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Butia palms


Laaz

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I'm going to start this tonight & walk the neighborhood tomorrow & get some shots of the different butia varieties in my neighborhood alone. There are literally millions of butia palms here in the Charleston area, my neighborhood alone probably has a thousand or more. I'll use my good camera tomorrow to documents the neighborhood butia's. If you are sure of a named butia, please post...

 

Butia Strictor.

 

2008dif.jpg

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Cool ... I've seen pics of B. var. Strictor with nearly no recurved fronds. Great genus of palms.

Cheers, Barrie.

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Went by the other double & no seeds once again. I've been watching this tree for over 10 years & have never seen it flower or set seeds.

 

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Edited by Laaz
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Wow ... no shortage of Butia in your neck of the woods. Great pics!

Cheers, Barrie.

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I don't think the double trunk is genetic, maybe a trauma or possible boron issues. there are some with 4 trunks out there

....so lucky to be able to go out and choose seeds from whatever variant of butia you like !!

Edited by Jamesasb
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Lots of Butias in coastal South Carolina! 

I planted this one at my grams house in Murrells Inlet (2hrs north of charleston) 

image.thumb.jpeg.4865085f4c2ccf08c2faff7

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Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Here's the differences in the seeds. My midget butia left, second if the giant butia, third is the normal blue butia & last is the double trunk butia...

 

149mjc5.jpg

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8 hours ago, Laaz said:

Double trunk butia seeds, maybe it's a mutation that will carry over to the seedlings.

 

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Has not worked for me. I have a couple double trunk.

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Beautiful photos. Do not want to step on your thread would you mind me showing Florida Butias?

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Nice Butia up there...I would imagine most are variants of odorata but the giant butia seeds look different. ...maybe something else?

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Wow, I thought no one had more Butias than us in North Florida, but you might. It's so interesting how many different forms there are. The same is true here, although many look alike--it seems like you have greater diversity. I wonder if there are different species in there (eriospatha, yatay, etc) or even hybrids between them. Some are much more attractive to my eye than others, especially when they hold more fronds.

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Woodville, FL

zone 8b

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Wow !  I had no idea they were planted that much..   that's interesting.  The robusta of the east !   

I cant tell Butia apart.. plus their forms and names are confusing to me.. Hard to know what your palm will look like when it gets larger if one plants one.  I have 2 in my garden and they look like different palms already.

The seed comparison is neat also... which lends to a different genetic for each form?

 

Thanks for sharing..

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Not readily available or well known up in British Columbia, but one guy about 75 miles from here did import a good selection of these. Mine's three years in now and this year seems pretty decent for growth. No where near the size of the ones Todd photographed and this one is Butia eriospatha  in my side yard area.

Cheers, Barrie.

 

 

Butia eriospatha.jpg

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Great documentation of a genus that doesn't get a lot of attention.

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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On 8/11/2016, 10:13:36, Laaz said:

Round one...

 

This is my midget 25 year old butia out front.

 

1z1wf4h.jpg

Are those tall thin plants Cordyline australis?

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I love this palm - great photos!  My favorites are the ones with the bluer leaves - I had to visit 4 different garden centers in Houston to find a bluish one.  I don't notice much differences in the leaves of the different species, but I too have noticed different sized seeds and different colored and shaped ripe fruit (yellow, yellow-orange, orange, and orange-red).  It's amazing how many you have just in your neighborhood! 

Jon

rsz_butia_capitata.jpg

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Jon Sunder

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