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Pindo Palm for Zone 7


Cosmo

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So I have one more slot in my pool landscape for a specimen planting. I have narrowed my choices to either a multi head Thompson yucca or a Pindo palm. Both are similiarly priced. I know the yucca will laugh at our winters but what about the Pindo. Yeah, verily I may live in zone 7 according to the USDA charts but we know that is always just a good story. As a lazy palm grower would I be better going with the yucca. There is so much conflicting info about hardiness I thought I would get some real world experience and expert opinions.

Thanks

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I say go for the Butia, you can always get the yucca another time. But butia palms are probably not a dime a dozen in your area so go for it. You’ll be glad you did and besides their cool to watch them grow year after year. Your still pretty far south so you have good warm ups even in winter so just protect when necessary and plant in a good location… Good luck! Pics would be nice what ever you get.

Edited by Palm crazy
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A big yucca comes with a much smaller root ball. Not an insignificant consideration when you closing in on 60. LOL This is the first year I actually noticed digging was harder and the same equipment that I was tossing around when I was younger got a lot heavier this year.

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For what it is worth, you might consider a hybrid like a J X B. Sure it is more expensive up front, but they grow faster and seem to be hardier.

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Butia will need protection in zone 7. If you don't want to protect it then I suggest The Yucca. Check out Yucca Recurvifolia. It's my favorite yucca with weeping leaves. Very Palm like.

Los Angeles, CA and Myrtle Beach, SC.

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For what it is worth, you might consider a hybrid like a J X B. Sure it is more expensive up front, but they grow faster and seem to be hardier.

My JxB has not been faster than my Butia, but admittedly it is like a race of turtles.

And in Zone 7, I'd go Yucca.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Butia will need protection in zone 7. If you don't want to protect it then I suggest The Yucca. Check out Yucca Recurvifolia. It's my favorite yucca with weeping leaves. Very Palm like.

You'd think in TX yuccas would be a dime a dozen. Couldn't be farther from the truth. Only one nursery in the DFW area carries a selection of them.

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Established Butia odorata can take down to about 15 for a few hours without much of an issue. If it gets down lower than that for several hours all bets are off and it may be the individual genetics of the the tree that may or may not carry you through. They are pretty darn tough once they get size. I have seen many that probably have seen single digits in their lifetime up in inland Alabama and Georgia so zone 7b would probably be very doable with a trunking genetically gifted specimen. They can take prolonged (48 plus hours) below freezing temps if the freeze is not severe.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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I have several large butia and several large Spanish daggers and a lot of smaller yuccas. I'm down in Fort Worth and the mature butiawent right through the 2011 winter without missing a beat.

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Yuccas are a fine choice.. attached is a pic of a house with a couple of nice ones around the corner from me. I think one is a Thompson.

They are planted all over here by the thousands.. I'd say they look somewhat tropical.. and get pretty tall. Fairly versatile and you can shave their trunks to look like palm trees. In the trade locally the taller growing varieties are called 'Palm Yucca'..

The only downside is that they grow slowly..... still large at any size- a bit dangerous too so that needs to be considered.

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wxBanner?bannertype=wu_clean2day_cond&pw

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It really depends on how long your freezes are. According to the USDA zones I would be in zone 7. No butia will ever survive here without heavy protection. However, many yuccas are good down to -20C or lower. Unlike butias (or most palms in general) they tolerate long periods of sub-freezing temperatures and the roots are almost equally hardy as the rest of the plant.

Even some desert yuccas are much more hardy than any palm, though some need a little rain cover. I grew my thompsoniana from seed in 2012 and it's just about starting to trunk. Never had any issues. Sorry, not the best picture.

DSC_0457_zpsshuijlbd.jpg

Also a nice yucca and indestructible: Yucca gloriosa (variegata)

DSC_0525_zps49vh0hjn.jpg

However, yuccas are not palms and if you're willing to protect your butia if necessary, go for it.

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