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Sabal miamiensis Seeds for sale


PalmatierMeg
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I just finished harvesting and cleaning this year's crop from my beautiful Sabal miamiensis.

This palm is/was native to a small area of the S FL east coast but is now believed extinct in the wild. I was given my palm by a local palm friend who germinated it from seeds collected by Christian Faulkner. Some sources now claim this species is only a variation of Sabal etonia. I am in the opposite camp. S. etonia is native to north central FL and separated from S.m. by 100s of miles. I have both species and my S.m. has thrived but my last remaining S.e., a year younger, struggles to survive in my alkaline sand. It is less than 24" tall and 36" wide and finally flowered this year. I can hold its entire output in the palm of my hand. I see no way these two palms are the same species.

Now is your chance to grow and preserve this rare species of Sabal.

50 seeds for $10.00

100 seeds for $15.00

Shipping in padded envelope: $3.00 in the U.S. (Except HI which specifically prohibits importation of Sabal seeds)

NOTE: I will ship up to 100 seeds to other countries for $10.00 shipping but am not responsible if your customs seizes them. I must declare contents of envelopes on a US Gov't website and cannot lie.

Payment via Paypal

PM me if you are interested

Photos

5664c3de8e47a_Sabalmiamiensis0112-6-15.t

5664c4d4b2f1b_Sabalmiamiensis017-10-15.t

5664c4f8a89a7_Sabalmiamiensis026-16-15.t

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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I think the story went something like, those that were thought of as miamiensis, later turned out to be palmetto. Last I was told is that it once did exist, but is now extinct.

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1 hour ago, Mandrew968 said:

I think the story went something like, those that were thought of as miamiensis, later turned out to be palmetto. Last I was told is that it once did exist, but is now extinct.

I have both S.m. and standard S. palmetto. None of my S. palmetto have flowered yet but I've seen plenty of seeds. Seeds of my S.m. are significantly larger than palmetto. I'm not convinced they are the same. What I heard/read is that S.m. is extinct in the wild - habitat destroyed in name of tourism. But a few examples existed in botanical gardens and private collections. My palm came from two knowledgeable sources.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Meg, I can't say for sure either way. I hope you have a real miamiensis. It sounds good from what you are presenting. I am sure you are with me and wish there was a final say and conjecture could be put to rest. All I was trying to say in my previous post was that the two palms (I thought) that were argued over speciation were palmetto and miamiensis, not etonia and miamiensis.

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4 hours ago, Mandrew968 said:

Meg, I can't say for sure either way. I hope you have a real miamiensis. It sounds good from what you are presenting. I am sure you are with me and wish there was a final say and conjecture could be put to rest. All I was trying to say in my previous post was that the two palms (I thought) that were argued over speciation were palmetto and miamiensis, not etonia and miamiensis.

Andrew, thanks for the clarification.  I know I read somewhere etonia was involved but I can't remember where, when or who wrote that. But that info must be bogus and I won't mention it again. Palmetto sounds like a more valid candidate. Perhaps DNA studies will settle the issue. My sources for this palm have more knowledge about palms than I have and I stand by them.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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I hope your correct.  I have 2 one gallon Supposedly Miamiensis species that I posted a few months ago and saw your post a while back.  Being I am in CA, it's even more than likely I have something else. But won't be able to tell  definitively till it gets to your size. Either way I'm sure it will be beautiful looking palm wich is all I care about.  Is the fun part of growing and planting. I'm not one who is gonna rip it out of grown just cause it's not what I thought it was or wasn't.  I don't have the room to have a bunch of Sabals, but I have Uresana and Blackberryana growing. And these as well. Keep us posted on your beautiful miamiensis ! 

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One thought has occurred to me regarding this palm. Its importance is not whether the clumpers or splitters are correct. Maybe DNA analysis will settle the squabble. Even if this species/cultivar turns out to be S. palmetto the fact remains that it was a distinct palm clinging to a small area in Broward & Dade counties. No one recognized its uniqueness and its habitat was destroyed, leaving only a few specimens in botanical gardens and private collections. For that reason alone it should be conserved.

Consider that Sabal minor has many cultivars: Louisiana, Blountstown Dwarf, McCurtain County, Emerald Island Giant, et. al. All are still S. minor but are collected and treasured by enthusiasts. If even one were to be lost, Sabal lovers would mourn. So, even if this palm is shown to be S. palmetto, it might be a now-extinct-in-the-wild cultivar: Sabal palmetto Miami and worthy of the respect shown S. minor cultivars.

When I compare seeds of this palm to those of Sabal palmetto Lisa, miamiensis seeds are 2-3 times as large. I recently read in Palmpedia that miamiensis has the largest seeds of any Sabal. What does that mean? Sabal minor has large seeds and is considered the most primitive Sabal (also the most diverse). So, could S. miamiensis  be a more primitive palm that gave rise to S. palmetto? And the small population of miamiensis that was destroyed a relict population of Sabal, just as Rhapidophyllum hystrix is a relict palm? I don't know. But I believe we need to dismiss the notion of it being "just another Sabal palmetto" with a snort of disappointment and disgust.

