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Low Humidity


bubba
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Here on the equator summer seems to have started.  The temperature at 6 PM is 88 F and the humidity is 62 percent.  There are dry air alerts in areas of central Brazil like Brasilia where the humidity is in the teens.

This is about as dry as it ever gets here.  It looks like our low humidity days are sort of like the day in Oceanside.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

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(amazondk @ Jun. 22 2007,15:09)

QUOTE
This is about as dry as it ever gets here.  It looks like our low humidity days are sort of like the day in Oceanside.

dk

But you get that nice heat too. It will probably be July before we "regularly" see 80+F.

BS

Zone 10a at best after 2007 AND 2013, on SW facing hill, 1 1/2 miles from coast in Oceanside, CA. 30-98 degrees, and 45-80deg. about 95% of the time.

"The great workman of nature is time."

"Genius is nothing but a great aptitude for patience."

-George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon-

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Routine summer pattern last few weeks.  Vacillating humidity depending on strength of marine layer [weakening inland] 80-90F/26-32c w/ warmer nights reflecting ocean temps [64-72F/17-22c].  

Developing Sonoran HI looks potentially wicked but more likely east of coastal California

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

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(BS, Man about Palms @ Jun. 22 2007,22:55)

QUOTE

(amazondk @ Jun. 22 2007,15:09)

QUOTE
This is about as dry as it ever gets here.  It looks like our low humidity days are sort of like the day in Oceanside.

dk

But you get that nice heat too. It will probably be July before we "regularly" see 80+F.

BS

BS,

That is true.  It looks like we have finally moved into the dry season weather pattern.  So, it will probably we around December until we regularly see highs below 90 F.  The night time temperatures never vary much though averaging around 70 to 74 F.  

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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(amazondk @ Jun. 25 2007,10:22)

QUOTE

(BS @ Man about Palms,Jun. 22 2007,22:55)

QUOTE

(amazondk @ Jun. 22 2007,15:09)

QUOTE
This is about as dry as it ever gets here.  It looks like our low humidity days are sort of like the day in Oceanside.

dk

But you get that nice heat too. It will probably be July before we "regularly" see 80+F.

BS

BS,

That is true.  It looks like we have finally moved into the dry season weather pattern.  So, it will probably we around December until we regularly see highs below 90 F.  The night time temperatures never vary much though averaging around 70 to 74 F.  

dk

Its funny we havea monsson season(wind direction change) that brings humidity(40-45%), but not that much rain(maybe 2-3 inches), while in other parts of the world "monsoon" means flooding rains.  Brazil has a dry season(60% humidity), while the Arizona wet season is less humid, and the dry season -currently underway- has yielded a bunch of 103-110 degree days with RH in the 4-7% range in the last 2 weeks.  I actually saw 4% relative humidity on 3 different days.  Its so dry, my partly shaded roses are popouri days after blooming, and my palms are all anxiously awaiting the monsoon break in humidity.  Enjoy your dry season Don, sounds excellent for growing palms, as does your wet season.

Tom

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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Tom,

For the most part the clmate is great for growing most anything tropical.  When we get a prolonged period of no or little rain, 30 days or so, things get real baked.  That is without irrigation.  The equatorial sun is real intense even if there are only 12 hours of daylight.  In the forest the humidity under the canopy tends to keep things moist for the most part.  The month with the least amount of rain is around 80 mms.  I don't think that the humidity here ever gets much below 50 percent if that.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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The dry season has arrived here in full force.  This morning is a pretty typical dry season weather pattern.  The temperature at 800 am is 75 F and the humidity is 83 percent.  The dew point is 70 F.  The forecast high is 88 F which is still a bit low.  But, if it does not rain later in the day it will probably come in at around 93 F or so.

dk

Don Kittelson

 

LIFE ON THE RIO NEGRO

03° 06' 07'' South 60° 01' 30'' West

Altitude 92 Meters / 308 feet above sea level

1,500 kms / 932 miles to the mouth of the Amazon River

 

Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil - A Cidade da Floresta

Where the world´s largest Tropical Rainforest embraces the Greatest Rivers in the World. .

82331.gif

 

Click here to visit Amazonas

amazonas2.jpg

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(amazondk @ Jun. 27 2007,21:44)

QUOTE
The dry season has arrived here in full force.  This morning is a pretty typical dry season weather pattern.  The temperature at 800 am is 75 F and the humidity is 83 percent.  The dew point is 70 F.  The forecast high is 88 F which is still a bit low.  But, if it does not rain later in the day it will probably come in at around 93 F or so.

dk

I'd give my left *** for weather like that right now!

Here's a good link on temperature observations for humans...

Apparent Temperature

Daryl

Gold Coast, Queensland Latitude 28S. Mild, Humid Subtropical climate. Rainfall - not consistent enough!

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  • 1 month later...

We just got back from Jackson Hole, Wyoming. We arrived in a heat wave and the temperature hit 105 F. It felt to us like 85 F tops.Although there were no palms, the lack of humidity was heaven for those of us used to 90 F and 90% humidity. You Westeners are very lucky during the summer months.

What you look for is what is looking

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You Westeners are very lucky during the summer months.

Bubba

Agree that low humidity levels are common in the western half of the US but it can become rather uncomfortable during monsoon episodes.  Dew points above 70 degrees on south winds when the air temp is above 100F occurs in the deserts of California/Arizona & that is understandably quite miserable for human comfort but fine for palms.

Coastal SoCal can also become a bit nasty when heat & humidity move in though generally by late Sept the tropical connection ends and very dry/warmth takes over for another month.

