Jump to content

Recommended Posts

21 hours ago, GeneAZ said:

I feel that the last three images are nubimontanus, not dyer.  Beautiful plant.

Gene it is possible, as I acquired a nubimontanus of the same size and same time band, so I can't rule out that I accidentally flipped the labels on the two.  Unfortunately, that nubi got stepped on  and set back shortly after I put it into the ground.   So I transplanted it to a different spot where it was struggling to recover, pushing out a single leaf at a time.  About a month ago I noticed it again got stepped on or run over by a dog, so there is no way to confirm if that one is the dyer as it has no foliage.  Fortunately, I do have another larger nubimontanus too.   No recent closeups of the leaflets on this one, but it is distinctly different in appearance.  Color is more grey green on this one and the other plant has more of a battleship grey/blue color.  Also as you can see very little twist to the leaves, much more straight.  They are adjacent to each other so pretty easy to compare.  Lots of diversity and forms within each of these two species.

20210731-BH3I4883.jpg

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Giving a "Holler out" on this interesting pup.  Danke Gisela, I'm enjoying watch this flush open!

20220124-BH3I6606.jpg

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Superb flush on this Cycas debaoensis x 7 fronds here

20220125_091658.thumb.jpg.8662f82ca1f35d8a39e0e2e9e9740107.jpg

..eagerly awaiting a flush on multipinnata after a heap of seeds and then another flowering .

This Zamia neurophyllidia has finally given me a decent flush.

20220125_092253.thumb.jpg.66b2f9db9c1264a536cf489389bcf205.jpg

 

  • Like 3

Michael in palm paradise,

Tully, wet tropics in Australia, over 4 meters of rain every year.

Home of the Golden Gumboot, its over 8m high , our record annual rainfall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, aussiearoids said:

Zamia neurophyllidia has finally given me a decent flush

Beautiful cycads.... the Zamia in particular, perhaps because it is one that doesn't seem to like our cool winter temps (I can't grow succressfully) and has those nice big ornamental leaflets.  I'm curious about your C debaoensis whether it is male or female?  I have one that is much fuller and holds more leaves than my other two.  The one that holds more leaves gets more sun, but it is female, the other two get less sun but are both male.  I was curious if the correlation was more with sun exposure of if there might also be a correlation with the sex of the plant and how many leaves they flush with.  In that the female and one male plant are growing in the same soil, I doubt that is a factor in my case.

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the Zamia's that does well here for me is Zamia standleyi.  It's long narrow leaflets and long petiole's provide a nice contrast adjacent to the Monstera.  It's one of my favorite Zamias that I can actually grow.  It can wait a while between flushes and push sequential cones without flushing, but definitely a worthy plant to allocate some space to in the garden.

20220127-BH3I6666.jpg

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/24/2022 at 12:39 PM, Tracy said:

Giving a "Holler out" on this interesting pup.  Danke Gisela, I'm enjoying watch this flush open!

20220124-BH3I6606.jpg

Hey Tracy, cool looking plant!  I'm assuming this was one of George's hybrids?  Do you know the mix?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, Firepalm said:

Hey Tracy, cool looking plant!  I'm assuming this was one of George's hybrids?  Do you know the mix?

There is E ferox in the mix and Gisela shared that it had some other things going on, but I don't think I understood correctly.   I will have to get my understanding clear from her before I report back.  Yes, the wine bottle sort of gives away who was responsible for the plant.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome! The last couple times I visited George, he mentioned that he was attempting several Ferox crosses, but was not having much success (not too surprising given that pretty much everyone has struggled getting Ferox to hybridize).  Will be fun to watch it grow up and see how it turns out!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who doesn't love their Encephalartos horridus, especially when they have a nice big cone!  Yes a little exaggerated due to the fisheye view, but still spectacular!

20220128-BH3I6718.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Tracy said:

Who doesn't love their Encephalartos horridus, especially when they have a nice big cone!  Yes a little exaggerated due to the fisheye view, but still spectacular!

20220128-BH3I6718.jpg

wow thats spectacular tracy!

"delectare et movere"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

My newest planting is currently my favorite cycad.  I've been planning to get this one in the ground for a couple of months now, but needed to dig up something else to make room for it.  I'm looking forward to watching it grow with other cycads in the garden.

