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Large palm tree plantings.


RJ

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How come in the Carolina's tall Sabal's aren't planted? The ones at the nursery are never much more then 12-15 ft tall. The ones that you would imagine have been in the ground for years don't ever seem to be much taller. These trees are pretty cheap for the size of them, yet you never see the tall 30'-35' ones like in FL? Is it the growing season? This is what I'm talking about:

 

 

 

sabal-palmetto-cabbage-palm-1000467401-1447958341.jpg

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Probably a transportation issue. You would need a very long truck to transport trees that size. There are some in downtown here like thst, that are very old. If you have ever seen them transported, they load them on the truck half standing up & pack them on.

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You get half the trees per load and once you get more than 14' trunk on a sabal palmetto you have to use something larger than a bobcat which 99% of the landscape companies use. So you are left using a large wheel loader or crane to move/install which is a deal breaker on almost every job. 

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OKay, from a logistics standpoint I understand the shorter trees, Thank you.

Are grown sabals that painfully slow growing? So much so that this is the reason we don't see the 35' sabals in the carolina's? Is it that our growing season comes to a halt in the winter unlike Florida? 

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99.9% of the trunking palmetto sold are dug from the wild, not grown comercially. They are very slow once they get to about 15' of trunk.  Those 35' palmettos are easily 75-100 year old trees in the wild. 

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54 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

99.9% of the trunking palmetto sold are dug from the wild, not grown comercially. They are very slow once they get to about 15' of trunk.  Those 35' palmettos are easily 75-100 year old trees in the wild. 

 

That is extremely sad digging from the wild a 75-100 year old tree. Just let it be and be happy with the journey of watching it grow tall. 

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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I'm told that, years ago, Mobile, Alabama sold off many of its native sabals. They're not particularly popular here; you can find them in front of car dealerships and sleazy motels. Go figure. I think they're magnificent.

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17 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

99.9% of the trunking palmetto sold are dug from the wild, not grown comercially. They are very slow once they get to about 15' of trunk.  Those 35' palmettos are easily 75-100 year old trees in the wild. 

Whoa! I would never have guessed. I will certainly look at them in a differently now. Thank you! 

 

 

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