Jump to content
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

When to plant C. radicalis


Chester B

Recommended Posts

I've got my Dooms Dave radicalis all growing up and was wondering when people think it would be a good time to plant them.  This year or next?  They're currently working on their second frond.  They will be planted in part sun with protection from winter winds.

Thanks

Chamaedorea radicalis.jpg

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm.

I'd wait another couple of years, at least, but spell them outside in the summer as long as you can. Rads are very hardy, and will take temps to about 20, and likely lower with protection.

Portland sounds pretty cold for them, but maybe someone up there can provide more information.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a batch from doomsdave as well this palm is new to me. How long did germination take for you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

Portland sounds pretty cold for them, but maybe someone up there can provide more information

Its an uncommon palm here but fully hardy.  They grow them up in BC as well and we are much hotter in the summer.

 

50 minutes ago, Rickybobby said:

I have a batch from doomsdave as well this palm is new to me. How long did germination take for you?

The seeds were fresh so I think within a week I started seeing results.  If not then under 2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Its an uncommon palm here but fully hardy.  They grow them up in BC as well and we are much hotter in the summer.

 

The seeds were fresh so I think within a week I started seeing results.  If not then under 2.

I stand corrected, so let's just see!

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm assuming they get hardier with size so I'm on the fence if I should put some out this year or wait.  I don't have a greenhouse and keeping dozens of palm seedlings inside in the winter is a pain in the you know what.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Chester B said:

I'm assuming they get hardier with size so I'm on the fence if I should put some out this year or wait.  I don't have a greenhouse and keeping dozens of palm seedlings inside in the winter is a pain in the you know what.

If you're really nutty, you'll find a way! A grow lamp works great. Rads are quite tolerant of low light, though not total darkness.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would wait until they are at least 1g, maybe 3g and fully pinnate even in my warmer climate.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Chester B said:

I've got my Dooms Dave radicalis all growing up and was wondering when people think it would be a good time to plant them.  This year or next?  They're currently working on their second frond.  They will be planted in part sun with protection from winter winds.

Thanks

Chamaedorea radicalis.jpg

I will share my experience with you, though it will come with a few grains of salt. First, I only have one specimen. Second, I got mine at a larger size than yours are currently. I got mine when it was forming it's first mature/pinnate fronds. And lastly, my climate poses different challenges than yours will of course.

I planted my C. radicalis in the ground at my house in Oklahoma City several years ago.  It was in a flower bed next to my front porch and my sidewalk. So it was surrounded by concrete and brick on three sides. It also had pretty good overhead protection from the roof of the house.  But with all of those positives making it a good spot for a marginal palm, it was the northwest wall of my house in a zone 7a city. 

It was only in the ground 2 years before I dug it up to bring it with me when I moved. Over those two winters we saw lows in the 10-12F range. I only ever protected it with a plastic bucket when I expected snow. And that probably did more harm than good when moisture condensed inside the bucket and froze on the leaves. 

It survived both winters easily, but took damage both times. It didn't spear pull and the leaves stayed green through the winter.  But by spring the leaves didn't look like a happy shade of green and they slowly turned brown one by one. The new leaves grew in about as fast as the old ones turned brown though, so it never really defoliated.

I've kept it in a pot since the move and it stays on my porch all winter when temps are above 20F. I stick it in the garage for the nights when the weather gets colder than that.

I hope that gives you some idea of what yours will take through the winters.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Ben OK said:

I will share my experience with you, though it will come with a few grains of salt. First, I only have one specimen. Second, I got mine at a larger size than yours are currently. I got mine when it was forming it's first mature/pinnate fronds. And lastly, my climate poses different challenges than yours will of course.

I planted my C. radicalis in the ground at my house in Oklahoma City several years ago.  It was in a flower bed next to my front porch and my sidewalk. So it was surrounded by concrete and brick on three sides. It also had pretty good overhead protection from the roof of the house.  But with all of those positives making it a good spot for a marginal palm, it was the northwest wall of my house in a zone 7a city. 

It was only in the ground 2 years before I dug it up to bring it with me when I moved. Over those two winters we saw lows in the 10-12F range. I only ever protected it with a plastic bucket when I expected snow. And that probably did more harm than good when moisture condensed inside the bucket and froze on the leaves. 

It survived both winters easily, but took damage both times. It didn't spear pull and the leaves stayed green through the winter.  But by spring the leaves didn't look like a happy shade of green and they slowly turned brown one by one. The new leaves grew in about as fast as the old ones turned brown though, so it never really defoliated.

I've kept it in a pot since the move and it stays on my porch all winter when temps are above 20F. I stick it in the garage for the nights when the weather gets colder than that.

I hope that gives you some idea of what yours will take through the winters.

That is useful - and hopeful - information! :greenthumb:

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes good info thank you.  We rarely ever hit 20F here so I'm not too concerned about larger specimens in site protected from our cold east winds that we get occasionally in the winter.  It's more a matter of how big do I need them before it's safe.  It's not like Dave as an unlimited supply ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see you have several seedlings. I would plant one or two, nothing much to loose and can give a nice head start

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a bunch & they have never been protected. They sailed through that freak freezing rain / snow 16F blast we had in Jan. 2018 without a spot on the leaves. They even held some fruit & continued fruiting as soon as the warm weather was back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, dalmatiansoap said:

I see you have several seedlings. I would plant one or two, nothing much to loose and can give a nice head start

Yes, and another tray of them.  Close to 30.  I might plant 3 in the ground and see what happens.  My goal is to have a couple mass plantings of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Throw them in the ground. If it gets too cold, just throw a moving blanket over them. You're good. 

Longview, Texas :: Record Low: -5F, Feb. 16, 2021 :: Borderline 8A/8B :: '06-'07: 18F / '07-'08: 21F / '08-'09: 21F / '09-'10: 14F / '10-'11: 15F / '11-'12: 24F / '12-'13: 23F / '13-'14: 15F / '14-'15: 20F / '15-'16: 27F / '16-'17: 15F / '17-'18: 8F / '18-'19: 23F / '19-'20: 19F / '20-'21: -5F / '21-'22: 20F / '22-'23: 6F

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

If you rarely get below 20F here is what you might expect if you can give it decent overhead protection. Mine is on a covered porch and only went in the garage when temps were predicted to go below 18F. So mine is in a good spot, but it's roots are above ground during hard freezes.

IMG_20190525_085334.jpg

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait another two years before you plant them all in the ground. But since you have so many go ahead and plant a few to see how they do and most important plant them in groupings to get a nice full look. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/26/2019 at 9:15 AM, Palm crazy said:

most important plant them in groupings to get a nice full look

This was my plan.  I was probably going to plant three clumps of them, so around 10-12 palms per patch.  My only issue is finding space in the areas I think they will do best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...