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Licuala Peltata indoors in New York help needed


Strangeinternet

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Hey all,

I got my first Peltata two weeks ago from a Florida nursery..about 36" tall and 4 fans/spears. I'm in New York City and trying to figure out to the best indoor care strategy especially re: light.

I'm not letting the soil dry out and misting 2x a day which seems straightforward but as for light I've seen a lot of conflicting notes. It's an understory palm that needs shade outdoors but it seemed dangerous to treat it like a low-light indoors plant. Looking for some experienced advice on lighting. Right now, I have it about 3" ft from a southern facing window that gets about 5 hours of full sun this time of year but I can raise or lower a solar shade on. Is it going to burn in full sun? Any tips would be much appreciated,

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Hey there @Strangeinternet!

Is it a Licuala peltata var. 'sumawongii' or L. peltata var. peltata (entire or split leaf?)

If it's a sumawongii, sounds like you're doing everything right. From what I've heard and from my own little experience, these palms seem to tolerate an array of environmental conditions.

I live in Socal and I've got mine in a one gallon pot, receives a few hours of morning sun and is doing well. I even leave it out through colder nights into the high 30s (yeah, us California's are wusses and think the 30s are cold, but the palms do too! lol).

Cool to see you growing this indoors in NY! Lets see some pictures and let us know how it goes!

20190201_071111.jpg

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Awesome-- thanks for the feedback. It is indeed sumawongii. I figured I'd see leaf burn if it didn't like the sun but the leaves are so pristine right now that I didn't want to experiment too much. I caught some spider mites on it a few days ago that I think I took care of but besides that, seems to be happy. There was a new, fully-closed spear in there when I got it and it's slowly opening up, so I figured monitoring the progress and color on that is another way to gauge things. I'm a novice with palms, but these are one of the most beautiful ones out there in my opinion. Here are two pics from just after I got it..can't take much credit except for finding a nursery that would ship to me!

IMG-4854.JPG

IMG-4858.JPG

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Strangeinternet:  That is a beautiful Sumawongii!  I also have been growing my potted Sumawongii in a south window during the cold months and it seems very happy.  When the exposure begins to get hotter in March or so, I will draw a sheer curtain if light seems to be too strong.  Outdoors, I keep it in dappled sunlight to shade.  Being in a small pot in well draining mix, it drinks alot of water.  I give it the lift test, if it seems too light in weight relative to just watered weight---- it gets watered.  You'll be able to gauge it after awhile.  I dilute liquid fertilizer and apply it every other watering.  I am surprised that it pushes growth even in the dark, short days time of winter; but south window gives it the most natural light we northern States can offer.  Some pics below:  when 1st purchased in 2017 and then current pic in 2019.  I may repot it this spring.  Other pic is the sunny south window with Sumawongii and its friend Joey passing the winter months.

 

1272557329_Sumawongiijune2017.thumb.jpg.ab553bc565a1b369611ea626081a6682.jpg1833065259_Sumawongiijan2019.thumb.jpg.54363ca614b2003f0682473f70e925fa.jpg1460877810_winter2019palms.thumb.jpg.04b5c4eac838e77db9123de8244292df.jpg

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Oh how stunning is your specimen!! My sumawongii can take all day filtered (by lanai screen) Florida sun, so I'm thinking yours will love that window location. Just check the leaves daily to ensure they're not getting much lighter in color.

 

EDIT: WELCOME TO PALMTALK!! :yay:

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Naples (inland), FL - technically 10a but more like 9b in the winter :hmm:

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Thanks everyone! Week later: the spear that was probably starting to come out when it was still at the nursery in florida seems to have stalled, but what can I expect? Otherwise seems to be doing just fine. Wondering if it's worth fertilizing or waiting until spring...what exactly are the downsides to year-round fertilizing a slow growing palm like this?

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I would not fertilize in the winter at all and even during the growing season I would only apply fertilizer once or maybe twice and sparingly at that. It all too easy to over-fertilize and end up with a crummy looking plant. Your palm should have ample nutrients in the soil if properly mixed. 

Your palm probably stalled because it's dealing with the shock of having moved from a comfy Florida greenhouse to an indoor location in a large city. However, if properly cared for, it should recover in about a month and resume growth. 

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  • 1 year later...

