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kinzyjr

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A mini-update due to an opportunistic find.  After Ian, a home owner cut up some curb concrete they had used to border their yard.  When I saw it, I made sure I snagged it and used it to make a bed for the 3 x Livistona chinensis gifted to me by @palmsOrl and the now-established Arenga englieri from the 2018 CFPACS Holiday meeting seeds.

Starting to dig the bed:

00_Begin.jpg.04701e68d946955c5f3d3dbc90533e85.jpg

This area was dead sand only 3 years ago.  The flesh and fruit from all of the seeds I cleaned were dumped in this area.  Soil looks very rich now:

01_DeadSandToSoil.jpg.e649810a530e41a437239750c44a0587.jpg

Concrete is placed and the Arenga at the far end was moved to form a triangle with the two palms at the end:

02_ConcreteBorderPlacement.jpg.2d3157944537ebc82ffa7dda358bda77.jpg

The border is now black.  Everyone could use another degree near the ground in the winter:

03_PaintedConcreteBorder.jpg.c9bca6286eca9f6e95a9e5a2ef9de5b1.jpg

Another change - placed an AmbientWeather in one of my old planters.  We'll see what kind of numbers I get with this station here:

04_AmbientWeather2902D.jpg.9f203f30322a508975055c9744967eea.jpg

Moved my potted Borassus to guard duty.  With the oak moved, the Ptychosperma macarthurii could use a bit more shade.

05_Borassus_GuardDuty.jpg.caa6a85b722c09d5c73a6c9fad688cbd.jpg

My trip to the 2021 Holiday CFPACS meeting netted me two coconuts of unknown lineage.  They hate pots, so I made them a triple planting with the Fiji Dwarf in front.

06_ThreeCocosCompany.jpg.72f949864e1b0c4b750f516c46051d74.jpg

Moved the plain Acoelorraphe wrightii near where the Azul is planted to clear space on the south border for a project planned later.

07_AcoelWrightii_X_2.jpg.1c872f1fd2628a301124496e45058111.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 1

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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@kinzyjr When the sun is shining against my black wall even 4ft away the temperature is 4-5f warmer than the rest of the garden and on really hot days even more. I'm sure that black border will definitely help, especially considering how much more sun Florida gets, and how much stronger it is. Here it only really works well in the summer months probably why the syagrus romanzoffianana grows fairly fast in the summer, whilst in the winter it only really gives off 1-2f. We don't get many full sun days in January and the sun is very weak at this latitude! Looks good.

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On 10/27/2022 at 8:28 PM, JohnAndSancho said:

As King of the Off Topic Replies

Might be bubba 🤔

  • Upvote 1

Lucas

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I like that border material, pretty cool find! Hey is your acoelorraphe wrightii slow as molasses? I sprouted some seeds last year and they are still just slowly pushing out strap leaves every couple of months. 

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3 hours ago, Foxpalms said:

@kinzyjr When the sun is shining against my black wall even 4ft away the temperature is 4-5f warmer than the rest of the garden and on really hot days even more. I'm sure that black border will definitely help, especially considering how much more sun Florida gets, and how much stronger it is. Here it only really works well in the summer months probably why the syagrus romanzoffianana grows fairly fast in the summer, whilst in the winter it only really gives off 1-2f. We don't get many full sun days in January and the sun is very weak at this latitude! Looks good.

I used to have a 900 sq. ft. patio and pool in that area, with the pavers pressed into 6 inches of concrete.  That used to keep the backyard really warm.  When I had to have that area demolished due to age, wear, and tear, I could tell a noticeable difference in the backyard in regard to susceptibility to radiational cooling.  As I run across concrete and stone pavers and borders, they get added to the landscape.  Most people see concrete, I see a heat battery. ;)

3 hours ago, Little Tex said:

Might be bubba 🤔

We all needs some comic relief once in a while LOL

10 minutes ago, D. Morrowii said:

I like that border material, pretty cool find! Hey is your acoelorraphe wrightii slow as molasses? I sprouted some seeds last year and they are still just slowly pushing out strap leaves every couple of months. 

Yes, Acoelorraphe wrightii is slow as all hades until it forms a rootball.  To give you an idea how slow, I collected the seed that produced that one before the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Like 3

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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3 hours ago, Little Tex said:

Might be bubba 🤔

Lololol it's a close competition. 

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Hi,

03_PaintedConcreteBorder.jpg.c9bca6286eca9f6e95a9e5a2ef9de5b1.jpg

this is going to be your tribute to Okinawa! If you can add one or two Satakentias later, it would make it perfect...😀

 

Lars

 

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  • 1 month later...

Allagoptera arenaria is flowering pretty young:

20221219_135956_Allagoptera_flower_upl.jpg.33a8206fc96b80106fecfdb738a98ade.jpg

  • Like 6

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 2 weeks later...

Got an early start on that New Year's resolution - by completing the @Merlyn workout:

Removed a bush - this is about a third of the bush.  The rest was chopped to pieces.

01_BushAndPieces.jpg.a51d1ed215f6ca82c57a2753bfbd180a.jpg

The hole it occupied.

00_EmptyHole.jpg.ef5eaf3d464b93d62c06502a4a268d11.jpg

  • Like 1

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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10 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

Got an early start on that New Year's resolution - by completing the @Merlyn workout:

I think it has real potential as a competitor to CrossFit.  Or maybe I could sucker some of them into coming over here and doing the new WOD: The Merlyn:

  • Two handed axe chop
  • Pinch bar pry and deadlift
  • 400m run down the street and back
  • Clean and jerk a chunk of stump
  • 50m trash can haul

I'd have my yard done in no time!  :P

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  • 1 month later...

