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W. filifera in Albuquerque


ChrisA
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I wish you luck Daniel! I'm jealous of the CIDP I see in photos from London, they don't stand a chance here even with my dry cold... 

What part of England are you located in? Which Washingtonia have you tried so far, and what do you plan to try?

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@Daniel There are a lot of factors that allow palms in the desert southwest to survive extremely low temperatures other than lack of humidity and precipitation.  Growing up two cloudy days in a row was a rarity in New Mexico and the winter solar radiation of West Texas, NM and AZ allows the trunks of the palms to actually warm despite single digit temperatures throughout the day. This last factor was brought to my attention by a fellow PalmTalker a few years ago, but makes perfect sense. I'd give them all the credit if I could remember whom it was. A few days ago even when we were in the 20's here in Dallas the trunk of my large butia and sabals were warm to the touch.

 

See the source image

World Solar Insolation Map

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6 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

@Daniel There are a lot of factors that allow palms in the desert southwest to survive extremely low temperatures other than lack of humidity and precipitation.  Growing up two cloudy days in a row was a rarity in New Mexico and the winter solar radiation of West Texas, NM and AZ allows the trunks of the palms to actually warm despite single digit temperatures throughout the day. This last factor was brought to my attention by a fellow PalmTalker a few years ago, but makes perfect sense. I'd give them all the credit if I could remember whom it was. A few days ago even when we were in the 20's here in Dallas the trunk of my large butia and sabals were warm to the touch.

 

See the source image

World Solar Insolation Map

Joseph, I think it was Jwitt who pointed this out. I learned from this that warming the trunk during subZero periods here is enough to make them survive easily. Even around here, with cool summertemps, filibustas grow a new crown after defoliation. I think washingtonia is the perfect and probably the only genus that can take this yearly.

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On 1/3/2018, 7:04:57, ChrisA said:

I wish you luck Daniel! I'm jealous of the CIDP I see in photos from London, they don't stand a chance here even with my dry cold... 

What part of England are you located in? Which Washingtonia have you tried so far, and what do you plan to try?

Thank you, Chris. 

I live near the South coast of England, so can have -6c as an occasional low most Winters. And frost is almost always coupled with high humidity. For example, tonight it is +3c but humidity is 99%. 

I have tried Robusta, Filibusta and Filifera at various times in the past, but will try them all again until I find one that is happy in my garden. A couple of miles away right on the coast, they grow very well and I wonder if it is the higher nighttime temperatures in the Summer or the higher Winter lows that are making the difference (or it could be both).

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  • 3 months later...

How did the washingtonia fare this winter? My filibusta is coming back nicely hete in Amsterdam, after complete defoliation. We had around -8,5C for a minimum but several below freezing days and snow 

E866FCC9-07ED-45E1-A95F-98FCD2B68A44.jpeg

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Hello Axel!

 

Your filibusters looks to be growing back at a quick rate!  It is amazing that they can defoliate completely and return. Your low was only a bit higher than mine for this past winter.  Here in Albuquerque we had extremely dry weather through fall and winter.  The dryness allowed the temps to plummet well below freezing nearly every night between early December and early February. The daytime highs made up for the extreme lows and allowed the palm to not take on too much damage. There were no days with highs below 40 degrees Farenheit. 

Here is the breakdown from my home weather station.  The high temps are skewed a bit higher than they should be due to the weather station not being shaded from the sun.

December 2017: Average High: 60.5F Average Low: 23.1F |  Highest Temp: 71 on 12/3  Lowest Temp: 16 on 12/8. | Precip: 0.0 inches

    Days With Highs:                           Nights With Lows:

     > 70:       1                                     > 40:        0

60 - 69:       16                                    30 - 39:   4

50 - 59:       11                                    20 - 29:  18

40 - 49:        2                                     < 20:       8

January 2018: Average High: 58.4F Average Low: 23.1F | Highest Temp: 71 on 1/31  Lowest Temp: 14 on 1/17 and 1/23 | Precip: 0.0 inches

  Days With Highs:                           Nights With Lows:

     > 70:       1                                     > 40:        1

60 - 69:        13                                  30 - 39:    3

50 - 59:       14                                    20 - 29:  20

40 - 49:        3                                     < 20:       7

February 2018: Average High: 64.3F Average Low: 30.5F | Highest Temp: 76 on 2/1 Lowest Temp: 17 on 2/26 | Precip: 0.2 inches

  Days With Highs:                           Nights With Lows:

     > 70:          7                                  > 40:       2 

60 - 69:          14                                 30 - 39:   15

50 - 59:         7                                  20 - 29:     10

40 - 49:           0                                  < 20:       1

 

Next to come is a photo taken on this cool and cloudy morning.

Cheers,

Chris

 

 

 

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Trunk view (flowering shrub next to the trunk is Texas Mountain Laurel “Silver Peso” Sophora secundiflora):

BA0D56C3-A673-44ED-A3FA-13DE8AF26E02.jpeg

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thanks Chris, I think the subfreezing days destroyed my fronds, your fronds look great.