20220412-BH3I7360.jpg

20220412-BH3I7357.jpg

20220410-BH3I7325.jpg

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My favorite cycad is sago (yawn), because the other two (C. debaoensis and a hybrid) are doing nothing after two years. I'd guess that they are struggling in the root system underneath the canopy of the live oak but the C. revoluta are flourishing there.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly C. revoluta is one of the most beautiful cycads, especially when local climate keeps CAS away, nothing beats that deep, shiny green. We’re lucky that’s the one that went to mass market. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Tracy said:

My newest planting is currently my favorite cycad.  I've been planning to get this one in the ground for a couple of months now, but needed to dig up something else to make room for it.  I'm looking forward to watching it grow with other cycads in the garden.

20220412-BH3I7360.jpg

20220412-BH3I7357.jpg

20220410-BH3I7325.jpg

Quite a bit of latifrons in that one, I dare say -- which helps any hybrid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Tracy said:

My newest planting is currently my favorite cycad.  I've been planning to get this one in the ground for a couple of months now, but needed to dig up something else to make room for it.  I'm looking forward to watching it grow with other cycads in the garden.

20220412-BH3I7360.jpg

20220412-BH3I7357.jpg

20220410-BH3I7325.jpg

Very nice Tracy!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Manalto said:

My favorite cycad is sago (yawn), because the other two (C. debaoensis and a hybrid) are doing nothing after two years. I'd guess that they are struggling in the root system underneath the canopy of the live oak but the C. revoluta are flourishing there.

 

19 hours ago, Benjamin D. said:

Honestly C. revoluta is one of the most beautiful cycads, especially when local climate keeps CAS away, nothing beats that deep, shiny green. We’re lucky that’s the one that went to mass market. 

Sometimes a plant is common for all the right reasons. C. revoluta is a great cycad.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, GeneAZ said:

Quite a bit of latifrons in that one, I dare say -- which helps any hybrid.

 

2 hours ago, Palm Tree Jim said:

Very nice Tracy!

Thanks Jim.  Gene, would you believe if I said I bought it as a non-hybrid, just a straight Encephalartos latifrons?  I guess I will find out someday when it cones if its the real thing, but I love it either way. 

20211223-BH3I6296.jpg

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Benjamin D. said:

Honestly C. revoluta is one of the most beautiful cycads, especially when local climate keeps CAS away, nothing beats that deep, shiny green. We’re lucky that’s the one that went to mass market. 

Not to take anything away from Cycas revoluta, as I agree they are beautiful, but the reason they went to mass market was more driven by ease of reproduction and survivability.  If I could only grow one cycad I have a hard time saying I would be disappointed with any of them, whether a Cycas, Dioon, Ceratozamia, Encephalartos, Macrozamia, Lepidiozamia, Zamia or one of the single species genus.  That is only one person's opinion though and I respect that others may have only one or two favorites.

 

23 hours ago, Manalto said:

My favorite cycad is sago (yawn), because the other two (C. debaoensis and a hybrid) are doing nothing after two years. I'd guess that they are struggling in the root system underneath the canopy of the live oak but the C. revoluta are flourishing there.

I hope that your C debaoensis and the other hybrid pop this summer to add diversity to your plantings.  Perhaps you should try one or two of the other cool hardy Cycas species?

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, better late than never! Some spectacular specimens! I’ve been gifted a few cycads over the years, name tags are long gone and this thread has inspired me to find out just what they are.

Tim

  • Like 1

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Tracy said:

Perhaps you should try one or two of the other cool hardy Cycas species?

At this point it would feel like throwing good money after bad. Two years have produced one battered, undersized, cold-damaged leaf each, while both of the single C. revoluta have sent up gorgeous, robust flushes of foliage, and the young double sago I positioned as a specimen recently surprised me by becoming a triple. These were, of course, freebies.

On the other hand, I find cycads intriguing and seductive (albeit frustrating), so am open to suggestions. What would you recommend?

(Neglected to mention that performance of my three Zamia integrifolia has been - well, I believe "meh" is the technical term. And they're supposed to be native here.)

Edited by Manalto
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Manalto said:

On the other hand, I find cycads intriguing and seductive (albeit frustrating), so am open to suggestions. What would you recommend?

I recall hearing and/or reading that Cycas guizhouensis was one of the more cold hardy and perhaps some of it's hybrids. TexasColdHardyPalms   was doing a lot of testing of cold hardiness of cycads and relatively active on this forum for a while but I haven't seen any activity from him recently.  He probably would have some suggestions.  Someone in some post mentioned that a lot of nursery folk in Texas got hit pretty hard by the big Texas freeze which corresponds to when he stopped posting.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Tracy said:

I recall hearing and/or reading that Cycas guizhouensis was one of the more cold hardy and perhaps some of its hybrids. TexasColdHardyPalms ...