Some spring time blooms to cheer everyone up after an "average" winter:

Avocados:

03_Avocado.jpg.427645959397ac0ae7967714fd287dd4.jpg

04_Avocado_close.jpg.b0892c869e782af812b5403af68bb973.jpg

Mangoes:

05_Mango.jpg.0cef589528f005cf17fbb33af96e64d7.jpg

Aloes:

06_Aloe.jpg.44c36ec15895af39d4de0db5b4b5435c.jpg

Adenium (Desert Rose):

10_DesertRose.jpg.994083b3c73a2f073cdbbfc19636d893.jpg

Date Palms:

00_Phoenix_dactylifera_female.jpg.556a7a7082356b63f533346a1de23ddc.jpg

01_Phoenix_dactylifera_sucker_male.jpg.56dc6b972fd762d98f7f228be9d8b244.jpg

02_Phoenix_dactylifera_male.jpg.ac34a04c69a59e545ed840092c14b3d9.jpg

Unsure on these bushes:

07_Thorns_east.jpg.1e582a2ebe86157b6e46f3a5250925da.jpg

08_Thorns_north.jpg.7a86d08e37ebdd7385aa1b5a37506646.jpg

Hawaiian Ti Fruit (late on the draw for the flowers) :

09_Hawaiian_Ti.jpg.ef1d3cd4d654ae4ff42c096aad9724f8.jpg

  • Like 6

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/28/2023 at 6:51 PM, D. Morrowii said:

Looking springy over there @kinzyjr!

Might as well add another one to the mix then... Ptychosperma macarthurii with flowers and immature fruit:

20230314_191255_Ptychosperma_macarthurii_flowers.jpg.d1057dd491e009fdff630ff47f5d7b11.jpg

  • Like 3

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 2 weeks later...

The garden has a lot of necessary edits underway, so probably no full update until Memorial Day after everything that needs moved is moved and decides whether it wants to stay in the gene pool or head to the mulch pile.  In the mean time:

One of my seed-grown Phoenix reclinata is flowering (male flowers) - approximately 4.5 years from seed to flower:

01_Phoenix_reclinata_male_flowers.jpg.8a7e62ccbc1fe7e530e461179d2fafdc.jpg

Some may remember this particular palm from it's germination photos on 08/16/2018:

02_20180816_215113_PhoenixReclinataXWhoKnows.jpg.9c592d888e6fe40076b3714bd4a64a8d.jpg

The Atlantic Tall/Jamaican Tall coconut on the south side of the house decided to begin shedding it's leaf bases.  They are piled up on the other side of the palm for easier viewing of the now clear portion of the trunk.

00_CoconutShedLeafBases.jpg.81e40958c6f1c1a31f52e47583457d17.jpg

Veitchia winin: This was bought at the 2023 CFPACS Spring Meeting yesterday as a $10 experiment palm.  If it goes, just mow over it.

03_Veitchia_winin.jpg.04c7450836cef769e55e31be6c3d3eaa.jpg

  • Like 3

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 2 months later...

Spring Update - Part I : After a long day of work, the front yard finally looks relatively presentable again.

Front drain area: This area needed some TLC.  The plan originally included a lighthouse, but that is on hold at the moment.

0000_FrontDrainArea.jpg.a298b6f6d7f1b0556afd14c93824a9f6.jpg

Jamaican Tall/Atlantic Tall Coconut Bed: The pathway was blocked by the Sea Grapes after Hurricane Ian.  Since winter was close by and the Sea Grapes tend to mitigate winter damage, they had to stay in tact.  Now that we're near rainy season, the pathway was cleared on the west Sea Grape and I fully hedged the one on the east side of the bed to allow more light in the area.  You can still see a touch of damage from Dec. 2022.

1002_JamaicanTallArea_2.jpg.34926c995dde557ce8e7972295c15b03.jpg

Multiple Views of the Front Yard (4 Photos): Since the front yard is composed of mostly bulletproof species for this location, maintenance in the front centered around moving a Bismarckia that may or may not survive, a small modification to the front bed, and a lot of weeding that still isn't 100% done.  In the last photo, you'll see a brown spot where I had to remove the second oak I planned on using to completely canopy the front yard.  Unfortunately, it bit the dust (perhaps from way to much tap water when it was establishing).

2000_FrontYardSouth.jpg.7bdc0c88257f70794edd0bd7680eb669.jpg

2001_FrontYardSouth_2.jpg.485bad16d9dbddac57e1cb8f8bb525b2.jpg

2002_FrontYardNorth.jpg.927afebccc6683c774b82220d893407b.jpg

2003_FrontYardNorth_2.jpg.38b084505dbae759a79c50dedcacd6d3.jpg

Crotons, Hawaiian Ti, and Sabal minor 'McCurtain': The oak really does the trick in regard to making everything happy with dappled light and no frost.

2004_FrontYardCrotonsTi.jpg.bf8bf835b8c17c2d5ff8ba381973249b.jpg

Phoenix roebelenii and Cycas revoluta: This was the first bed finished 13 years ago.  This year, the spent fronds were chopped up and used as mulch.

2006_PhoenixRoebelenii.jpg.fafda36759550e20d0c0d11c3f8d3a18.jpg

Sabal minor 'McCurtain': These are a little closer to forming mature leaflets than the ones under the oak, but they still prefer to be understory plants here.

2008_SabalMinorMcCurtain.jpg.9c36a680db9656fd5db2af694323636b.jpg

Sabal etonia 'Miamiensis': Bought as Sabal miamiensis when it the epithet was recognized, I'm hoping these start flowering soon.  For a little nostalgia, the second photo shows the Sabal etonia 'Miamiensis' and the Sabal minor 'McCurtain' when they were planted in the ground.

2009_SabalEtoniaMiamiensis.jpg.87e5d55f7ac0e5054a41a44cd6c9316a.jpg

2019_SabalEtoniaMiamiensisBaby.jpg.1dc2e83157898aedf2ad1f743ee9184c.jpg

Trachycarpus fortunei and Sabal minor 'Arkansas': Both have grown well since they were planted in the front bed.  The Trachycarpus is typically a tough grow in Central Florida, but this one doesn't seem bothered with half day dappled light in the summer and half day sun in the winter.

2010_TrachycarpusFortuneiSabalMinorArkansas.jpg.4e2c0d6974090728d4a8fe42367d4591.jpg

Encephalartos ferox: Love these, but miss having the Bismarckia here.

