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Zone 10 Palms in the Orlando Area Mega Thread


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1 hour ago, chad2468emr said:

With how much I miss south Florida, I legitimately think I’d tear up if someone said that to me and tell them it reminds me of home too. Haha!! 

It seems like so many tropicals from South Florida do well around Orlando. Why not just plant the same stuff? There is a poster who has posted pics of coconuts, royal palms, sea grapes, toyal poincianas, etc in the Lakeland area and obviously in this thread from the Orlando area. Is it a problem of availability? If so, I would just take a trip to South Florida and hit up the nurseries and stock up on plants.

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16 hours ago, pj_orlando_z9b said:

I had a lot of work done outside over the past year and EVERY contractor...5 of them...commented on my coconut.  The most common was 'it is so nice to see something unique. Everybody has the same landscape'. Lol. One guy was from Jamaica and said it reminded him of home. 

You do take really good care of that palm!  It always looks great.

One of my neighbors asked me if those were actually coconut palms on the side of the house.  His work took him to Miami frequently, and he always loved seeing them down there.

Oddly enough, I get more questions about the two Veitchia arecina.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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On 5/14/2021 at 9:38 AM, chinandega81 said:

It seems like so many tropicals from South Florida do well around Orlando. Why not just plant the same stuff? There is a poster who has posted pics of coconuts, royal palms, sea grapes, toyal poincianas, etc in the Lakeland area and obviously in this thread from the Orlando area. Is it a problem of availability? If so, I would just take a trip to South Florida and hit up the nurseries and stock up on plants.

Oh, I often do take those trips haha. I have a 15 gal red dwarf coconut, 25 gal teddy, 5 gal s. lieukuensis, k. elegans, plenty of archontos, a few licuala, and more that I’ve gotten when visiting friends + family down there. I’ve also got a royal and others that I’ve been able to source in this area. Almost all of them will be in-ground eventually. Most will do well, and then every 10 years or so there will be a winter they just can’t recover from, even in the best of microclimate placements, but that’s just a fact I’ve learned to accept haha. 

When I say I miss south Florida, it’s also for a lot of reasons outside of just plants / palms. I won’t get all gushy, but coconut palms are definitely a trigger of south Floridian memories for me and the place will always be “home” to me. Hearing someone say the same thing about their home would have honestly probably made me emotional, haha. 

Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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17 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

Oddly enough, I get more questions about the two Veitchia arecina.

This is something I often wonder about. Do a lot of people (outside of friends + family) tend to ask questions when they see palms at your home that are clearly not of the norm for the area? My neighbors all tend to keep to themselves, but I’ve actually got a funny video from a security cam of the Amazon man doing a double take at all my palms AND catching him on the look-back when he walked back to the truck. I’ve caught neighbors looking at them too, but I can’t ever tell if it’s because they think “WOW that dude is crazy and that is an EXCESSIVE amount of palms.” or if it’s out of admiration. 

Video of the Amazon man below. :floor:

Edited by chad2468emr
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Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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11 hours ago, chad2468emr said:

This is something I often wonder about. Do a lot of people (outside of friends + family) tend to ask questions when they see palms at your home that are clearly not of the norm for the area? My neighbors all tend to keep to themselves, but I’ve actually got a funny video from a security cam of the Amazon man doing a double take at all my palms AND catching him on the look-back when he walked back to the truck. I’ve caught neighbors looking at them too, but I can’t ever tell if it’s because they think “WOW that dude is crazy and that is an EXCESSIVE amount of palms.” or if it’s out of admiration. 

Video of the Amazon man below. :floor:

 

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I've had several friends plant a small coconut because they like mine. I warn them of the risks of freezes in Central FL but they find it worth the risk. Here is mine today.

20210515_144936.jpg

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On 18/04/2021 at 07:36, pj_orlando_z9b said:

Noix de coco chez Kaley et Orange 

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What minimum temperature did you have this winter in Orlando and its surroundings ?