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

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(happ @ Aug. 03 2007,12:52)

QUOTE
You Westeners are very lucky during the summer months.

Bubba

Agree that low humidity levels are common in the western half of the US but it can become rather uncomfortable during monsoon episodes.  Dew points above 70 degrees on south winds when the air temp is above 100F occurs in the deserts of California/Arizona & that is understandably quite miserable for human comfort but fine for palms.

Coastal SoCal can also become a bit nasty when heat & humidity move in though generally by late Sept the tropical connection ends and very dry/warmth takes over for another month.

This is true, that monsoon season can be the most uncomfortable time of the year.  typically, dewpoints of 55-60F can occur with 105-108 degree heat.  This is more uncomfortable than 110-112F (in the shade) and dry, for sure.  But so far(fingers crossed) this year, the dews have been 60+ and the max daytime temps have been under 101 F mostly, not so bad.  My palms are loving it, they are mostly heat loving species(braheas, bismarckias, queens, butias, sabals) and I am getting unprecedented growth from them.  The temps have even been tolerable for humans, mostly.  Some days have had nice cloud cover and max temps in the low 90's.  I know that cant last, though, and I am expecting the heat to pick up and the clouds to dissipate.  Just to show what evaporative cooling can do, one day I was driving home from work at 99 degrees F, and I drive into a cloudburst, nice rain.  By the time I got home, 20 minutes later, it was 80 degrees F(70% RH) and very nice for me, and for all my palms.  Funny thing about arizona is that humidity is patchy, so even when its raining, the relative humidity is often only 65-70%.  Back east, rain meant RH>90%, not so here.  Highest humidity I have recorded( I have a max temp, humidity recorder for each day) this year was only 80%.  Strange weather here in AZ, it can change so quickly that I have seen rain drop the temps from 110F to 80F degrees in 40 minutes in a downpour.  I can also drive 45 minutes in summer, and without rain, drop the ambient temps by 25-30 degrees F with 4500' elevation change.  It mostly isnt hard to take, just go to the high country or hit the pool in summer.  I do wish for better weather for growing palms though.  The dry/ hot and the potential for cold really rules out many very nice palms.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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Some years ago I was day driving from Orlando, Florida  to St. Pete in July and noticed how few people I saw outdoors.  It was a weird feeling to see hardly anyone outside (even in highly populated areas) - kind of depressing actually.  

While visiting Disneyworld and standing in line outside waiting for rides or food or whatever I noticed how heat and humidity affects people differently.  Some were wet in persperation, others quite dry and looking reasonably comfortable.  Seems the heavier ones suffer the most.  Those were some of my observations.

For year round living I don't think I've found a more delightful climate for both people and plants than here where we live in south Kona at our elevation (see below).  Just the right temperatures and humidity levels to suite me fine.  Traveling to other areas of the world makes me appreciate it even more.  There's a popular saying here and it goes like this:  "Lucky you live Hawaii".  And I don't take it for granted anymore.

Hawaii Island (Big Island), leeward coast, 19 degrees N. latitude, south Kona mauka at approx. 380m (1,250 ft.) and about 1.6 km (1-mile) upslope from ocean.

 

No record of a hurricane passing over this island (yet!).  

Summer maximum rainfall - variable averaging 900-1150mm (35-45") - Perfect drainage on black volcanic rocky soil.  

Nice sunsets!

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(Al in Kona @ Aug. 04 2007,21:33)

QUOTE
Some years ago I was day driving from Orlando, Florida  to St. Pete in July and noticed how few people I saw outdoors.  It was a weird feeling to see hardly anyone outside (even in highly populated areas) - kind of depressing actually.  

While visiting Disneyworld and standing in line outside waiting for rides or food or whatever I noticed how heat and humidity affects people differently.  Some were wet in persperation, others quite dry and looking reasonably comfortable.  Seems the heavier ones suffer the most.  Those were some of my observations.

For year round living I don't think I've found a more delightful climate for both people and plants than here where we live in south Kona at our elevation (see below).  Just the right temperatures and humidity levels to suite me fine.  Traveling to other areas of the world makes me appreciate it even more.  There's a popular saying here and it goes like this:  "Lucky you live Hawaii".  And I don't take it for granted anymore.

The heat and humidity combine to limit the bodys ability to keep the core temp stable.  Things that heat up the body, like exercise, sun, hot temps combined with things that limit the natural cooling process(evaporation of sweat, heat radiations) like insulation(fat), humidity, can make anyone uncomfortable as the body struggles to regulate its core temp.  People with extra weight must exert more energy(exercise) in ametaboilic sense so heat in general(humid or dry heat) will be more difficult for them.  Hawaii never gets too hot so the humidity doesnt come into play as much as florida or arizona in the humid monsoon season.  I have a trip scheduled for Kauai in september, and this arizona monsoon season is really making me look forward to it.  San diego is very easy to take with the cold ocean limiting ambient temps as well.  Of course the hawaii winters are the best, so yes I vote for hawaii as most comfortable climate and elevation will make it cooler yet.  Now if I can only find a job there!

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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Al

Agree, hands down, that Hawaii [particularly at your elevation] is the most comfortable  :P  Truly paradise!

Watching dew points, as I do, it is interestingly that coastal SoCal is as humid as lowland Hawaii during summer.  But the Islands never deal with strong blowtorch winds w/ single digit dewpoints/humidity  :o

Los Angeles/Pasadena

34° 10' N   118° 18' W

Elevation: 910'/278m

January Average Hi/Lo: 69F/50F

July Average Hi/Lo: 88F/66F

Average Rainfall: 19"/48cm

USDA 11/Sunset 23

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/queryF?MTW

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