know I was buying such an expensive perennial but it is what it is. 

Bambusa multiplex all look fine. I have 4 clumps in total and they don't seem to be fazed. 

The foliage on my l. Chinensis is really beat up but the newest 8 to 10 petioles are bright green and are showing no signs of collapse. Gonna look like hell for awhile but I think it'll be fine

Multiplex was Alphonse Karr wasn’t it? 

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8 minutes ago, RJ said:

Multiplex was Alphonse Karr wasn’t it? 

Yea, it's a good looking bamboo. Canes are yellow with light (almost lime) green stripes

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1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

Yea, it's a good looking bamboo. Canes are yellow with light (almost lime) green stripes

Yeah they have it growing at the zoo here in Columbia, that’s where I first saw it. It was a good 15-20 feet tall. 

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Fingers crossed this cordyline australis pushes new growth, it was getting pretty tall. There are a number around town that look fine but mine haven't fared so well. I'm assuming it's due to shaded siting, maybe? I dunno

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On 1/20/2023 at 7:59 AM, DAVEinMB said:

The bambusa oldhamii looks like it's going to lose all its canes. 

I know I'm in a different climate, but in my search for hardy bamboos, I researched this species and decided it was not a good candidate for zone-pushing.  Can't remember why.  I feel you on the expense part.  The only cheap bamboo you can get in the PNW is the occasional 1-gal Fargesia rufa in the big box stores, which will take the better part of a decade to get to full-size.  I prefer to buy "field-dug", mature root balls from a local grower I know.  They're not cheap, however. 

Edited by Jesse PNW
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4 hours ago, Jesse PNW said:

I know I'm in a different climate, but in my search for hardy bamboos, I researched this species and decided it was not a good candidate for zone-pushing.  Can't remember why.  I feel you on the expense part.  The only cheap bamboo you can get in the PNW is the occasional 1-gal Fargesia rufa in the big box stores, which will take the better part of a decade to get to full-size.  I prefer to buy "field-dug", mature root balls from a local grower I know.  They're not cheap, however. 

If I recall there are many more clumping bamboo options for folks in the PNW in the zone 8 region. I seem to recall lots of the species not liking the SE humidity. We have all  kinds of options for runners..… but 🤕

Edited by RJ
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6 hours ago, Jesse PNW said:

I know I'm in a different climate, but in my search for hardy bamboos, I researched this species and decided it was not a good candidate for zone-pushing.  Can't remember why.  I feel you on the expense part.  The only cheap bamboo you can get in the PNW is the occasional 1-gal Fargesia rufa in the big box stores, which will take the better part of a decade to get to full-size.  I prefer to buy "field-dug", mature root balls from a local grower I know.  They're not cheap, however. 

Yea i saw the oldhamii for sale at a local nursery and just assumed it was hardy here if they were selling it. Well, we see how that worked out haha. It seems to get mad in the mid 20s with cane loss happening below 20. With any luck we'll string together some mild winters and maybe it'll put on some size. If not, it is what it is and I'll enjoy it as an interesting perennial. Either way it's adding diversity to the garden

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20 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

Fingers crossed this cordyline australis pushes new growth, it was getting pretty tall. There are a number around town that look fine but mine haven't fared so well. I'm assuming it's due to shaded siting, maybe? I dunno

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I'm sure it will be fine, but it may decide to regrow from the ground.  Until you started posting yours I never associated the SE with Cordylines, I believe they like our weather on the west coast better and tend to be a staple Tree the closer you get to the coast.  Here's some medium sized ones, but a whole lot planted in one spot.

Also there is a decent bamboo nursery here, that has a lot of good info on their website if you are looking for some other bamboo.

https://www.bamboogarden.com/

 

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Edited by Chester B
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6 hours ago, Chester B said:

I'm sure it will be fine, but it may decide to regrow from the ground.  Until you started posting yours I never associated the SE with Cordylines, I believe they like our weather on the west coast better and tend to be a staple Tree the closer you get to the coast.  Here's some medium sized ones, but a whole lot planted in one spot.

Also there is a decent bamboo nursery here, that has a lot of good info on their website if you are looking for some other bamboo.

https://www.bamboogarden.com/

 

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Cordyline fruticosa would probably like the south east conditions, but they are less hardy so probably only one for Florida and far southern costal Texas.

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yucca gloriosa continuing to gain size and is mean as ever. 

I'll have to try to find a picture of it before it was planted. Iirc it was less than 2' tall when I sited it and it's around 6' now. Also doing my best to keep the pups at bay. 