 

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12 hours ago, pj_orlando_z9b said:

I've had several friends plant a small coconut because they like mine. I warn them of the risks of freezes in Central FL but they find it worth the risk. Here is mine today.

20210515_144936.jpg

Always makes me so happy and hopeful to see that palm! Absolutely brilliant. 

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Former South Florida resident living in the Greater Orlando Area, zone 9b.

Constantly wishing I could still grow zone 10 palms worry-free, but also trying to appease my strange fixation with Washingtonias. 

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A nice Archontophoenix alexandrae growing in a seemingly open colder area in west Altamonte Springs. It also growing in a neglected landscape. Streetview shows nothing in 2011 and a 3-4ft palm in 2014. Someone has had to have been watering it as this area is sugar sand hills. And yes, someone has asininely painted the trunk. 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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On 5/16/2021 at 10:24 AM, chad2468emr said:

Always makes me so happy and hopeful to see that palm! Absolutely brilliant. 

Thanks :D

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On 5/16/2021 at 10:08 PM, donalt said:

what is the specific variety of your coconut? absolutely beautiful !!

After lots of researching and input from experts, I believe it's a maypan with a larger than normal crown.

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On 5/16/2021 at 2:37 AM, Tommy83 said:

What minimum temperature did you have this winter in Orlando and its surroundings 

Officially 35F at the airport. I was 34F in my backyard. If I recall, there were some upper 20s across some of the less populated outskirts of the city once or twice. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is a Coconut in College Park (Orlando) I have been watching for several years. It was planted small and hasn't looked real good until the past year. Now its finally growing well.

 

 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Beccariophoenix alfreddii looking sharp. Consistent growers, low maintenance palm. Over 8 ft to the top now. 

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Here are some Wodyetia bifurcata growing well in deep shade in my mom's neighborhood just west of downtown Orlando.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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On 2/13/2019 at 8:50 AM, Eric in Orlando said:

Almost all of the Adonidia growing around Orlando have been planted since the 2009-10 winter. I wish Ptychosperma elegans were used instead. They handle long cold/cool better than Adonidia. I see lots of tall trunking Dypsis lutescens around. They have done well through the freezes, some clumps had stems killed back. Lots of mature seeding Caryota mitis and also Wodyetia and Hyophorbe. There is a really big Hyophorbe lagenicaulis on the south side of Lake Underhill I have been watching for years. It was planted around 1993/94. Survived the 1995-96 freezes, 2001 freeze and the 2009-10, 2010-11 winters. But there are some others too that have been long term (15 years) that I see.

Also seeing Archontophoenix get planted again. It was occasionally seen around Orlando decades ago but they were wiped out by the 1983 and 1985 megafreezes. Same with Roystonea.

Eric, I rarely see Ptychosperma elegans or any Ptychosperma species in Orlando but I see Adonidia everywhere. I assumed Christmas palms are much more cold hardy. I am very surprised to see you say that is not the case.  John

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On 10/28/2020 at 9:48 AM, pj_orlando_z9b said:

Found these nice v (?) While golfing at Disney's Lake Buena Vista course. 

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I think these are Archontophoenix cunninghamiana not Veitchia.

 

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On 2/21/2020 at 11:01 AM, Eric in Orlando said:

Green form Bismarckia nobilis

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This is listed as a green  Bismarckia nobilis could it be  aBorassus flabellifer  instead?

 

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On 7/19/2019 at 6:23 AM, FishEyeAquaculture said:

A visit to Sea World yesterday, no idea on the species ID for these two separate palms...any ideas?

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Kentiopsis oliformis

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, John of Ponce said:

Eric, I rarely see Ptychosperma elegans or any Ptychosperma species in Orlando but I see Adonidia everywhere. I assumed Christmas palms are much more cold hardy. I am very surprised to see you say that is not the case.  John

Adonidia is what all the growers in SoFL are sending up. They do grow Ptychosperma elegans but I hardly ever see any being brought up. 

