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mdsonofthesouth
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Ok so I have bough all my palms from HD. The chamerops humilis that overwintered in my z7a was hiding in a corner looking pretty sad looking but bounced back and is thriving after a late august early september planting and semi harsh winter temps. The 7 trachycarpus I have are also doing very well after being planted in mid March, with some looking almost 3 times larger than when planted with just light fertilizer and decent watering. My question is HD sells these palms in black containers with a 10F cold hardiness early in the year and later they switch to blue pits and change the cold hardiness to 65F. None of my palms are from blue pots, but how can they sell the same exact palms like that? Its both the trachycarpus and chamerops at all my local HD. Seems july was the time they switched to blue. 

 

Are the blue potted ones from a different source or is this some weirdness in their garden center? Im curious as the hardiness difference is very stark! Either way I fell positive about my palms and am sure most if not all will survive this upcoming winter :D

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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None of those palms will die of cold shock at 65F. Someone mislabeled that palm. HD's source(s) sometimes use blue pots to indicate cold hardier plants even down here but also black pots. I am skeptical of the info on labels on unfamiliar plants anyway. In any case, always use due diligence. My husband uses his smart phone to look up critical data right there in the garden center because plant info is so often wrong or incomplete. For example, down here many plants, i.e., hydrangeas, that grow well further north cannot survive long term here. The winters don't give them their requisite # of cold hours below 40F. If I see a plant is hardy down to -20F I know it won't survive except as an annual. Cold hardiness is very important but other factors such as heat stress, etc. are also vital. If the item is a palm, you can always come here.

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Meg has some good advice.  Don't depend on the big box stores for any helpful information about palms - they are only salespeople for the most part and if you're lucky enough to find someone there with plant knowledge (and some stores have some good ones) their knowledge usually does not include palms.  Their best advice is usually "just keep your receipt".  I lost a few palms when I first began growing palms due to naively following their poor advice.  Fortunately I kept my receipt!  :D  My experience in Texas is that they usually sell 3 or 4 species of palms that will succeed in that USDA zone and at least another 2 species that are not zone-appropriate and will survive only an unusually warm winter or with heavy protection.  I don't know if they follow this practice in colder climates since there isn't as much demand for palms in those areas.

Jon

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Jon Sunder

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On 8/24/2017, 8:51:04, PalmatierMeg said:

None of those palms will die of cold shock at 65F. Someone mislabeled that palm. HD's source(s) sometimes use blue pots to indicate cold hardier plants even down here but also black pots. I am skeptical of the info on labels on unfamiliar plants anyway. In any case, always use due diligence. My husband uses his smart phone to look up critical data right there in the garden center because plant info is so often wrong or incomplete. For example, down here many plants, i.e., hydrangeas, that grow well further north cannot survive long term here. The winters don't give them their requisite # of cold hours below 40F. If I see a plant is hardy down to -20F I know it won't survive except as an annual. Cold hardiness is very important but other factors such as heat stress, etc. are also vital. If the item is a palm, you can always come here.

 

My option for leaving here is not available at this time. Yeah Im not in the least bit worried about the palms I planted here in Maryland. Im just curious as to how they market the palms at the proper temp of 10F, and then a few months later label them differently or even as inside plants. 

 

On 8/24/2017, 2:00:27, Fusca said:

Meg has some good advice.  Don't depend on the big box stores for any helpful information about palms - they are only salespeople for the most part and if you're lucky enough to find someone there with plant knowledge (and some stores have some good ones) their knowledge usually does not include palms.  Their best advice is usually "just keep your receipt".  I lost a few palms when I first began growing palms due to naively following their poor advice.  Fortunately I kept my receipt!  :D  My experience in Texas is that they usually sell 3 or 4 species of palms that will succeed in that USDA zone and at least another 2 species that are not zone-appropriate and will survive only an unusually warm winter or with heavy protection.  I don't know if they follow this practice in colder climates since there isn't as much demand for palms in those areas.

Jon

 

Yeah I kept all my receipts as the palms I bought had the right hardiness and were sold as outdoor plants. The blue are sold as indoor it seems. Dont know why as they are tuhe exact same palms. What I find funny is the most popular palms sold here are majesty, queen and king palms none of which can really survive long term unless we have a streak of warmer winters (has happened), yet we cannot source needle or sabal minor anywhere. Thankfully they sell chamerops humilis and trachycarpus fortunei for months and even a few clumps of livistona chinenses which I will be testing this winter after all the growth its given me (one frond makes elephant ears look small lol). But its weird that the bulletproof palms that require zero protection here cant be found here while marginal and even extreme zone pushing palms are readily sold. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth

LOWS 16/17 12F, 17/18 3F, 18/19 7F, 19/20 20F

Palms growing in my garden: Trachycarpus Fortunei, Chamaerops Humilis, Chamaerops Humilis var. Cerifera, Rhapidophyllum Hystrix, Sabal Palmetto 

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