I hope mine will turn out like yours. Mine has the same large fronds and long petioles like yours. 

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  • 6 months later...
On 12/15/2015, 12:41:21, jwitt said:

This is the mother plant in Cleburne.  

2013-12-27111705_zpsb0b05f02.JPG

I took a trip to visit this palm and its two siblings. They are no more.

 

1104180720.jpg

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On 18-4-2018 22:15:05, Axel Amsterdam said:

How did the washingtonia fare this winter? My filibusta is coming back nicely hete in Amsterdam, after complete defoliation. We had around -8,5C for a minimum but several below freezing days and snow 

E866FCC9-07ED-45E1-A95F-98FCD2B68A44.jpeg

update on my filibusta in amsterdam

2F4BF0EF-9A98-4EC4-B273-6B0971246DD6.jpeg

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11 hours ago, Advective said:

I took a trip to visit this palm and its two siblings. They are no more.

 

1104180720.jpg

I was just thinking I might do the same thing....bummer its gone, any word on on the Robusta at the hotel in Keene? Anyone know which hotel?

11 hours ago, Advective said:

I took a trip to visit this palm and its two siblings. They are no more.

 

1104180720.jpg

 

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WOW, your climate is totally different than mine. So much sunshine.

Though it is sunny this morning the humidity it at 90%. Winter is extremely humid in the PNW. Summer it can go down in the daytime like 50% then back up to 90% at night. Average humidity is 78% year round.  Palm can die here at much higher temps because of the high humidity. 

Great read. 

Edited by Palm crazy
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  • 6 months later...

Hello All,

 

Here is an update on this palm.  We had quite a cold winter here in Albuquerque.  Lows got down to 7F twice with 5-7 days in a row below freezing (1st week of January) which is very unusual. I lost almost all of the fronds but it is growing back strongly at this point.

 

All the other large Washingtonia that I know of in Albuquerque have also survived this cold winter. A large Mediterranean Fan was killed outright.

 

Happy Spring!

Chris

DFF4C1EA-C915-4C71-A92B-55F15191BC4E.jpeg

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That is really cool.  Is that a Robusta or a hybrid?  I have a Filifera growing here in southern Idaho as well as a couple Mediterranean fan palms, a Windmill, and a Robusta I just planted this year. 

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Hi! That is great you have them surviving in Idaho!  This one I believe is a filibusta.  It was sold to me as filifera from a Phoenix nursery but is certainly a hybrid due to the large thorns on the petiole and the red/maroon coloring at the stalks of the petiole.  

 

How are are you protecting your palms from the winter?

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18 minutes ago, ChrisA said:

Hi! That is great you have them surviving in Idaho!  This one I believe is a filibusta.  It was sold to me as filifera from a Phoenix nursery but is certainly a hybrid due to the large thorns on the petiole and the red/maroon coloring at the stalks of the petiole.  

 

How are are you protecting your palms from the winter?

This past winter all I used on my filifera and windmill were incandescent Christmas lights and the Mediterranean fan I covered it with a bucket on occasion especially in February  when we got most of the moisture this winter.  The windmill did fine other than some wet snow broke 5 of the fronds.  The filifera does get some damage on the fronds due to some of the moisture. This winter we got down to between 12-14 on a couple nights for our coldest temps and got a total of 5-6 inches of total snow for the winter but we got a lot of rain in February which killed off 1 of my agave and some of my cacti.  The Boise airport received 4 inches for the month of February  which is about 4 times the average. 

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On 5/14/2019 at 11:03 AM, ChrisA said:

Hello All,

 

Here is an update on this palm.  We had quite a cold winter here in Albuquerque.  Lows got down to 7F twice with 5-7 days in a row below freezing (1st week of January) which is very unusual. I lost almost all of the fronds but it is growing back strongly at this point.

 

All the other large Washingtonia that I know of in Albuquerque have also survived this cold winter. A large Mediterranean Fan was killed outright.

 

Happy Spring!

Chris

DFF4C1EA-C915-4C71-A92B-55F15191BC4E.jpeg

Looks great! By the time it is summer, I bet you could cut the dead fronds off and it would look like nothing happened to it.

PalmTreeDude

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I hope so PalmTreeDude!  I’ve been watering it like a banshee and also took a large limb off the California Sycamore that was looming overhead in order to allow more sunshine in!

I’ve already removed probably about 14 dead fronds from the winter but will do more once they push down a ways. I’m also planning on removing the old boots down the trunk so that I can wrap with heat tape for better protection next winter.

 

Where the hell is that global warming?? Lol!

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Yo Chris...  About the same here... everything is in recovery.. havent posted in a while been dealing with life lol..  but no time like the present.  Everything got so huge and then zapped.. but I know it was colder than normal winter.. but a good test.  Palms just looks crappy right now.. 