2011_EncephalartosFerox.jpg.ae42fc8f0cb9e0d221ec4d8eeb09aa02.jpg

Roystonea regia: One of the few large crownshaft palms I'll grow in the front.  This one was grown from seed.  They don't care for any added fertilizer here - just plant and forget.

2016_SeedGrownRoystonea.jpg.c76846937b06fbc7aec20c2f0297d4ec.jpg

Sugarcane: When this clump was first moved here, it languished for a while and then suddenly recovered and became an asset to the garden.

2017_SugarCane.jpg.9abc1edd5f0a5065e4c448364529bcce.jpg

Ponytail Palm: This one is on the other side of the border, but you can see it flowering way above the Podocarpus shrubs.

2013_PontailPalm_Flowering.jpg.9db68ed132a2abf828f27e630836e45d.jpg

Recent departures: We all deal with this.  Usually it's our winters that get us.  I expected a few latent fatalities, but so far, didn't have any related to cold.

  • Euterpe edulis 'Orange Crownshaft' - This one was doing OK until the hedges got trimmed.  It got hit with a few minutes of direct sun and that was enough.
  • Sabal mauritiformis (young) : There are a few spots in the garden that tend to send plants to the mulch pile.  Figured this would be worth a try, but it didn't make it.

The back will take a little more time.  There is now a huge pile of bulk yard waste that needs moved.

  • Like 8

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Spring Update - Part II : Started tying up some loose ends.  There's still a good bit to address as summer draws closer.  We'll stick to a few of the highlights and try to get everything again in the fall.

New Bed for Carpentaria acuminata and Archontophoenix purpurea: Since the Carpentaria have been here for a few years, they earned their bed built with retaining wall blocks.  The Archontophoenix is pushing a new spear, but it doesn't look all that great.  The two Carpentaria seemed to handle the last winter really well considering how long it was cold.

2007_NewBed_Archontophoenix_purpurea_BackNine.jpg.436b4466adf2d9c3566e16b06a9771d0.jpg

Coconuts: The coconuts in the ground are at various stages in their recovery from the extended cold in December.  The Green Malayan was taken out of its spot and is still not doing well.  It will be missed if it goes, but it is in a large pot now.

Maypan:

2034_Maypan_BackNine.jpg.9bc8dc3172fa7066ba3345b66a8feb4f.jpg

Panama Tall:

9000_PanamaTallCoconut_LongBed.jpg.c79885b70c2ca1c6f248975a8535dec7.jpg

Fiji Dwarf:

2027_Fiji_Dwarf_BackNine.jpg.907adf0ba175091b3c6724b240719fed.jpg

Green Malayan:

5001_Cocos_nucifera_GreenMalayan_Potted.jpg.f45d318031e28a42fc7d02364d81051f.jpg

Tropical Hardwoods: There have done really well.  The Delonix has gotten large from seed in a hurry.  It's well over 7 feet at this point.  The Gumbo Limbo was about knee high when I bought it, but it is over 7 feet high now as well.

Ficus aurea (2 photos):

0005_Ficus_aurea_LongBed.jpg.e37ae26573db69b34b95258edcb53aa2.jpg 2000_Ficus_aurea_BackNine.jpg.f5545aa397afc83bc97e3f0c01de8282.jpg

Delonix regia:

0004_Delonix_regia_LongBed.jpg.419c94b8e93b1efe6989f89e4d78ee84.jpg

Gumbo Limbo (Bursera simaruba):

0001_Bursera_simaruba_LongBed.jpg.5e33685977ae699b94b0d7a22b334ec0.jpg

A few favorites: Some of the best palms in the garden.

Beccariophoenix fenestralis:

2001_Beccariophoenix_fenestralis_BackNine.jpg.bb44a6d176b75d3f2ebd0dfc69b7ef9a.jpg

Beccariophoenix alfredii:

2004_Beccariophoenix_alfredii_BackNine.jpg.191bb4880853d5edf89db3f72087e8ef.jpg

Archontophoenix alexandrae:

2006_Archontophoenix_alexandrae_BackNine.jpg.d1bce34d21729247f9141a89c15c82af.jpg

Chambeyronia macrocarpa:

2015_Chambeyronia_macrocarpa_BackNine.jpg.d64ed85313d172e0a2b51149454e04b1.jpg

Howea forsteriana:

2016_Howea_forsteriana_BackNine.jpg.d80a007338879909427385c4979fd96a.jpg

Satakentia liukiuensis:

2017_Satakentia_liukiuensis_BackNine.jpg.4b916c3b1475b6bd70a561ab694d8e2e.jpg

Psuedophoenix sargentii:

2020_Pseudophoenix_sargentii_BackNine.jpg.04af200bd8b2dd3e53f16809fe550fa7.jpg

Veitchia arecina (3 photos)

2024_Veitchia_arecina_BackNine.jpg.9330330002a23b3d2f46ffb47471091e.jpg 2033_Veitchia_arecina_BackNine.jpg.1d49b32e2ae8760e39740b863b11af56.jpg

2025_Veitchia_arecina_BackNine.jpg.790ce754bf84cb338d6651a28420c5db.jpg

Veitchia joannis, Veitchia subdisticha, Carpoxylon macrospermum

2032_Veitchia_Carpoxylon_BackNine.jpg.9f92d2e9a7f0d51d5bf44467956f57a8.jpg

Acoelorraphe wrightii 'Azul' and Veitchia winin:

2026_Veitchia_winin_BackNine.jpg.da6f74a0a2e408dc05e904e99e5a4e5c.jpg

Phoenix reclinata (2 photos)

2028_Phoenix_reclinata_BackNine.jpg.924c0fab2ead2d8bc2866e37fdc81786.jpg

2030_Phoenix_reclinata_BackNine.jpg.f68998537b84f9d816a91a7cbcd76c08.jpg

Brahea edulis:

4001_Brahea_edulis_DryBed_3.jpg.eb8535d609cee39703e78cb1125d17fe.jpg

Washingtonia filifera (2 photos): The first one had some issues with water in the crown after that brief rain before the December Freeze.  The second photo is one of the Moapa Valley variant palms.  For some reason, it loves having nurse plants around and languishes if I take them away.

