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Transporting rather big potted palm trees


David_Sweden

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We are moving, and my palms have to go for a 3 hour car ride to the new place. I wonder what tips you might have to get them there without damage.

The smaller ones I plan to take standing up, but two of them are about as tall as me and have to lie down. I think I'll wrap a plastic bag around the pot and tape it close to the soil surface so that the soil can't move about much, at least for the ones lying down.

And I think I will cover all of them with big plastic bags, to protect against bugs etc and keep the humidity high and eliminate cold drafts of wind, it may well be 10-15C (50-60F) outdoors. As long as it's only for a few hours I don't think I'll have to worry about fungus and bad air. I will avoid transparent bags for the ones that don't like direct sun. And water the soil the day before, so that the soil is more willing to stay put and the soil and leaves can evaporate humidity.

So far so good, unless you think I have some bad ideas? But there's one thing I haven't got a properly thought out solution for, and that is binding the fronds. I will have to do this for the two big ones (Rhopalostylis baueri and Kentia, about 5') and maybe a bit for the two semi-big ones (about 3', Licuala Ramsayi and Phoenix roebelenii). The Baueri is very easy to bind probably due to it's shape (rather straight petioles not spreading out much), but the worst will be the Kentia.

One thing I'm wondering about is if it is ok to bend the petioles forcefully inwards without limit? The Kentia's petioles are quite arc shaped naturally, and I'd be trying to bend them straight(er) for a few hours.

Another thing I'm wondering about is what to use for binding? I'm thinking some kind of wide, soft ribbon would be ideal to avoid damage but can't think of what that could be exactly.

The photos are from this summer, the Kentia has grown about 1 foot since then and the Ramsayi has 2 new fronds.

post-10152-0-46559600-1413268105_thumb.j post-10152-0-74020800-1413268149_thumb.j

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Yes - definitely put a plastic bag over the pot and close it up so you don't have soil all over your car if you need to lay them on their side. Other than that, they'll be fine. You can bend any frond as long as you don't actually break it.

They are not that large - you can probably fit them in a standard-size car - lay the front passenger seat back down and put the pot on the front seat with fronds toward the back of the car.

I would try to avoid transporting palms with an open truck. The wind will shred them even at slow speeds.

Edited by Pando
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I wad up lots of newspaper and stuff it into the top of the pot over the soil, then tape it in place with packing tape or duct tape over the top and sides of the pot. That keeps the soil in place.

Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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Seems the nurseries around here use the jute or brown twine or whatever you call it. I always keep a bunch in my truck.

I might suggest using shade cloth or blankets or sheets or something to wrap them in. I would worry about no air circulation but probably more about the plastic acting like a sail with no wind passing through and beating up your palms.

Half hitches work well to tie up the fronds

I'm sure there are folks with more experience like Ken Johnson. He moves big stuff all over Florida so maybe a PM asking his advice would be a good idea.

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Hi there!

Good tip on the newspapers I think, and with a plastic bag over the pot and then tape I should be able to keep the soil in place.

Yes they'll be inside my small car, they'll be outdoors only while going to and from the car.

Jute sounds good, what I can find is sacks (Santa style) which I can cut and also some laces but they look a bit thin. Perhaps I'll wrap them in the sack material and then wrap lace around it all.

Another idea I got for binding is cutting up a mosquito net. But jute is probably better.

What is a half hitch?

Will PM Ken.

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David, Kim's got the right idea about keeping the inside of your car clean.

Even if you break a leaf or two, they'll grow back.

Palms are tough. Just keep them out of the cold, which you might be getting in Sweden. (If not, lucky so far . . . )

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covering the leaves with a sheet or a bag of some kind is good advice. i have seen unprotected leaves that come in contact with car windows get burned by the cold or

hot glass depending on the season.

the "prince of snarkness."

 

still "warning-free."

 

san diego,california,left coast.

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I transport palms and other plants of all sizes,from tiny to bigger than what you describe,all the time with my car for a 3 hour drive to Pyrgos. Other than bagging the pot to prevent water leaks and soil getting out,I do nothing else special and they are fine, I don't tie leafs and don't wrap them in anything. If I am leaning them over to fit,I try to offer even support of both pot and the palm as they are not used to such angles and cannot necessarily support themselves,thus damage can occur without even support. You will find the leafs will fit better untied and spread around as the lower ones bend easier sideways than upwards and don't take up space when spread between/on the baggage. If it's too cold outside,don't let them touch the windows. Here I never have this problem and I have never seen sun burn inside the car(though the windows are with shading film and cut out UV).

