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Which Licuala do well in Southern California?


rprimbs

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I want to get a Licuala -- with big leaves -- but I want to get one that will do well here in Escondido, Southern California. What are some of the best choices?

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I can't necessarily speak for your area but up here in the Bay Area where I am, L.peltata 'sumawongii does very well as do L. spinosa and ramsayi. They all handle winter well. We don't have summer Santa Ana-like events up here and, if you get those types of hot dry winds, Licuala won't enjoy it and planting them in a wind sheltered position would be advisable.

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L. peltata 'sumawongii' L. ramsayi

Jim in Los Altos, CA  SF Bay Area 37.34N- 122.13W- 190' above sea level

zone 10a/9b

sunset zone 16

300+ palms, 90+ species in the ground

Las Palmas Design

Facebook Page

Las Palmas Design & Associates

Elegant Homes and Gardens

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I second peltata and ramsayi. Both are doing well in my yard. ramsayi also handles a fair amount of sun for me on the coast.

Encinitas, CA

Zone 10b

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Two of the best looking and hardiest as above, also spinosa.

Happy Gardening

Cheers,

Wal

Queensland, Australia.

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Licuala spinosa and radula (though new name I think?) do very well in California. Licuala spinosa is easily the hardiest of the Licualas.

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Ramsayi, and peltata grow for me, too. Ramsayi is head and shoulders the best grower.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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LICUALA RAMSAYI has been the best grower licuala distans has been a good grower also a little bit slower. It has only been in the ground through 2 winters but looks fantastic Licuala spinosa has been suuuper slow probably due to not enough sun.

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Although very new on the palm circuit, Licuala fordiana should handle long periods of cooler weather. Native to China, it's been so far a very easy palm to grow here in south Florida.

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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L fordiana is doing great for me. Actually better than any other Licuala I've grown here (L peltata, L ramsayi, Lanonia dasyantha included). It's only been in the ground through one winter though.

Matt

San Diego

0.6 Acres of a south facing, gently sloped dirt pile, soon to be impenetrable jungle

East of Mount Soledad, in the biggest cold sink in San Diego County.

Zone 10a (I hope), Sunset 24

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L. Spinosa will grow here, but it's slower than Congress with constipation. A one-gallon plant planted in 2008 was a 1-gallon 2012, and stepped on in 2013.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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