2029_Washingtonia_filifera_BackNine.jpg.b43cc6f92e2b373f3cc7456c9d9a064c.jpg  3000_Washingtonia_filifera_MoapaValley_DryBed.jpg.b5684d227a089c505937530dff9ba19e.jpg

Bismarckia nobilis - Will it survive?: This palm became very wobbly after Hurricane Ian.  Unfortunately, it did not correct after being staked for months.  After digging it up and deadlifting it out of the 2 foot by 2 foot  hole it was in, it was moved to the back and planted.  Initially, it got a 10% chance of survival.  It was wobbly and eating its own fronds to survive.  Now it is solid in the hole, not moving at all when I push on it.  The spears have moved about 2 inches.  Hope it makes it.

2031_Bismarckia_nobilis_BackNine.jpg.e922bea8a9d92b1af47fe92d175bdb14.jpg

Other notable mods:

  • The drain near the Adonidia merrillii in the back had to be modified to get more of the rain water out to the lawn.  Unfortunately, this required the removal of a small Thrinax radiata that is unlikely to recover.
  • The Cat Palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum) was moved from near the Sea Grapes to the far east end of the garden near the fence.
  •  

Hope to get the rest in some semblance of order shortly.

  • Like 8
  • Upvote 2

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Spring Update - Part III : A few up and coming stars.

Roystonea regia: None of these appeared to like the light sprinkling of SulPoMag this spring.  That didn't stop it from partially opening a new spear in one day.  This one was bought larger rather than grown from seed like the one in front.  The photo on the left is from Sunday with the spear closed.  The photo on the right is Memorial Day with the spear partially opened.

0000_Roystonea_regia_LongBed.jpg.3e78dd30dcb20cc4a1337985eb279b4d.jpg 0002_Roystonea_regia_LongBed.jpg.a07a2183b543ae2c8ffae8727c663821.jpg

Allagoptera arenaria and Ice Cream Banana: Both are in the photo on the left.  The photo on the right is a closer view of the Allagoptera arenaria.

0002_AllagopteraIceCream_LongBed.jpg.a5d0a897ca92eed4955f010fc2f07173.jpg  0003_Allagoptera_LongBed.jpg.e4397a5a217c5109a71e25143e377174.jpg

Ptychosperma macarthuri, Hyphaene coriacea, Sugarcane: The Ptychosperma looked a bit sickly the last year or so, but hopefully it will turn the corner this year.  The Hyphaene coriacea on the right is now producing small fans.  There is a small one on the left that rotted and somehow came back.  There was a leaf coming up through the weed screen that looked like it came from the roots of a long-thought dead Hyphaene thebaica.  If it manages to survive and establish, it should be easy to ID.

1000_PtychospermaHyphaene_MiddleBed.jpg.7769dc2e1dcbf5e7c97a816701432082.jpg

Licuala grandis: Couldn't have imagined this would take no damage this winter, but it did pretty well.

2014_Licuala_grandis_BackNine.jpg.357386529e428625f6235a8caf3f043b.jpg

Dictyosperma album 'conjugatum' - new planting 05/29/2023: This was grown from seed and seemed to be doing pretty well.  At this point, it probably needs the stone to protect against squirrels.

0004_Dictyosperma_album_conjugatum.jpg.921c8a1ad9334d5d578d16393f3aab62.jpg

Saribus rotundifolius: I sprouted a bunch of seeds from a local specimen and ended up losing mine.  Special thanks to @howfam on this one for bringing me a pair of these from the same batch back.  Hope this one gets as large as the parent.

2021_Saribus_rotundifolius_BackNine.jpg.1ac30a4885046d1d381f421e2307275e.jpg

Cryosophila warscewiczii : These require very little care.  Highly recommended for those with canopy that want a plant with near-zero maintenance.

2011_Cryosophila_warz_BackNine.jpg.28252298fa7e9b55d3b476c94f0fd54d.jpg

The Aloe Bed - Complemented by Sabal minor and Chrysalidocarpus decaryi seedlings: The aloe were gifts from two growers in SW FL.  The name change for some of the old Dypsis palms is my least favorite name change of all time.

4000_Sabal_minor_Aloe_DryBed_2.jpg.a64541aa9fb8e047b208544d399f1735.jpg

The Chrysalidocarpus Bed: Didn't it sound better when it was just called "The Dypsis Bed"?  It has two C. leptocheilos, a C. decaryi, C. lutescens, C. pembana, C. cabadae, C. prestoniana, and C. lanceolata.

6000_Dypsis_Bed.jpg.900dbdbbdc4d1103415212caa203e738.jpg

Thrinax radiata: This one demonstrates what happens when the sun angle changes and it gets direct light before it starts raining.  It's still healthy and pushing spears, so hope the cosmetics are better around Halloween.  The little one is more sheltered by the sea grapes and bananas in the back, so it didn't get burned.

7000_Thrinax_radiata_WrapAround.jpg.700046fbde384062e712f50bc5fc7d91.jpg

7004_Thrinax_radiata_WrapAround.jpg.dc3a803478a284683fc46db0055020c9.jpg

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana: Definitely loves shade...

2012_Archontophoenix_cunninghamiana_BackNine.jpg.6a966b43bc7705922e1395a1e49f18f1.jpg

Sabal maritima: The "Dry Bed" needed something that was a lot less picky than Washingtonia filifera to function as an anchor plant.  I think this will eventually do that if it can handle the very fast draining medium with slightly alkaline pH.

3001_Sabal_maritima_DryBed.jpg.327e1f2846ed1a38fa3b9bd2cf4ccb1e.jpg

The Okinawa Bed: @palmfriend The Livistona chinensis and Arenga engleri are doing OK, but I don't think Satakentia could handle the direct sun, oppressive heat, and fast drainage that this elevated sand-base bed offers.  If the canopy extends over this bed at some point, it might be possible to squeeze one in down near the end.