Its my long term observations after the winter of 1995-96 and 2009-10 that makes me believe P. elegans is hardier than Adonidia.  Both are very similar in cold hardiness but P. elegans is much more cool hardy, Adonidia can't take long spells of cool after having a freeze. Ptychosperma elegans and P. macarthurii should be used more in protected microclimates instead of Adonidia.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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20 hours ago, John of Ponce said:

This is listed as a green  Bismarckia nobilis could it be  aBorassus flabellifer  instead?

 

Definitely green form of Bismarckia.

 

 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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1 hour ago, Eric in Orlando said:

 Ptychosperma elegans and P. macarthurii should be used more in protected microclimates instead of Adonidia.

P Macarthurii actually seems pretty cold tolerant, I definitely agree with using that over Adonidia in Central Florida.

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Westchase | 9b 10a  ◆  Nokomis | 10a  ◆  St. Petersburg | 10a 10b 

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2 hours ago, Eric in Orlando said:

Adonidia is what all the growers in SoFL are sending up. They do grow Ptychosperma elegans but I hardly ever see any being brought up. 

Its my long term observations after the winter of 1995-96 and 2009-10 that makes me believe P. elegans is hardier than Adonidia.  Both are very similar in cold hardiness but P. elegans is much more cool hardy, Adonidia can't take long spells of cool after having a freeze. Ptychosperma elegans and P. macarthurii should be used more in protected microclimates instead of Adonidia.

In my giant sized sample of 1, I found the same issue with Adonidia.  One freeze and then a week of cool weather later, and my triple Adonidia croaked.  So far my Ptychosperma Macarthurii is doing great, handling the 28F with frost and 30F with heavy frost with only a bit of spotting.  It was likely protected by a big clump of Selloum on one side and 15-20' tall Dypsis Pembana and Bambusa Eutoldoides Viridi-Vittata on the left side of my pathway.  But it has pushed out new leaves pretty quick this spring and seems to be a fast grower.  I had planted out some 6-10" tall seedlings in 2 other spots.  One burned pretty bad, the other was unaffected.  Below are two other underrated palms in my yard.  From front to back: Dictyosperma Album/Rubrum took a little spotting damage, Cycas Simplicipinna unfazed, P. Macarthurii some spotting, Elaeis Guineensis was unfazed.  The bigger one at the top is Arenga Pinnata and took about 50% burn.

790541836_P1080472cropped.thumb.JPG.f73fc928c7286ee81aba1ed0d9790c6d.JPG

 

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No pics but I recently spotted 2 new commercial plantings of Roystonea;

1. downtown Orlando at the Dr. Phillips Performing Arts Center, on the corners of orange Ave. and South St. and Orange and Anderson

2. new townhouses in Winter Park on the south side of Lee Rd between I-4 and 17/92.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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57 minutes ago, Eric in Orlando said:

No pics but I recently spotted 2 new commercial plantings of Roystonea;

1. downtown Orlando at the Dr. Phillips Performing Arts Center, on the corners of orange Ave. and South St. and Orange and Anderson

2. new townhouses in Winter Park on the south side of Lee Rd between I-4 and 17/92.

I saw those at the Dr. Phillips Center this morning.  There are also lots of Adonidia there as well.  The question I have is this, did the City of Orlando specifically request these?  Or, is this the work of a professional landscape contractor recommending these trees?

These should do very well based on what is growing directly across the street at Orlando City Hall.  And, just around the corner there are lots of Z10 palms (and other plants) growing on the North side of South Street between Rosalind and Magnolia,

What do you think?

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Winter Springs (Orlando area), Florida

Zone 9b/10a

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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On 6/25/2021 at 11:53 AM, ck_in_fla said:

I saw those at the Dr. Phillips Center this morning.  There are also lots of Adonidia there as well.  The question I have is this, did the City of Orlando specifically request these?  Or, is this the work of a professional landscape contractor recommending these trees?

