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»Before & After« Pix of Potted Palms


Pal Meir

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Some pics of 12 palm species grown up in containers in Germany.

(1) Before & after 2 years:

Howea belmoreana 2011 & 2013

post-10467-0-84724800-1436535949_thumb.j post-10467-0-43883100-1436535965_thumb.j

Lytocaryum weddellianum 2013 & 2015

post-10467-0-12995000-1436535999_thumb.j post-10467-0-00845100-1436536013_thumb.j

(2a) Before & after 3 years:

Ptychosperma macarthurii 2003 & 2006

post-10467-0-17983300-1436536121_thumb.j post-10467-0-67663700-1436536138_thumb.j

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Wow, they all look nice! That Licuala grandis is incredible given your climate and indoor conditions. Do you keep it outside at all in summer or is that strictly indoors? Looks great.

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Wow, they all look nice! That Licuala grandis is incredible given your climate and indoor conditions. Do you keep it outside at all in summer or is that strictly indoors? Looks great.

It was all the time kept indoors under normal living room conditions; only for the photo I placed it into the garden.

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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(6) Here 3 further palm species,

before & after 3 years:

Cocos nucifera 1974 & 1977

post-10467-0-39095200-1436541742_thumb.j

Before & after 7 years:

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana 1982 & 1989

post-10467-0-08151200-1436541761_thumb.j post-10467-0-70404100-1436541771_thumb.j

Before & after 8 years:

Phoenix canariensis 1981 & 1989

post-10467-0-51944300-1436541798_thumb.j post-10467-0-20371500-1436541808_thumb.j

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Aww, sorry to hear that... What kind of soil did you use and how often did you water it? It looks like it was next to a window so it probably got plenty of light. For a potted plant, it looks great.

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WOW,

Congratulation for the beauty of these potted palms

It's much more difficult to grow them this way than in normal tropical conditions !

5809129ecff1c_P1010385copie3.JPG.15aa3f5

Philippe

 

Jungle Paradise in Sri Lanka

 

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Awesome!!

"it's not dead it's sleeping"

Santee ca, zone10a/9b

18 miles from the ocean

avg. winter 68/40.avg summer 88/64.records 113/25

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Aww, sorry to hear that... What kind of soil did you use and how often did you water it? It looks like it was next to a window so it probably got plenty of light. For a potted plant, it looks great.

I used a soil mixture similar to that I am using for Syagrus weddelliana, ca. 3/5 fine pine bark, 1/5 Seramis®, and 1/5 Kokohum®. A good drainage is important, so that the palm can be watered daily. But don’t let stand it in "wet feet" for a longer time. And the place has to be as sunny as possible, even here at 51.5°N avoiding direct sunlight during the summer months and about noon.

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Pal, those palms are some of the best indoor palms I've seen.

What kind of heating system do you have? How do you keep up the humidity im Winter?

I used to live in Ohio, a climate much like Deutschland, and forced-air heating made things dry as the desert in the winter. Many plants died, usually from drying up.

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Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Pal, those palms are some of the best indoor palms I've seen.

What kind of heating system do you have? How do you keep up the humidity im Winter?

I used to live in Ohio, a climate much like Deutschland, and forced-air heating made things dry as the desert in the winter. Many plants died, usually from drying up.

It is a normal central heating system for living rooms, nothing else. All my palms regular by them selves the humidity during the heating season, so that the air has almost the same humidity as during the non-heating seasons.

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Pal, those palms are some of the best indoor palms I've seen.

What kind of heating system do you have? How do you keep up the humidity im Winter?

I used to live in Ohio, a climate much like Deutschland, and forced-air heating made things dry as the desert in the winter. Many plants died, usually from drying up.

It is a normal central heating system for living rooms, nothing else. All my palms regular by them selves the humidity during the heating season, so that the air has almost the same humidity as during the non-heating seasons.

There are many kinds of central heating systems. (BS Man is a heating/AC person so maybe he'll chime in.)

Any thoughts on what your system is? That is a vital, critical issue to others in your situation.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Pal, those palms are some of the best indoor palms I've seen.

What kind of heating system do you have? How do you keep up the humidity im Winter?

I used to live in Ohio, a climate much like Deutschland, and forced-air heating made things dry as the desert in the winter. Many plants died, usually from drying up.

It is a normal central heating system for living rooms, nothing else. All my palms regular by them selves the humidity during the heating season, so that the air has almost the same humidity as during the non-heating seasons.

There are many kinds of central heating systems. (BS Man is a heating/AC person so maybe he'll chime in.)

Any thoughts on what your system is? That is a vital, critical issue to others in your situation.

In some rooms there were radiators as you can see on #1 (Howea 2011), in others underfloor heating as in #20 (Chamaedorea 2002). But the humidity was produced by a lot of palm trees in the living rooms.

My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Wow. Amazing. How do you do it so well? They look so perfect. I have so much trouble growing anything in containers, I almost killed 2 sago palms in containers...

Do you ever replace their soil? Do you keep them in small containers for a purpose? You said you water them daily...? What do you feed them? Sorry for all the questions, but this really interests me. I'd like to grow a few containerized palms, one I've always wanted in a nice container is the Phoenix Rupicola. By the way, it looks cool the way your rupicola's fronds twist so much. Looks like they do a 360° twist.

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Wow. Amazing. How do you do it so well? They look so perfect. I have so much trouble growing anything in containers, I almost killed 2 sago palms in containers...