8001_Livistona_chinensis_Arenga_engleri_OldPatioArea.jpg.cb25a3bc12b1eececf726e6803642077.jpg

Adonidia merrillii and the Drain: The purpose of the drain was to get some of the moisture to lower elevation away from the lanai.  There is actually another hidden drain under the landscape fabric and mulch that takes some of the water down the bed laterally.  That's one of the reasons why the sea grapes in this bed are so large.

7003_Adonidia_merrillii_WrapAround.jpg.6db26701a35afcef82091da508ff2e65.jpg

Chamaerops humilis (Silver): The first palm I bought off of a PalmTalk user.  You can see the stone in the background that I'll be using as I modify and extend the drain above.

7002_Chamaerops_humilis_WrapAround.jpg.65fad5c780355741c0deef680728c152.jpg

Livistona decora and Copernicia alba: The decora is doing great, but I feel really bad for the Copernicia.  It got attacked by ants and mealy bugs really bad.  One of the few times I doused a plant with insecticide.  A potted Acrocomia may need the same for scale.  This has been the worst year for pests by a mile.  You can see the box for my new pole saw in the background. 

8000_Livistona_decora_Copernicia_alba_OldPatioArea.jpg.c2e295a79b73ebd86040d7916493edb1.jpg

Spindle Palm: Both my spindle and bottle are growing, but a little wobbly in the ground.  They may need to be relocated.

2023_Hyophorbe_Spindle_BackNine.jpg.dadc3cbce0f073dacd2f24ed9fd41483.jpg

Wodyetia bifurcata and company: These are offspring from a big box of seeds that were too much to handle.  I tossed them out in the back yard thinking the squirrels would enjoy them.  There were a lot that popped up, so they've been integrated into the landscape.  The companion fan palm baby in the second photo is Coccothrinax barbadensis.

2002_Wodyetia_bifurcata_BackNine.jpg.a414388070ce233eb8d1a10396c179b5.jpg 2003_Wodyetia_bifurcata_Coccothrinax_barbadensis_BackNine.jpg.fd9b3095a29b14df599c06e99c46eea2.jpg

Chambeyronia oliviformis: The soil in the background was from the drain rework.  There will be more on the way.

2005_Chambeyronia_oliviformis_BackNine.jpg.7c96b34006b2c9540222b67478dc69e5.jpg

Chamaedorea radicalis:

7001_Chamaedorea_radicalis_WrapAround.jpg.0b2d6844c7601f3c1c6e5fcc4cbc8483.jpg

 

Butia odorata:

0006_Butia_odorata_LongBed.jpg.209f1f3f97f7c657acd03bb8df79bf9a.jpg

Butia catarinensis:

2009_Butia_BackNine.jpg.3b5defed7b0021e338fd41fea55254fb.jpg

Syagrus romanzoffiana:

2008_Queen_BackNine.jpg.2db649326fb518ee9ac10619c857e99e.jpg

Maypan - better view: I wasn't happy that the photos yesterday, so I took this one with better lighting and a better view of the short trunk.  It got banged up a little this winter, but it is opening spears pretty quick now.

0003_Maypan.jpg.94b7e8a669bb54809b3c59863d7ec89a.jpg

While clearing some areas today, I found a bunch of Ptychosperma elegans babies still growing in their vault planting.  This particular spring update comes to a close.  Hope the growing season treats everyone well.  For those heading to the Joint Meeting next weekend, see you there.

  • Like 10

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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We should just call Chrysalidocarpus species Chrys. for short.  Easy to say chris instead too, and i dont think it has a palm name similar to confuse.  Im thinking i'll do that as i reffer to them here so the typing time can be saved lol.

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Looking good over there! Pretty cool that that L grandis did so well. What was your low over there 30? 
 

@flplantguyI’m still not even sure I’m pronouncing it right 🙂 

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11 hours ago, D. Morrowii said:

Looking good over there! Pretty cool that that L grandis did so well. What was your low over there 30?

@flplantguyI’m still not even sure I’m pronouncing it right 🙂 

Yes, two nights at 30F.  I was surprised the Licuala grandis handled it so well.  There are Licuala peltata 'sumawongii' and Licuala spinosa in town that had some burn vs. this more sensitive palm.  The Ptychosperma elegans seedlings you brought to the December 2021 meeting were untouched as well.  There was a sensor and a red liquid thermometer about 6 feet away and it definitely hit 30F on both.  I stayed up overnight both nights and went out periodically to check the red liquid thermometers vs. what I saw on the various sensors.

  • Like 2

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Interesting, I’m pretty sure sumawongii and spinosa are known as the sort of cold hardy Licualas? I have a theory though regarding seedlings and small palms planted out. What do you think about them being so close to the ground? The reason I think it may have something to do with it is I had a few very small Ptychosperma volunteering here and there that sailed through the winter looking nice and green the whole time. The tall one though, up at 18 feet did show signs of leaf burn and spotting.  Just a non scientific observation it could have been related to the wind beating it took from Ian and Nicole or something else entirely. I know the soil does hold at least a small amount of heat. I put a probe under one of the frost domes I put over my teddy bear and one outside. The one inside matched the outside one until the temp went below about 34-35 degrees. After that the temps started to separate. I think in the end the temp under the frost cloth stayed 1.5 to 2 degrees warmer than outside. 

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18 hours ago, D. Morrowii said:

Interesting, I’m pretty sure sumawongii and spinosa are known as the sort of cold hardy Licualas? I have a theory though regarding seedlings and small palms planted out. What do you think about them being so close to the ground? The reason I think it may have something to do with it is I had a few very small Ptychosperma volunteering here and there that sailed through the winter looking nice and green the whole time. The tall one though, up at 18 feet did show signs of leaf burn and spotting.  Just a non scientific observation it could have been related to the wind beating it took from Ian and Nicole or something else entirely. I know the soil does hold at least a small amount of heat. I put a probe under one of the frost domes I put over my teddy bear and one outside. The one inside matched the outside one until the temp went below about 34-35 degrees. After that the temps started to separate. I think in the end the temp under the frost cloth stayed 1.5 to 2 degrees warmer than outside. 