My BJx B burned about 40%.. these can take cold for sure...  my JXB... first time it was seriously damaged in the 6 years I have had it.. but 90% defoliation makes an ugly palm lol

The TorC filiferas got zapped but overall not as bad as one would think for as cold as it was..  14F last winter and it stayed green.. I think its leaf hardy to 10 to 12F  I got tons of seeds during a business trip.. so now I can grow more..  so amazing..

My bougainvilleas survived and are growing back quickly...  anyhow.. here are some pics of some palms...Preview attachment 20190516_205813.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey SailorBold,

Good to hear back from you. Hopefully things are continuing to recover after the winter. I'm amazed you got Bougainvillea to survive through the winter. Were they planted in the ground?  What's your technic?  I lost a potted Bougainvillea in my garage due to an extended drought (forgot to water).... I have a new one now that is looking good and would love to plant it in the ground and take reasonable steps to get it to survive the winter.  

None of the pics you linked posted, nor can I follow them to see what they're of.  The link just takes me to a gmail page.  

In order to hedge my bets against the affects of future deep cold in my yard, I've planted a Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa); I hear they are hardy to -50F! LOL

 

Please post some pics, I'd love to see how your palms are doing!

Best,

-Chris

 

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Actually the bougainvillea was easy.. didnt do anything! Lol.. Its southern exposure though.. with now afternoon shade from my filiferas.. they're about 4 foot tall now.. no blooms yet but growing well. Had them about 6 years now? Come back every year. I want to add a purple one.. I just planted them a foot away from south wall.. wait.. I did wall o water them the first year.. that was it. I say go for it.. mine grow to 15 feet every year now..but a pain to clean up after they freeze back..so keep that in mind. I'll get a pic in a couple days..  here are some pics from last year of my palms.. and also some randoms around town.. palms.. a fig tree etc..

20190606_095122.jpg

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Trachys are everywhere.. currently at a house I'm working at there are about 7 of them.. doing ok but still need more rainwater imo..

How is your mexicana doing? I'm looking to add one after you posted those zoo pics..

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@SailorBold, Nice pics..   Good to see you posting again, and to hear your Bougainvillea are doing well.:greenthumb: Whatever happened w/ your Aloinopsis X Psychedelic specimen? ..Think it was you who posted about it awhile back..

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Chris..

Any rate.. I got a real personal weather station.. I had a low of 8.6-9f..  Not sure how to add the widget though..

 

6 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

@SailorBold, Nice pics..   Good to see you posting again, and to hear your Bougainvillea are doing well.:greenthumb: Whatever happened w/ your Aloinopsis X Psychedelic specimen? ..Think it was you who posted about it awhile back..

They are doing well... cool plant... the 4 I have are great with our average rainfall..no added water.. 

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They cut the filifera down in Cleburne because they were getting into the power line.  I figured this was going to happen soon...

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I hope so PalmTreeDude!  I’ve been watering it like a banshee and also took a large limb off the California Sycamore that was looming overhead in order to allow more sunshine in!

I’ve already removed probably about 14 dead fronds from the winter but will do more once they push down a ways. I’m also planning on removing the old boots down the trunk so that I can wrap with heat tape for better protection next winter.

 

Where the hell is that global warming?? Lol!

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Sailor! OMG those photos are incredible!  That Red Bird of Paradise is huge.  I’ve seen them live here but never get taller than about 2 feet.  I’ve planted them in the past and never even got a bloom!

Hope your Butia recovers well.  I’m watering and fertilizing everything.  

My Sabal uresana is growing quite slowly.  The protection I gave it over the winter this past year was huge.  I had zero dieback but last year this palm struggled to grow.  I think I planted it way too shallowly. I’ll get some more photos together this werkend!

 

What about that Trichocereus!?!?  Have you seen the one on Griegos just east a bit from Rio Grande?

Here is a photo:

3F93D40C-A643-4AC6-BBA5-C5F95B0D075F.jpeg

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1 hour ago, ChrisA said:

Sailor! OMG those photos are incredible!  That Red Bird of Paradise is huge.  I’ve seen them live here but never get taller than about 2 feet.  I’ve planted them in the past and never even got a bloom!

Hope your Butia recovers well.  I’m watering and fertilizing everything.  

My Sabal uresana is growing quite slowly.  The protection I gave it over the winter this past year was huge.  I had zero dieback but last year this palm struggled to grow.  I think I planted it way too shallowly. I’ll get some more photos together this werkend!

 

What about that Trichocereus!?!?  Have you seen the one on Griegos just east a bit from Rio Grande?

Here is a photo:

3F93D40C-A643-4AC6-BBA5-C5F95B0D075F.jpeg

Very cool.. I have not.. other than these saguaros off of eubank.. I've seen an old trachy and a butia off Griegos and4th.. 

The tricho is doing well.. as is my tricho flying saucer. The red bird of paradise gets huge every year too.. I didnt fertilize it last year but the year before I did and it was 3-4 feet taller..

Do you have a mexicana? I thought you mentioned having one..

20180509_105245.jpg

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