These should do very well based on what is growing directly across the street at Orlando City Hall.  And, just around the corner there are lots of Z10 palms (and other plants) growing on the North side of South Street between Rosalind and Magnolia,

What do you think?

That downtown core is very warm with all the buildings and concrete. They should be fine from any freezes other than a '89 type. Just a couple blocks away is a mature Roystonea borinquena. Its on South St. on the south side of a parking garage. I planted it as a trio in 2004 a block away at the Methodist Church.  One got wiped out by a car. The other 2 were moved years ago to the present location when the church building was rebuilt. One grew poorly and died.  The living one is flowering and seeding.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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On 6/28/2021 at 8:33 AM, Eric in Orlando said:

That downtown core is very warm with all the buildings and concrete. They should be fine from any freezes other than a '89 type. Just a couple blocks away is a mature Roystonea borinquena. Its on South St. on the south side of a parking garage. I planted it as a trio in 2004 a block away at the Methodist Church.  One got wiped out by a car. The other 2 were moved years ago to the present location when the church building was rebuilt. One grew poorly and died.  The living one is flowering and seeding.

It seems like Royals are bullet proof in Orlando in general, sans a massive and unusually sharp cold snap. I'm surprised more people don't plant them in their landscape....the established tree canopy would help them from cool winter nights and by the time they broke through the canopy, they would be mature enough to weather the typically cool winter nights (I would think). Am I underestimating Orlando's warmth, or is this due to a lack of availability for the average person? I know in South Florida, although very common, it is extremely rare to find small royals for sale. Even large ones aren't sold at most nurseries or nig box stores. They are exlsuively planted mature in almost all cases. The only small ones are volunteers from underneath the larger specimens. 

I would love to see the Royal palm spread throughout Orlando and Tampa as it seems like they should do quite well if people are planting other tropicals in these areas.

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I see more Royals popping up around abut almost all are bigger, landscape sizes. I'm kind of glad smaller, container Royals aren't commonly sold. So many would be planted in wrong locations size-wise, like Foxtails and Queens. And there would be a lot of Royals planted and neglected. At least most people spending money on these bigger specimens are more apt to care for the money they spent. Look how many smaller container Majesties are planted and look fugly and die within a couple years.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Heres a couple Royals growing in College Park on the east side of Lake Fairview.

 

 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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and a big Seagrape (Coccoloba uvifera) growing in the same neighborhood.

 

 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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Stumbled across a large Arenga Engleri in oviedo. 
considering the growth rate of the one in my yard, I have to assume this is at least 200 years old. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

There’s also a royal and a decent size cocos nucifera growing on the south shore of Lake Concord. You can see them when you take the Colonial exit on I4 heading west. I noticed them a few years ago. There are also some Royals planted outside the back  entrance to the Alfond Inn in Winter Park. 
 

Btw, this is my first time posting on Palmtalk but I’ve been following the forum for a while and really appreciate all the knowledge as a palm newbie!

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@Midnight Gardener Welcome to PalmTalk!  Love the username!

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone (2012): 9b | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (1985, 1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a | 30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Thanks @kinzyjr. There have been many a time where I am working in the garden late in the day, it gets dark and I’m running around late into the evening with a headlamp on. I’m sure my neighbors think I’m crazy!

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2 hours ago, Midnight Gardener said:

I’m sure my neighbors think I’m crazy!

Welcome @Midnight Gardener!  My neighbors think I'm crazy often working after dark. I'm not an early morning guy so evening into night when it's cooler works for me.

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I was at SeaWorld this past week, lots of nice palms growing there. I took a bunch of photos so will be posting them over the next few days.

There are several mature Hyophorbe verschaffeltii growing near the waterfront. Here are a couple.

 

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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a short, flowering Arenga pinnata and Chamaedorea seifrizii.

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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More from SeaWorld...

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis and a Pseudophoenix sargentii (with a Copernicia alba).

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Eric

Orlando, FL

zone 9b/10a

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