Your theory is verifiable.  When they are that close to the ground in dense plantings, they tend to shelter each other and take advantage of the warmer ground temperature.  You've been here so you've seen the ferns that grow wild all over the parts of the yard that are not in full sun.  There are a lot of ferns in the area where the small Ptychosperma elegans, both the ones you brought to the auction and the ones from local sources, are staking their claim.  The tall one downtown didn't even get a brown spot on its leaflets, surprisingly.

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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On 5/29/2023 at 9:25 PM, kinzyjr said:

Butia catarinensis:

2009_Butia_BackNine.jpg.3b5defed7b0021e338fd41fea55254fb.jpg

Lax leaflets?

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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16 hours ago, Rivera said:

Lax leaflets?

Potentially incorrect?  What's your take on it? 

The parent:

20230601_Butia.jpg.4713440f116569e9bbe974f5c961b5be.jpg

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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1 hour ago, kinzyjr said:

Potentially incorrect?  What's your take on it? 

The parent:

20230601_Butia.jpg.4713440f116569e9bbe974f5c961b5be.jpg

Just different, and it will be unique if it retains this quality into maturity. Usually when I see "softer-structured," less keeled butia leaves, the leaflets have a more "ruffled" appearance but these don't.

Variability allows for interesting possibilities, and this one could be something kind of unusual and special in that regard. 👍

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Chris

San Francisco, CA 

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I was also surprised at how well a couple of Grandis did here.  I had them in pots in the nursery area, and they had no substantial damage around 28-30ish.  Sumawongii has done well in the upper 20s, but with more damage than Grandis.  However...the Sumawongii were out in the open in the ground, and didn't have the benefit of overhead canopy or heat from the house.  The one bigger Sumawongii under canopy had basically no damage in the upper 20s.

Most of my Licuala have been much hardier than I expected.  Grandis, Peltata v. Peltata, Ramsayi, Spinosa, Aurantiaca, Distans, Fordiana all did great in the nursery area and upper 20s.  Peltata v. Peltata, Spinosa, and Aurantiaca also did great in the yard, under partial canopy, with temps as low as 24-26F.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A little summer decor addition.  Love when it lights up at night:

0000_Lighthouse.jpg.55cce4fb24ce60f2128dc38d3c94c851.jpg

  • Like 6

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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4 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

A little summer decor addition.  Love when it lights up at night:

0000_Lighthouse.jpg.55cce4fb24ce60f2128dc38d3c94c851.jpg

That would look amazing with a pond next to it.

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On 5/29/2023 at 11:25 PM, kinzyjr said:

@palmfriend

Butia catarinensis:

2009_Butia_BackNine.jpg.3b5defed7b0021e338fd41fea55254fb.jpg

Nice palms Jeremy!  That Butia catarinensis looks nothing like the odorata that I have grown from seed.  I'll look forward to seeing what it looks like as it grows up.  Was it shade grown?

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Jon Sunder

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2 hours ago, Foxpalms said:

That would look amazing with a pond next to it.

The swimming pool used to be in this area until it got too out of repair to manage.  Maybe again one day...

2 hours ago, Fusca said:

Nice palms Jeremy!  That Butia catarinensis looks nothing like the odorata that I have grown from seed.  I'll look forward to seeing what it looks like as it grows up.  Was it shade grown?

Thank you!

That particular Butia has been a head-scratcher since I sprouted it.  The seeds were shaped exactly like the Butia catarinensis in the photo below (Credit to Nigel and Palmpedia).  I initially did label it as Butia odorata, but the seeds looked nothing like the seeds from the very attractive Butia odorata outside of City Hall.  My search for answers took me to the Palmpedia link above and the photo was the determining factor for my current ID.  When @Rivera asked about it it got me interested in looking a little further.  I did find a photo of the parent that has better clarity.  The photo was taken 10/30/2018 when I collected the fruit.  I looked for a photo of the seeds, but I apparently didn't take one after the harvest.

It gets roughly 4 hours of direct light in summer and about 6-8 in the winter since the oak often puts branches out over top of it.  The sun angle in the winter is low enough to stay under the branch all day. When it's nearly directly overhead this time of year, it tends to stay shaded until 4pm.

Seeds photo from Palmpedia:

202306172100_ButiaSeedsPalmpedia.jpg.4fc53516cde09b0dcc77232f68643390.jpg

Butia parent:

20181030_111837_Butia.jpg.efb8a1e789df626cc3e8f2d291710775.jpg

  • Like 5

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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That Butia looks really neat!  I have been thinking about finding some other Butia species, the regular Odorata is one of my favorites for color, sgape, and hardiness to not just frost but disease.  I just haven't fou d a good source for the other types yet.

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Happy longest day of the year/start of summer:

0000_Chambeyronia.jpg.20ab10501e12bbf9784fee4e9085cc2e.jpg

0001_DesertRose.jpg.b6a4c3b4271c4122da49e4b5624a354d.jpg

 

  • Like 4

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 2 months later...

Trying to get a bunch of weeding and reorganization done by fall.  This was one piece that had to get done first so I could use the curb concrete for another project:

Before:

image.jpeg.6d3df63d0692b15180f084aed23ee5aa.jpeg

After:

20230822_184022_ReplaceLivistonaArengaBorder.jpg.90779b4a149995f7929986ef8d5bff68.jpg

Hmmm.... now where did that black curb border go...?

  • Like 3

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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  • 1 month later...

Fall Update I

Let's start with the bad stuff.  Summer 2023 has sent a record number of plants to the mulch pile.