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1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

yucca gloriosa continuing to gain size and is mean as ever. 

I'll have to try to find a picture of it before it was planted. Iirc it was less than 2' tall when I sited it and it's around 6' now. Also doing my best to keep the pups at bay. 

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Has it not flowered???

Mine are multi headed beasts, plus they sucker profusely from the base.  I've removed some altogether and the others are on borrowed time.  Mine are the variegated form, so they look crappy after winter do to all the spotting.

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27 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Has it not flowered???

Mine are multi headed beasts, plus they sucker profusely from the base.  I've removed some altogether and the others are on borrowed time.  Mine are the variegated form, so they look crappy after winter do to all the spotting.

It has not, haha. Been in the ground something like 4 years. I have 3 planted around the base of the sabal and all 3 have constantly tried to sucker but no flowers yet. I just pull the pups when I see them start to emerge. My hope is that they will eventually be tall enough that the danger zone is above my head. As I'm sure you are aware, they are not fun to walk into

I have one variegated form that looks surprisingly good right now. I'll try to get a pic later on today

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Stoked to see both my small grapefruit trees survived the arctic blast unprotected and are already pushing new growth

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A couple comments:

The variegated Yucca looks more like Y. aloifolia to me.  More slender trunk and leaves

The new growth on the grapefruit is below the graft so its probably Poncirus exhibiting new growth.  You'll want to trim that off.  You'll be able to tell if its poncirus as it will have the Trilobe leaves.

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40 minutes ago, Chester B said:

A couple comments:

The variegated Yucca looks more like Y. aloifolia to me.  More slender trunk and leaves

The new growth on the grapefruit is below the graft so its probably Poncirus exhibiting new growth.  You'll want to trim that off.  You'll be able to tell if its poncirus as it will have the Trilobe leaves.

Oh nice, yea it was a freebie so I just assumed it was gloriosa. 

Both those grapefruit were seed grown from fruit off @Laaz tree in Charleston, no grafts here 😁

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Ah looked like a graft in the one photo, my mistake.  Grow on!

Heres how the gloriosa end up after a few years. Pretty gnarly looking with multiple heads and a very thick trunk. I liked them better before they first flowered. 

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On 2/1/2023 at 1:21 PM, Chester B said:

I liked them better before they first flowered. 

Down the street and not far from where I live, one of the oldest Yucca's in the area that was about over 15 feet tall with multiple branches went into the biggest flowering episodes couple years ago I had ever seen.  The flowers were huge, but then the plant died that fall, is that normal?

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1 hour ago, Banana Belt said:

Down the street and not far from where I live, one of the oldest Yucca's in the area that was about over 15 feet tall with multiple branches went into the biggest flowering episodes couple years ago I had ever seen.  The flowers were huge, but then the plant died that fall, is that normal?

Not that I’m aware of. It must’ve put on that big show because it was on its way out. 

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27 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Not that I’m aware of. It must’ve put on that big show because it was on its way out. 

That's my thinking also.

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Shifting gears a bit but wanted to give an update on my abreojos queen. Remarkably survived those three consecutive nights of 13F, 14F, 14F with no supplemental heat and is pushing new growth in the middle of winter. 

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The larger of my 2 chamaedorea cataractum clumps was completely melted this winter but is already recovering from the roots and looks like it's trying to seed. This was only in the ground since March 2022

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19 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

So uh yea.... we got this going on in February. 

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This happens to me every February. Seems we always get a freakishly warm February, and then winter returns and it gets killed back in March. 

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On 2/18/2023 at 3:43 PM, Buggle said:

This happens to me every February. Seems we always get a freakishly warm February, and then winter returns and it gets killed back in March. 

I never remember February being this warm, typically it's the month I struggle to protect everything from rain followed by constant cold. This year February has been a recovery month for many of my plants

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A few updates...

First up is a very happy lytocaryum insigne (syagrus insignis). this little guy sailed through its first winter in the ground, looks like it may be a winner for me. 

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Next is the Phoenix Roebelenii x Dactylifera also looking very strong after this winter. its suckers are looking more pronounced as well

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And last for the day is the mystery Charleston Phoenix.  This one spear pulled a few weeks ago but luckily pulled through with the help of some hydrogen peroxide. New growth is already pushed out a good bit. Was really worried about this one based on my track record of trying to save small Phoenixes. it will live to see another day. 

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21 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

Next is the Phoenix Roebelenii x Dactylifera also looking very strong after this winter.

How hardy do you think the Robelleni x Dactylifera is? 