Hello fellow planty friends, 
For context, I just received my first Licuala Peltata var Sumawongii palm (20cm pot) in the mail yesterday and have never grown a palm indoors before. I want the best for my expensive palm baby and was wondering what soil would be best for this species? 
I did some searching online and some people said ' 1/2 seramis and 1/2 pine bark mix' is the best, as it is fast draining. But Seramis is not readily available in Australia; so would you say a standard potting mix with 30% sand suffice? or even just an orchid soil mix?
Also, could I get some watering tips for this palm? does it like to dry out, etc.

Thank you very much! 

 

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Hello, are you able to find Leca clay spheres or anything similar used for hydroponics culture?  Maybe you can try Am*zon or EB*y.  I have been using 1/3 Lec;a; 1/3 orchid bark mix, and 1/3 houseplant potting soil mix (peat &perlite).  I cannot find Seramis either.  My Licualas seem to be very happy with the mix.  Do not use too large a pot for the roots.  I water when the top 1 or 2 inches feels dry.  When in doubt on watering I usually give an extra day to decide to water.  Here you can see the Leca spheres in the root ball; also my Licuala Peltata 'Peltata and Licuala Peltata 'Sumawongii' below.

WP_20190525_16_51_07_Pro.thumb.jpg.6287fcd50ee29269acbfa5f4b08e53e6.jpg2121091994_LpeltataSumawongiiandLpeltataPeltata.thumb.jpg.371476ba495542de63d2a7c75147638f.jpg

Edited by piping plovers
added another photo
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  • 2 months later...

 

On 9/27/2020 at 4:00 AM, htc5353 said:

Hi everybody. I think my Licuala flower is dying. All leaves are dry. I think it's because I watered too much. How can I save the plant? Can you please help?

 

That is very sad. Probably it is beyond saving if all the leaves are dried out. This happens sometimes.  Overwatering can kill. You could try changing the soil and treating it with hydrogen peroxide after letting it dry a bit.

Or, depending on how waterlogged it is, say if its already dry, try the h2o2 now. My idea of this is that you are killing the fungus or other pathogens of the rot from overwatering. Pictures also can help with diagnosing and treatment advice on here.

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This is, next to Licuala cordata (and Lodoicea, which is almost like a mythical creature, since it is almost impossible to obtain) my favorite palmate species of palm.  It is even showing promise in 10a areas like Orlando, Downtown Lakeland, FL and parts of the Tampa area.  Definitely one of the most cold hardy Licuala species.

IPS member Kinzyjr, Jeremy was so kind as to pick one up for me at the sale today since I couldn't make it.  Thank you Jeremy.

-Michael

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27.09.2020 tarihinde saat 13: 00'da htc5353 şunu söyledi:

Selam millet. Sanırım Licuala çiçeğim ölüyor. Bütün yapraklar kuru. Sanırım çok fazla suladığım için. Bitkiyi nasıl kurtarabilirim? Yardım edebilir misin lütfen?

 

The first and last versions are attached. Do you think their roots are alive? I am very sad.Do you think it comes alive again? How long does new leaf emergence take? Does anyone know?

417EBF0B-D8A3-424A-B086-2EEC8B152100.jpeg

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C4B5DA7C-439E-4AF4-9930-4C918F52D0C6.jpeg

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I am not aware of any palm coming back from that state. They can lose fronds but if they lose them all or even the growth tip, it's over. I'm sorry for your loss.

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On 10/6/2020 at 2:28 AM, htc5353 said:

This morning I noticed this tiny leaf on the ground. Do you think this could be licuala?

FA4D137B-C98E-40E8-BC89-7177D969E504.jpeg

That would awesome...Can you zoom in even closer?

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You can watch the central point where all the leaves join together and see if another leaf spear emerges from the center.  If nothing appears within 4-6 weeks then it is likely dead.  

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I bought and planted licuala seeds. Of course I don't know if the seeds are real.After breaking the outer shell and keeping the seed inside in water for a few days, I planted it into the soil.

D46C2984-6BFF-4C04-BDE6-3E2C2F19CE00.jpeg

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21 hours ago, htc5353 said:

I bought and planted licuala seeds. Of course I don't know if the seeds are real.After breaking the outer shell and keeping the seed inside in water for a few days, I planted it into the soil.

D46C2984-6BFF-4C04-BDE6-3E2C2F19CE00.jpeg

Those look like my licuala peltata (sumawongi) seeds looked. Probably legit.

Just putting them in the soil might work, but they can take a very long time to germinate. There are other threads here you can check out on the subject:

For more particular methods check out my:

"Help! Veteran Germinators Advice Needed" thread.

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  • 4 weeks later...

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