  • Euterpe edulis and Euterpe edulis 'Orange Crownshaft': These were doing alright for a while.  Then the neighbors trimmed the hedges.  After one day of direct sunlight, the outcome was never in question.
  • Archontophoenix purpurea: The tree crew dropped branches on at least five of my palms.  This one got smashed beyond help.
  • Medemia argun: All but one of these are now deceased.  The remaining living specimen is a two-leafer.
  • Nannorrhops ritchiana: One passed away and the other two are clinging to life.
  • Hyphaene thebaica: One of these came back above ground after it looked like it died.  A few weeks later, it collapsed again.
  • Serenoa repens: a seedling unfortunately bit the dust shortly before the tree crew would have done the job anyway.
  • Roystonea regia: I had two of these near the end of the driveway.  One has nearly started trunking, and the other never grew well.  The one that never took off died mid-summer as well as one of the palms in a triple planting I received as a gift.
  • Trachycarpus fortunei: The philodendrons shaded one out bad enough to kill it.
  • Bismarckia nobilis: It finally passed away a few days ago.  Not a surprise after I had to move it, but it will be missed.
  • Cocos nucifera 'Green Malayan': It hurt to lose it, but it hurt to watch it languish and decline after the root damage several years ago.  It finally gave up the ghost about 2 weeks ago.
  • Cocos nucifera 'Unknown': A very unhealthy coconut palm of unknown variety perished.  The roots didn't look very healthy when I planted it, so not surprising.
  • Howea forsteriana: One of the plants in the clump in the back perished mid-summer.
  • Phoenix theophrasti: This one was in the desert bed and spear pulled.
  • Acoelorraphe wrightii: A typical variety from here in Florida didn't survive a move.
  • Chamaedorea costaricana: a small, seed-grown specimen.  Unfortunately, it just never adjusted to being planted in the ground.
  • Potted Plants:
    • Livistona saribus: a few of these must have gotten too wet and rotted.
    • Jubaea chilensis: Not a surprise considering how poorly they handle Florida.
    • Washingtonia filifera: a lot of the seedlings I started damped off.
  • Watch List:
    • Veitchia arecina: In particular, the taller one in it's own circular bed.  This one hasn't been growing 100% right since late June.  The others around it are doing fine, but it wouldn't surprise me to lose this one with or without a nasty winter.
    • Ravenea rivularis: Out of the community pot, only two remain and they aren't doing so well.  Only half a mile away, there are 40-footers.  Go figure.
    • Jubaea chilensis: They never do well, so with the remainder hitting the ground, they'll be watched until they are mulched.  There was one that sprouted in one of the Veitchia beds that will probably not make it long term either.
    • Frankenbrahea: This was growing relatively well until a few weeks ago, but it may kick the bucket soon.
    • Washingtonia filifera 'Moapa': A few of these don't look all that great and may end up going away.

Now an update on some of the plants that have stayed in the gene pool:

Circular Bed (4 photos) : The circular bed looks as good as ever.  None of the plants seemed to be bothered by the long hot and dry spells this summer.  The Sabal minor McCurtain in the third photo is growing well, but slowly.  The cordylines are flowering now and should have seeds later this year.

0000_CircularBed_00.jpg.f26a3d6f561c2a06d045b54811d1e78a.jpg

0001_CircularBed_01.jpg.f38919a62ad2a0ccf34979bb959778fd.jpg

0002_CircularBed_02_SabalMinorMcCurtain.jpg.5708bf5e1b6c9979f9cea2e8db9ecba1.jpg

0003_CircularBed_03_HawaiianTiFlowers.jpg.c062ded37702b63cc3d9ea8592f7f61d.jpg

Front Wraparound Garden (2 photos): In this garden, the Trachycarpus fortunei and Sabal minor 'Aurora' variety from Arkansas anchor the middle of the bed, while the Encephalartos ferox that replaced the wobbly Bismarckia has put out a new flush.

0004_FrontWrap_TrachycarpusSabalMinorAR.jpg.022b4c922b572d03b1441c7c60f89bbd.jpg

0005_FrontWrap_Encephalartos_ferox.jpg.745d734fd548d49b718db2c6b22a09e1.jpg

New Bed: Earning their own bed this year after a battle with ants and mealy bugs are Livistona decora and Copernicia alba.  The Copernicia was nearly dead when I treated it with a systemic.

0006_New_Livistona_decora_Copernicia_alba.jpg.8783151db5867f58bbe0a7eb1031608d.jpg

Cocos nucifera 'Maypan': One of everyone's favorites when they visit due to the huge fronds.

0007_Maypan.jpg.0d213ac58c62442a40bd8cb3f5565049.jpg

Roystonea regia and Back South Border Garden: One of the Roystonea regia in a raised bed.

0008_Roystonea_regia_SouthBorderGarden.jpg.5ce3114d577ffca77f24ff01ae4674a3.jpg

South Sidewalk Bed: The Atlantic Tall/Jamaican Tall in a reworked bed.  For @Sandy Loam: in the second photo, you can see that podocarpus stay full to the bottom if grown under good conditions.

0009_Cocos_nucifera_AtlanticTall_SouthSidewalkGarden.jpg.ec8cc85f450fbc515d19ff561d8c4825.jpg

0010_Podocarpus_SouthSidewalkGarden.jpg.90b1f29002ff7e3409a8ca0fa6bf8dc7.jpg

Alright, time to eat.

0011_Avocado.jpg.b1f180de16a9211aab84e997e5da7d2b.jpg

  • Like 8

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Winners and losers, its part of the deal I guess. Still stings when it comes to certain ones though. Great colors in the circular bed and those Coconuts are getting big!

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Fall Update II

Archontophoenix sp. (3 photos): With the loss of the purpurea, the alexandrae and cunninghamiana are the two species present.  The alexandrae still looks like it's made of plastic in photo #1.  The cunninhamiana plantings are doing well enough that I made a bed for the one on the back in photo #2.  The one against the fence from @SubTropicRay looks great in photo #3.

0047_Archontophoenix_alexandrae.jpg.e0dcb947c7bb25cf030a2518d5bed857.jpg

0048_Archontophoenix_cunninghamiana.jpg.3925d7b27c7bb5fbc16e5129af667d65.jpg

0049_Archontophoenix_cunninghamiana.jpg.1cf2a92d6d7feaaafef4491be3f8035b.jpg

Proud parents (2 photos): For those who received Phoenix reclinata hybrid seeds from me, these are the parents.  The first photo is the mother.