Just taking averages I would guess 8b/9a, there are some in the RGV, but that doesnt prove cold hardiness

I'm also wondeing if you protected them, I considering attempting to cross polinate with some family members plants because im pissed the robellenis spear pull so easily and get so many infections and molds 🤢.

Lucas

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1 hour ago, Little Tex said:

How hardy do you think the Robelleni x Dactylifera is? 

Just taking averages I would guess 8b/9a, there are some in the RGV, but that doesnt prove cold hardiness

I'm also wondeing if you protected them, I considering attempting to cross polinate with some family members plants because im pissed the robellenis spear pull so easily and get so many infections and molds 🤢.

I'd be willing to bet the same (8b but closer to 9a) however mine really surprised me this winter. Here's a picture of how I protected it - after I wrapped it I threw a garbage can over it, no supplemental heat. It went through the 3 nights of 13F, 14F, 14F like that with no issues after we started warming up. Also the suckering factor may buy you an extra life during a bad winter. 

I've tried pygmy dates multiple times in the past but it's just a waste of time in my climate. I'm pretty stoked about this cross tho because it's looking a lot like roebelenii but is proving to be much tougher. 

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21 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

I'd be willing to bet the same (8b but closer to 9a) however mine really surprised me this winter. Here's a picture of how I protected it - after I wrapped it I threw a garbage can over it, no supplemental heat. It went through the 3 nights of 13F, 14F, 14F like that with no issues after we started warming up. Also the suckering factor may buy you an extra life during a bad winter. 

I've tried pygmy dates multiple times in the past but it's just a waste of time in my climate. I'm pretty stoked about this cross tho because it's looking a lot like roebelenii but is proving to be much tougher. 

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Well let me know if a sucker can be safely removed, I'll gladly buy it!

Lucas

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40 minutes ago, Little Tex said:

Well let me know if a sucker can be safely removed, I'll gladly buy it!

If i can make it happen I will brother 🤙

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Here is an idea for companion plant next to Palm trees.  The little green "Hardy cyclamens" surrounding the trunk of a Jubeae.  Tough little cyclaman that can take very cold freezing temps, produces little pink flowers in summer but looses all its leaves when hot and dry, but come right back with very attractive follage when the rains come.  They pop up through large rocks and seem to like it.  Its the leaves that are most attractive, very tropical looking.IMG_2370.thumb.JPG.519b3da3592566943f32ea08d3e2abf9.JPG

Edited by Banana Belt
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On 2/22/2023 at 5:20 PM, DAVEinMB said:

And last for the day is the mystery Charleston Phoenix.  This one spear pulled a few weeks ago but luckily pulled through with the help of some hydrogen peroxide. New growth is already pushed out a good bit. Was really worried about this one based on my track record of trying to save small Phoenixes. it will live to see another day. 

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Man i love the droopy fronds. It isnt really something you find a whole lot with really any Phoenix besides roebelenii.

By the way, you should try growing Bismarckia from seed and planting a seedling in a protected spot. You could probably get several years out of them if you get lucky. My bizzy is going on 2 years now, grown from seed in winter of 2021 and planted that summer. It has gone palmate, and i expect good growth from it this year. I should still have several more years of being able to protect it before i let it go. 

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Palms - 4 S. romanzoffiana, 1 W. bifurcata, 4 W. robusta, 1 R. rivularis, 1 B. odorata, 1 B. nobilis, 4 S. palmetto, 1 A. merillii, 2 P. canariensis, 1 BxJ, 1 BxJxBxS, 1 BxS, 3 P. roebelenii, 1 H. lagenicaulis, 1 H. verschaffeltii, 9 T. fortunei, 1 C. humilis, 2 C. macrocarpa, 1 L. chinensis, 1 R. excelsa, 1 S. bermudana, 1 L. nitida

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15 minutes ago, JLM said:

Man i love the droopy fronds. It isnt really something you find a whole lot with really any Phoenix besides roebelenii.

By the way, you should try growing Bismarckia from seed and planting a seedling in a protected spot. You could probably get several years out of them if you get lucky. My bizzy is going on 2 years now, grown from seed in winter of 2021 and planted that summer. It has gone palmate, and i expect good growth from it this year. I should still have several more years of being able to protect it before i let it go. 

Yea i got that Phoenix without any pinnate fronds so I wasn't sure what to expect. The base of the petioles are armed but the leaflets themselves show very little rigidity. I'd love to know what it is cause it's definitely unique looking. 

I've gone back and forth on trying a bizzie for a couple years now. I have one spot left that I think would work but I've been reluctant to pull the trigger. If i did try I'd want to start with a 5gal or larger

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