''To try,is to risk failure.......To not try,is to guarantee it''

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Use a garbage bag or poly wrap the pots so they don't spill soil and (if needed but I wouldn't with those size) tie up the fronds together, then wrap in newpaper and stuff the newspaper in the top. Basically the same way as if you buy flowers from the florist which is the same way I ship my retail palms. Most palms are tough from what I have experienced.

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Yes, in your car it's all about keeping your interior clean from falling potting mix and not letting the leaves get scorched by sitting on hot glass, but with the air temps you're talking about I doubt they'd be effected. Now if you were towing these behind your car then you'd be looking at laying them on their side and putting a tarpaulin over the trailer etc.

Millbrook, "Kinjarling" Noongar word meaning "Place of Rain", Rainbow Coast, Western Australia 35S. Warm temperate. Csb Koeppen Climate classification. Cool nights all year round.

 

 

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I moved from the UK to Sweden in October 2002 and bought an old Ford Transit van especially for the purpose of shifting my prized possessions.

I took the ferry from Harwich to Esberg and then drove across Denmark and into Sweden via the Varberg ferry.

Needless to say, I didn't lose a single palm being as I had lagged them well with bubble wrap and kept them on the dry side for a week or two before moving. As you can imagine, I wasn't too bothered about a little soil spillage in an old van, however, I still put a bag around the pot and tied them at the top. For my bigger palms, I tied all the fronds together and bent them slightly to one side being as they were too tall to go in lengthwise and then tied them to the side of the van. Plants seem to have a tendency of rolling about in a vehicle, even when you think that they are quite secure.

Realistically though, as long as you take all the standard precautions, then a 3 hour trip shouldn't present your palms with any problems at all.

Nick C - Living it up in tropical 'Nam....

 

PHZ - 13

 

10°.57'N - 106°.50'E

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covering the leaves with a sheet or a bag of some kind is good advice. i have seen unprotected leaves that come in contact with car windows get burned by the cold or

hot glass depending on the season.

I brought home a 5 gallon Hedescepe in the car and left it in there for just an hour or two. Most of the leaves had been burned. It survived, but a day or two of that could have killed it.

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Thanks for all the advice, it will help for sure.

My car is small so I need to wrap the 2 big ones at least. I'm aiming at not damaging any leaves at all if possible.

I got this PM from Ken Johnson as well:

You palms are not big. Try not to use plastic to cover them it can get too hot. try to use cloth. gently fold up leaves, they can take a lot. just dont push on them once tied up. If it it real cold add another layer of cloth. Keep moist. Have fun!

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We are moving, and my palms have to go for a 3 hour car ride to the new place. I wonder what tips you might have to get them there without damage.

The smaller ones I plan to take standing up, but two of them are about as tall as me and have to lie down. I think I'll wrap a plastic bag around the pot and tape it close to the soil surface so that the soil can't move about much, at least for the ones lying down.

And I think I will cover all of them with big plastic bags, to protect against bugs etc and keep the humidity high and eliminate cold drafts of wind, it may well be 10-15C (50-60F) outdoors. As long as it's only for a few hours I don't think I'll have to worry about fungus and bad air. I will avoid transparent bags for the ones that don't like direct sun. And water the soil the day before, so that the soil is more willing to stay put and the soil and leaves can evaporate humidity.

So far so good, unless you think I have some bad ideas? But there's one thing I haven't got a properly thought out solution for, and that is binding the fronds. I will have to do this for the two big ones (Rhopalostylis baueri and Kentia, about 5') and maybe a bit for the two semi-big ones (about 3', Licuala Ramsayi and Phoenix roebelenii). The Baueri is very easy to bind probably due to it's shape (rather straight petioles not spreading out much), but the worst will be the Kentia.

One thing I'm wondering about is if it is ok to bend the petioles forcefully inwards without limit? The Kentia's petioles are quite arc shaped naturally, and I'd be trying to bend them straight(er) for a few hours.

Another thing I'm wondering about is what to use for binding? I'm thinking some kind of wide, soft ribbon would be ideal to avoid damage but can't think of what that could be exactly.

The photos are from this summer, the Kentia has grown about 1 foot since then and the Ramsayi has 2 new fronds.

attachicon.gifupl4.jpg attachicon.gifupl1.jpg

David, in the trade (florists) are plastic tubes in different sizes for sale that will do the job perfectly for you. You can buy the stuff by the meter and using them, you wont have to worry about anything anymore!

Succes,

Wim.

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