0005_Phoenix_reclinata.jpg.00c75ea2a198382ec0c7843eac7d1a39.jpg

0006_Phoenix_reclinata.jpg.143952c21fbe1ff9011e32001e864ae4.jpg

Veitchia et. al (3 photos): The first photo shows the lighthouse with the Veitchia arecina that hasn't been doing so well.  The fan palm in the photo with the lighthouse is Brahea edulis.  The second photo is a Veitchia arecina that was very sick when I got it some time ago.  It had spear pulled and I adopted it and nursed it back to health.  The last photo shows a row of some of the most cold-sensitive plants in the yard, with Veitchia winin and a Fiji Dwarf coconut in this row.  The thought of turning this into one long bed crossed my mind, but a lot of this stuff might be in the mulch pile after this winter.  The Acoelorraphe wrightii 'Azul' and the remaining Roystonea regia from the community pot are in this photo as well.

0000_Lighthouse_Veitchia.jpg.e45a1bfb1cf57da60c3dddf275bd1384.jpg  0003_Veitchia_arecina.jpg.362c13525bfe3d92078b66b6f5bb3a1b.jpg

0004_Veitchia_arecina_winin_FijiDwarf_Roystonea_AcoelAzul.jpg.f8325a21f3fb929229d46ae481a0d449.jpg

Damaged Goods (3 photos): The two Carpentaria acuminata were damaged by the tree crew.  They look as if they'll recover provided they survive the winter.  The Pseudophoenix sargentii was damaged as well.  Something skinned up the spear, so that was probably a near-kill due to negligence.

0021_Carpentaria_acuminata.jpg.f29ae5c2b348a2e333b77b5bb6b12ae4.jpg  0022_Carpentaria_acuminata.jpg.65e7409a56b5bd4159a8d9cb9aeb01f5.jpg

0019_Pseudophoenix_sargentii.jpg.e980368a6264987a1e982ba1ce156dba.jpg

Chambeyronias (3 photos):  Chambeyronia macrocarpa, Chambeyronia (Kentiopsis) oliviformis, and Chambeyronia macrocarpa 'Houailou', respectively.

0017_Chambeyronia_macrocarpa.jpg.cf1483eb83c6a8aeaf013eac5b8b20bb.jpg

0025_Chambeyronia_oliviformis.jpg.1a6fc5561e239c13fc379baab3d19f20.jpg

0028_Chambeyronia_houilou.jpg.915e2e222fb922cffb98a690d7d1f919.jpg

The Odd Couple: Who would think Adonidia merrillii and Chamaerops humilis could share a bed happily?

0010_Adonidia_Chamaerops.jpg.cb39f43a94de6ba9bf88f2aa33775f9f.jpg

Beccariophoenix (2 photos): Beccariophoenix alfredii and Beccariophoenix fenestralis, respectively.  The sun damage on the fenestralis was a side effect of the tree crew visit.

0026_Beccariophoenix_alfredii.jpg.54569b40c480c0381fc56e56252c3ce0.jpg

0027_Beccariophoenix_fenestralis.jpg.d74dc22018c57a8220746d67aace6e35.jpg

Satakentia liukiuensis: no more description needed...

0018_Satakentia_liukiuensis.jpg.7d2bd41fff96d79bdfb805c041d45038.jpg

Ptychosperma macarthurii: no more description needed...

0029_Ptychosperma_macarthurii.jpg.3e9729e4265642e7a2bfbdd8592c9ee2.jpg

Cryosophila warscewiczii: no more description needed...

0050_Cryosophila_warzewiczii.jpg.66c282a46a32a87f5a90b1fe9f214625.jpg

Syagrus, Butia, Washingtonia: These are in order.  It's hard to tell from the photo, but the Washingtonia planting hole is sloped at ~30 degrees.

0008_Syagrus_Butia.jpg.dbc130326e4c416e735e2f3758960d38.jpg

0007_Washingtonia.jpg.b5c0d61ea631ee1a9a860ad848173e5a.jpg

Still don't know where that curb concrete got to....

To be continued...

  • Like 9

Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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Uh oh...Photo #3 looks like a Ptychosperma.  

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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The Butia catarinensis looks like it could be a Roystonea to me... Any chance of a seed mixup?

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Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

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8 hours ago, SubTropicRay said:

Uh oh...Photo #3 looks like a Ptychosperma. 

Took a look at it this afternoon and the leaf tips do look a lot closer to the Ptychosperma macarthurii than they do the Archontophoenix cunninghamiana.  Do you have any thoughts as to what species this might be?

7 hours ago, Zeeth said:

The Butia catarinensis looks like it could be a Roystonea to me... Any chance of a seed mixup?

My seed growing operation had a lot of fail-safes built in, but it appears to me that you are right.  I took a real close look at it today, and the brown spots on what will soon be a crownshaft jumped out to me.  The only seed batch of Roystonea regia I sprouted was from the October 2018 meeting in Hastings, FL.  If memory serves correct, @Steve the palmreader brought those seeds and some Thrinax radiata seeds as well.  This one must have snuck into a pot where it did not belong.  From the posts above discussing this palm, the seed batches would have been sowed within a few weeks of each other. @Foxpalms + @Merlyn + @Rivera I think Zeeth solved the mystery as to why this didn't look like a Butia.

It's a bit too close to the house for my liking, so a move is probably in its future.  This is a photo of the brown spots.

0000_Butia_Rename_Roystonea.jpg.3f23d9568d2b450065aa1a147ba78b09.jpg

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Lakeland, FL

USDA Zone 1990: 9a  2012: 9b  2023: 10a | Sunset Zone: 26 | Record Low: 20F/-6.67C (Jan. 1985, Dec.1962) | Record Low USDA Zone: 9a

30-Year Avg. Low: 30F | 30-year Min: 24F

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