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Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Meg - I've already posted in your thread regarding this subject in the Discussing Palms area.

This is what I know about Sabal miamiensis. From its original description, it resembles Sabal etonia. It also has the largest seed of any of the Sabal species. The coastal habitat of Sabal miamiensis is well developed and its extinction is presumed in habitat. Is this a relic isolated form of S. etonia or is Meg's palm the real deal that was preserved in cultivation? Can't answer it with any certainty however it is possible that she could have the true Sabal miamiensis. Definitely worth taking a chance.

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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From the pics I've seen of her Sabal M & Etonia they look nothing alike and Etonia is just Eecking along.  I'm with you and believe you have a true Miamiensis that you should keep searching and bringing up for answers.  Awesome you have something unique like that. 

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Meg that palm there looks identical to its parent, it looks great! Nice wide, costapalmate leaves and about the same height. It is nice seeing that this generation is now producing offspring. I will get a picture of the parent plant soon. I should be in the SE Cape soon, I'll have to stop by and say hi! 

Christian Faulkner

Venice, Florida - South Sarasota County.

www.faulknerspalms.com

 

Μολὼν λάβε

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On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2015‎ ‎12‎:‎59‎:‎15‎, cfkingfish said:

Meg that palm there looks identical to its parent, it looks great! Nice wide, costapalmate leaves and about the same height. It is nice seeing that this generation is now producing offspring. I will get a picture of the parent plant soon. I should be in the SE Cape soon, I'll have to stop by and say hi! 

Please come by and I'll give you a  tour of my garden. I'd love to have a photo of the mother of my palm.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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On Wednesday, December 16, 2015 11:55:43, PalmatierMeg said:

One thought has occurred to me regarding this palm. Its importance is not whether the clumpers or splitters are correct. Maybe DNA analysis will settle the squabble. Even if this species/cultivar turns out to be S. palmetto the fact remains that it was a distinct palm clinging to a small area in Broward & Dade counties. No one recognized its uniqueness and its habitat was destroyed, leaving only a few specimens in botanical gardens and private collections. For that reason alone it should be conserved.

Consider that Sabal minor has many cultivars: Louisiana, Blountstown Dwarf, McCurtain County, Emerald Island Giant, et. al. All are still S. minor but are collected and treasured by enthusiasts. If even one were to be lost, Sabal lovers would mourn. So, even if this palm is shown to be S. palmetto, it might be a now-extinct-in-the-wild cultivar: Sabal palmetto Miami and worthy of the respect shown S. minor cultivars.

When I compare seeds of this palm to those of Sabal palmetto Lisa, miamiensis seeds are 2-3 times as large. I recently read in Palmpedia that miamiensis has the largest seeds of any Sabal. What does that mean? Sabal minor has large seeds and is considered the most primitive Sabal (also the most diverse). So, could S. miamiensis  be a more primitive palm that gave rise to S. palmetto? And the small population of miamiensis that was destroyed a relict population of Sabal, just as Rhapidophyllum hystrix is a relict palm? I don't know. But I believe we need to dismiss the notion of it being "just another Sabal palmetto" with a snort of disappointment and disgust.

 

Meg, I can tell you that I compared the seed you sold me last year to all the native seeds (Sabal palmetto, Sabal Etonia, and Sabal minor). Etonia are larger than everything but your miamiensis seeds. I truly believe it to be cultivar of Etonia and I don't see why anyone would consider it a regular Sabal palmetto besides the small trunk.

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

I have seen photos of palms claimed to be S. miamiensis, and they had strongly costapalmate leaves that were so narrowly v-shaped that the segments folded across each other, like hands closed in prayer.  I don't know if that's true of all S. miamiensis, though.  I have purchased seeds, which are now seedlings in the strap leaved stage, and they were large, but I didn't measure them.  Legend has it that this species was rescued from a construction site by one of the workers and is only known from cultivated specimens.  Scott Zona says in A Monograph of Sabal (1990) that:

"The taxonomic history of this species has been given elsewhere (Zona 1983, 1985). The presence of both dwarfed S. palmetto and S. etonia in south Florida undoubtedly has led to some confusion which in turn has contributed to the debate concerning the validity of this taxon.  Undoubtedly, S. miamiensis is more closely related to S. etonia than was  previously believed (Zona 1985).  Anatomically, S. miamiensis shares many features with S. etonia; although, S. etonia has more adaptations to arid environments. The morphological characteristics given previously (Zona 1985) are still useful in distinguishing the species, i.e., lax arching inflorescence with three orders of branching and large fruits and seeds. The fruits of S. miamiensis are 15.7-19.0 (16.9 + 1.1) mm in diameter, versus 9.0-15.4 (12.9 + 1.9) mm in S. etonia.  Habitat differences are critical."

Here's hoping my seeds and yours are genuine!

Got palms?

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On ‎1‎/‎4‎/‎2017‎ ‎3‎:‎50‎:‎41‎, gerardv said:

Meg. Do you have seeds for sale this season of S miamensis. Thanks 

I just harvested my mother palm's seeds but need to clean them. I will post them in the next week or so. Thanks for asking.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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  • 4 years later...

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