My poorly-performing cycads, C. debaoensis and the hybrid (C. tataguiensis + ? - it may even be C. guizhouensis) were from TCHP. He (I think his name is Joseph) was generous with his advice and recommendations. My Catholic upbringing compells me to suspect the failure is mine. Maybe I should stick with zinnias and coleus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/29/2020 at 10:35 PM, DippyD said:

This will be an interesting one to watch grow. F2 E. Natensis x Woodii x Woodii.

73AC9BE9-6CF2-44B9-BF04-B407E0564BEF.jpeg

What is this looking like a couple of years later?  Has it flushed yet this season for you, as I'm aware that with a little more heat further inland, that Encephalartos are popping flushes in Southern California.  This is going to be a really fun specimen to watch with the f2 blood so to speak.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Manalto said:

My poorly-performing cycads, C. debaoensis and the hybrid (C. tataguiensis + ? - it may even be C. guizhouensis) were from TCHP. He (I think his name is Joseph) was generous with his advice and recommendations. My Catholic upbringing compells me to suspect the failure is mine. Maybe I should stick with zinnias and coleus.

Ahhh.... guilt has no place in growing plants.  Yes, it is Joseph, I couldn't think of it.  I can understand the Cycas debaoensis wanting a little more heat, as I've watched 3 grow in my gardens over the years and the fastest growing one gets the most heat.  Cycas taitungensis I'm a little surprised about struggling, but my knowledge about it is more in the appearance differences from C revoluta as opposed to temperature ranges they prefer.  C taitungensis being more stretched in the same sunlight as C revoluta, but in many ways quite similar in appearance.

So the last thought or question is whether the hybrid was smaller when planted than your C revolutas?  The cold tolerance increasing some for larger plants versus smaller.  I don't want to detract from the Zinnias and Coleus which are beautiful in their own rights but I think a nice C guizhouensis mixed in with them would be even more spectacular than they would be alone.

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, Tracy…….is there a Cycad reference you could recommend or an online site that you use? Thanks.

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/13/2022 at 4:50 PM, Tracy said:

 

Thanks Jim.  Gene, would you believe if I said I bought it as a non-hybrid, just a straight Encephalartos latifrons?  I guess I will find out someday when it cones if its the real thing, but I love it either way. 

20211223-BH3I6296.jpg

Yes, I can believe it is latifrons.  It looks like the clone that Maurice Levin got in 10 years ago.  It is very nice indeed, just not too much sheen at this point.  Beautiful caudex that is strongly holding latifrons traits.  I hope it's in a prominent place, since you and everyone will be staring at it over the years as it digs in and dominates with its beauty.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

luv E. lehmanii --- I got this one as a seedling form Cynthia Giddy in 1986---- always worried about frost so had cover which limited its growth 

Encephalartos lehmanii0.jpg

Encephalartos lehmanii001.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/13/2022 at 7:26 PM, realarch said:

Well, better late than never! Some spectacular specimens! I’ve been gifted a few cycads over the years, name tags are long gone and this thread has inspired me to find out just what they are.

Tim

Hi Tim,

I use the print copy of Loran Whitelock's book "The Cycads" a lot but depending on the genus have use a couple of websites too.  For Encephalartos:  http://www.africacycads.com/species.php?id=9

another useful tool is the Palm and Cycad Society of Australia's listing of cycads:   http://www.pacsoa.org.au/cycads/ .  Of course the best is getting feedback from other cycad growers.  If you post pictures of some of yours for id's, some of the items people will look for besides general structure of the plant are leaflet detail at the base of the rachis as well as further up, and of course if available photos of cones.  It can be tough even with all of those clues just because there are so many species within  most of the genra and the presence of hybrids.  Some, like the Encephalartos princeps below are pretty easy to id.  I'm waiting for a big flush on this as weather warms or maybe even it's first cone. 

If anyone else has a favorite reference website to share with Tim, please do.

20220329-BH3I7245.jpg

  • Like 3

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/14/2022 at 4:17 PM, Tracy said:

What is this looking like a couple of years later?  Has it flushed yet this season for you, as I'm aware that with a little more heat further inland, that Encephalartos are popping flushes in Southern California.  This is going to be a really fun specimen to watch with the f2 blood so to speak.

