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So after looking at the new Florida hardiness map thread, I went on a search to find one that is unofficially updated for Virginia. 

VirginiaUSDAZonesMap2018.png

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PalmTreeDude

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This map seems accurate. Do you know if there is any Sabal palmettos being grown in the 8a areas north of VA beach? Like around the Chesapeake bay. 

Zone 8a Greenville, NC 

Zone 8b/9a Bluffton, SC

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21 minutes ago, NC_Palms said:

This map seems accurate. Do you know if there is any Sabal palmettos being grown in the 8a areas north of VA beach? Like around the Chesapeake bay. 

I believe there are some up along the James River. I saw one in Isle of Wight county years ago with a full head of fronds. I am also pretty sure all of the Eastern Shore, especially Northampton County, can grow Sabal palmetto, as a matter of fact, I am not sure why the are not everywhere there since it is a peninsula surrounded by water, so I would assume they tend not to get as much of extremes as I do inland. I know right along the coast gets beat up with winds though. 

PalmTreeDude

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11 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I believe there are some up along the James River. I saw one in Isle of Wight county years ago with a full head of fronds. I am also pretty sure all of the Eastern Shore, especially Northampton County, can grow Sabal palmetto, as a matter of fact, I am not sure why the are not everywhere there since it is a peninsula surrounded by water, so I would assume they tend not to get as much of extremes as I do inland. I know right along the coast gets beat up with winds though. 

It’s surprising to me that Virginia Beach is full of palmettos yet they disappear when you cross over into Cape Charles. I would suspect that the Virginia eastern shore would be milder then Virginia Beach, since it’s almost completely surrounded by water. I would guess that the cold winds in the winter would be a cause, but i would imagine that palmettos would do fine when protected from the winds. 

I’ve also heard people say that the Cape Charles is a weak 8b climate. It would make sense due to the fact that Kitty Hawk is 8b. 

Zone 8a Greenville, NC 

Zone 8b/9a Bluffton, SC

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21 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I believe there are some up along the James River. I saw one in Isle of Wight county years ago with a full head of fronds. I am also pretty sure all of the Eastern Shore, especially Northampton County, can grow Sabal palmetto, as a matter of fact, I am not sure why the are not everywhere there since it is a peninsula surrounded by water, so I would assume they tend not to get as much of extremes as I do inland. I know right along the coast gets beat up with winds though. 

 

There was a palmetto on the Maryland eastern shore some years ago but got mistreated. They essentially cooked it with lights from what I heard. I doubt the eastern shore (MD or VA) could do full crown palettes as the wind can get pretty bitter and salty there. 

 

9 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

It’s surprising to me that Virginia Beach is full of palmettos yet they disappear when you cross over into Cape Charles. I would suspect that the Virginia eastern shore would be milder then Virginia Beach, since it’s almost completely surrounded by water. I would guess that the cold winds in the winter would be a cause, but i would imagine that palmettos would do fine when protected from the winds. 

I’ve also heard people say that the Cape Charles is a weak 8b climate. It would make sense due to the fact that Kitty Hawk is 8b. 

 

I think the Atlantic winds are too salty and bitter in the winter at times as I hear more bn inland palms do better than at the beach this far north.

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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2 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

I think the Atlantic winds are too salty and bitter in the winter at times as I hear more bn inland palms do better than at the beach this far north.

I have noticed this in the Outer Banks. it’s hard to find palmettos with a full crown anywhere on those barrier islands but when you travel to Roanoake island or to the mainland, they pop up often 

Zone 8a Greenville, NC 

Zone 8b/9a Bluffton, SC

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