Do you ever replace their soil? Do you keep them in small containers for a purpose? You said you water them daily...? What do you feed them? Sorry for all the questions, but this really interests me. I'd like to grow a few containerized palms, one I've always wanted in a nice container is the Phoenix Rupicola. By the way, it looks cool the way your rupicola's fronds twist so much. Looks like they do a 360° twist.

I treated most palms in a different way, according to the conditions in their natural habitats which I studied before. – You asked about Phoenix rupicola: The palm on the photos was grown up from seed in 1983 and was potted into the container (without hole) you see on the pic of 2002, that I filled with Seramis® without removing the old substrate. As you can see on the other photo the palm remained in the same container with the same substrate, which I kept always wet. As fertilizer I used liquid COMPO®. That's all. – But for other palms I mixed other substrates, some without any organic matter, others mostly with fine pine bark, etc.

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Another example for a soil mixture is this one I am using for Lytocaryum insigne (Syagrus insignis) seedlings and which I can recommend for palms which grow on light acidic rocks at hillsides or slopes, as it has an excellent drainage. The pots are 8x8x9cm, the plant is 1 year old:

post-10467-0-56573200-1436573519_thumb.j post-10467-0-21710000-1436573547_thumb.j post-10467-0-08435900-1436573653_thumb.j

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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I agree, amazing success, ( by no accident either), with potted specimens. They look fantastic.

Too bad about the Licuala, it was a beauty.

Tim

Tim

Hilo, Hawaii

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You got skills Pal!

Thanks for sharing your expertise with potted palm with us! Now I know how to "properly" choose soil for indoor growing. I had already pretty much given up on having some indoor palms after trying some kentias and miserably failing... but now I feel encouraged to try again. Thanks!

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awesome pic's

gotta love the after pictures best.

great job growing these palms!!

Carlsbad, California Zone 10 B on the hill (402 ft. elevation)

Sunset zone 24

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Pal, your pics show your "keenness" :greenthumb: , so are you using "grow lights" or a "heated" Hot house to get great growth with many of those palms since winters are so "freezing cold" @ 52 deg Nth of the Equator??

Keep Keen :)

Pete

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Pal, your pics show your "keenness" :greenthumb: , so are you using "grow lights" or a "heated" Hot house to get great growth with many of those palms since winters are so "freezing cold" @ 52 deg Nth of the Equator??

Keep Keen :)

Pete

After the seeds had germinated I don't use bottom heat (I did this only in arlier times, but it wasn’t good for the roots at all; pic 1) or a special greenhouse for the seedlings, but placed them on the floor of a living room (pic 2) or on a window sill (pics 3). When the winter (or even the summer) was too dark here, I placed some palms e.g. under a reading lamp (pics 4&5). Other palms like Chamaerops and Trachycarpus were all the year outdoors; only during heavy or long lasting freezes I put them into a greenhouse (pics 6&7). As I like to live together with palms I have them in my living room (as you can see also with the Phoenix rupicola (pic 8), that I had carried into the garden only for taking a better photo.

(1) Palmseedlings on window sill over heating in 1972

post-10467-0-09777500-1436613040_thumb.j

(2) Palmseedlings on floor of living room in 2003

post-10467-0-86919300-1436612875_thumb.j

(3) Palmseedlings on window sill in 2014

post-10467-0-15623500-1436612997_thumb.j

(4 & 5) Juvenile Lytocaryum weddellianum under halogen reading lamp in 2014 March & August

post-10467-0-33098900-1436613182_thumb.j post-10467-0-49186500-1436613199_thumb.j

(6 & 7) Greenhouse as shelter from freezes and storms

post-10467-0-30595700-1436613326_thumb.j post-10467-0-48286200-1436613344_thumb.j

(8) Living together in a living room, here with Phoenix rupicola in 2008

post-10467-0-59188600-1436613535_thumb.j

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Pal, your pics show your "keenness" :greenthumb: , so are you using "grow lights" or a "heated" Hot house to get great growth with many of those palms since winters are so "freezing cold" @ 52 deg Nth of the Equator??

Keep Keen :)

Pete

After the seeds had germinated I don't use bottom heat (I did this only in arlier times, but it wasn’t good for the roots at all; pic 1) or a special greenhouse for the seedlings, but placed them on the floor of a living room (pic 2) or on a window sill (pics 3). When the winter (or even the summer) was too dark here, I placed some palms e.g. under a reading lamp (pics 4&5). Other palms like Chamaerops and Trachycarpus were all the year outdoors; only during heavy or long lasting freezes I put them into a greenhouse (pics 6&7). As I like to live together with palms I have them in my living room (as you can see also with the Phoenix rupicola (pic 8), that I had carried into the garden only for taking a better photo.

Cool, thanks for the reply Pal, everything looks healthy n happy :greenthumb: Pal, in Oz a "green house" is a "shade house"( open and covered with 50% Shade cloth) and a "hot house" is a sealed outside rectangle x semi circle shape covered with clear plastic or 30 50 or 70% filtered, I haven't had an Oz hothouse for a few yrs now, time to build another 1 , palms go so darn fast in them. :)

Pete

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My living room is my greenhouse or "shade house", so I can grow up only such palms I can live together with :) , as you can see on these two before&after pics:

Before & after 1½ year Lytocaryum weddellianum "workplace" from February 2014 and July 2015 (today!)

post-10467-0-34906000-1436617626_thumb.j post-10467-0-02384600-1436617642_thumb.j

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My photos at flickr: flickr.com/photos/palmeir/albums

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Awesome Pal. I like your "workplace". I wonder how I can bring some palm trees inside my house without my wife going crazy on me? I should start small, maybe she wont notice them...

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