Hasn’t flushed this season yet but looks like it’s ready to blow any day! I’d imagine in the next week. Did a second flush last year late season so I’ll have to post some photos of it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here’s a few from today…. As i mentioned it’s about to blow any second!

CF4FC906-FDF5-4779-9B09-FBC9CA44E782.jpeg

8332AC24-B4BB-464F-8CC5-07CE1EDF3720.jpeg

79CBFFAD-69CC-442E-994D-65888CD5E3AA.jpeg

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Tracy, thanks for the info, I appreciate you taking the time to respond. 

First let me say, that the photos of specimens in this thread are off the charts spectacular. 

Looking around the garden, I have some of the usual suspects. Encephalartos whitelockii, Ceratozamia hildae, Lepidoamia peroffskyana, Cycas dabaoesis, some unidentified Zamia, and a few others. 

This Zamia is one of my favorites, especially the new flush. I’m not sure which one it is. 

Tim

103D4A92-AC8B-49BD-A018-87DE4415E802.jpeg

E6647552-B269-41DA-8F82-8AE3DC00D1B2.jpeg

A3AEAF9C-7695-4E8C-815F-4C694DD2CFFC.jpeg

692DBA5E-FD50-4895-A3FE-07B36ABE1F9A.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well i was right, didn’t even make it a week and i see a little flush occurring! I’ll post some updates as it goes through its stages 

FC1B6C9F-9230-46CF-B9D9-E5DFC712C6A4.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/17/2022 at 7:24 PM, realarch said:

E6647552-B269-41DA-8F82-8AE3DC00D1B2.jpeg

A3AEAF9C-7695-4E8C-815F-4C694DD2CFFC.jpeg

 

Looks like a Ceratozamia, possibly C mexicana.  I have one that is in the process of pushing the lovely bronze flush along with a cone right now.  These are a really lush looking, wonderful under-story planting.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, The Gerg said:

Favorite? Not sure. But I do enjoy this Encephalartos princeps x lehmanii hybrid.

Be a Hero.... collect both of the pure species to go along with this one so you can point out the differences between the three.  Both are great species, so I'm sure you will continue to enjoy this hybrid as it grows.  This is the point that it should start to accelerate with larger flushes (larger in leaf count).  As things warm, expect a flush.  You are probably more in sync with my timing on Encephalartos which is later than our friends further inland that have already seen flushes start popping due to higher heat.

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tim your flush could be Z roezlii .

Tracey ..just been told [again] my deb is not the real deal .. it is a male and gets some full sun . 

Been in that spot for several years , red volcanic soil .

Current favourite is this Cycas micholitzii .. has a massive 4m tall flush of 2 leaves.

micho-4m.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Michael in palm paradise,

Tully, wet tropics in Australia, over 4 meters of rain every year.

Home of the Golden Gumboot, its over 8m high , our record annual rainfall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Tracy said:

Be a Hero.... collect both of the pure species to go along with this one so you can point out the differences between the three. 

Here’s my lehmanii. (Not a great pic). I have a tiny little single leaf princeps as well that I’m not sure is going to make it.

EA145C78-6605-4F21-8389-91B93ADFA4F3.thumb.jpeg.c8b8f5e44694e38540c99d09d13dc333.jpeg
 

2 hours ago, Tracy said:

You are probably more in sync with my timing on Encephalartos which is later than our friends further inland that have already seen flushes start popping due to higher heat.

Agreed. I do however have a few flushing right now. E. concinnus, Freddy G, & altensteinnii. Looks like my ituriensis is about to flush also. Maybe our recent heat wave sparked it.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, aussiearoids said:

Tim your flush could be Z roezlii .

Good call.  I saw the grooves on the flushing leaflets, but didn't really notice it on the hardened off green leaves.  As I looked at my flushing Ceratozamia mexicana, the leaflet shape doesn't match Tim's either.  The closest Ceratozamia leaflet that I could find (C latifolia) has a much more lax leaf that isn't as long as Tim's either (at least here in Southern California from what I have seen).  That grooving of the leaflets just isn't very common among Ceratozamias either (C euryphyllidia excepted).  Zamia roezlii is a very challenging grow here, in fact I don't know that I have seen any in Southern California....that's my excuse for ignorance on this species... or maybe it's just ignorance.

  • Like 1

33.0782 North -117.305 West  at 72 feet elevation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...