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Severe Thunderstorm in Spring Valley, CA


MattyB
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Like Ohio in 1993, that really hurts.

No one was prepared for it, either.

yike.

Pretty much an annual occurrence somewhere on the northern gulf coast. Some years multiple occurrences. Do that times 100 and you have an average gulf coast hurricane. Do that times a factor of a few thousand and you have hurricane's Camille Andrew, Isaac, Charlie. Do that times a factor of a few thousand and add 10 to 15 feet of water and you have a hurricanes Katrina, Betsy or Audry.

BUT, then again, we don't have earthquakes. At least we get a little notice, well except for those micro-burst, which can happen here any sunny summer afternoon. I lost a 50 foot Oak to one of those a decade back.

Also, I noted many of the trees that went over with the roots were very shallow rooted. I am guessing this was due to frequent irrigation and most of the roots being removed for development of parking lots, etc.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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A 10-minute storm with 50 mph winds caused quite a bit of havoc. Palms take that better than dicot trees. Still, those trees should have stood up to winds like that - assuming they aren't old, decrepit or full of rot. So, does SD ever get tornadoes? Or were those straight-line winds? What about a micro-burst? During Charley a micro-burst ripped the roof off a house on the next block, then blew through the east side vacant lot next to our house. We lost shingles and had a mahogany tree literally "unscrewed" out of the ground but were spared the worst.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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Actually, we do get that kind of thing up here in LA and the OC, especially in LA.

A couple of years ago, we had a powerful wind that blew down a lot of trees, especially ficus.

While such trees look sturdy to the casual observer, they are often shallow-rooted from having grown in lawns and overwatered locations in general. Those trees down in SD look a lot like the ones that fell a couple of years ago here.

Our problem is that we get the odd high wind now and again, as opposed to regularly in other places. Trees may grow for decades to get toppled in a gust.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Actually, we do get that kind of thing up here in LA and the OC, especially in LA.

A couple of years ago, we had a powerful wind that blew down a lot of trees, especially ficus.

While such trees look sturdy to the casual observer, they are often shallow-rooted from having grown in lawns and overwatered locations in general. Those trees down in SD look a lot like the ones that fell a couple of years ago here.

Our problem is that we get the odd high wind now and again, as opposed to regularly in other places. Trees may grow for decades to get toppled in a gust.

That's exactly the same as Adelaide. More trees topple when there has been an extended dry period followed by a series of heavy rain dumping thunder storms soaking the ground. The trees haven't had time to adjust to the wet soil the wind just pushes them over.

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This is like a once a week occurrence in FL in the summer if not more often. Can you imagine the panic if Cali saw a tropical storm or hurricane. Then again could you imagine the panic if FL got an earthquake. Anyway I hope you put duct tape on all the windows and filled the bathtub with water ahead of time.

Jupiter FL

in the Zone formally known as 10A

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,,,Anyway I hope you put duct tape on all the windows and filled the bathtub with water ahead of time,,,

:greenthumb:

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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We got dumped on last night, it started to drizzle like crazy and then the rains started. Not much in terms of accumulations, probably just short of 1/2" but it's a good omen. This is the first real rain storm, and it's 2 months early. The brunt of it hit far Northern California and we just got left overs here. Another storm is supposed to drop out of the Gulf of Alaska next week, and hopefully the next one will sag further South.

Rain with 70 degree temperatures is a real treat in this part of the world!

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Matt,

That was pretty dramatic! :bemused: A bit like what we get here on a fairly regular basis, except for the wind. I hope things have returned to normal by now. :)

Bo-Göran

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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and this

post-126-0-42663700-1411062581_thumb.jpg

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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you guys might get T storms and hurricanes out there but we get this :

9firenearScrippsRanch.jpg

Hmm, I'll stick with hurricanes. And god forbid we have a serious earthquake in Louisiana because with liquefaction, the entire southern half of the state would probably disappear into the mud.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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California is not safe, we have earthquakes, mud slides, fires, droughts and we elect movie stars. You do not want to move here. :)

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California is not safe, we have earthquakes, mud slides, fires, droughts and we elect movie stars. You do not want to move here. :)

You forgot the occasional high speed car chases.

-REY

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Actually, FL gets occasional earthquakes. A few years ago there was one offshore in the Gulf south of here that was rattling people's china and windows.

Meg

Palms of Victory I shall wear

Cape Coral (It's Just Paradise)
Florida
Zone 10A on the Isabelle Canal
Elevation: 15 feet

I'd like to be under the sea in an octopus' garden in the shade.

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you guys might get T storms and hurricanes out there but we get this :

9firenearScrippsRanch.jpg

Hmm, I'll stick with hurricanes. And god forbid we have a serious earthquake in Louisiana because with liquefaction, the entire southern half of the state would probably disappear into the mud.

If the New Madrid fault lets go, Northern LA might get rattled a lot.

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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And this interesting thread on US weather is in discussing palm trees worldwide why?

There were a lot of palms Matt's first video . . .

Let's keep our forum fun and friendly.

Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or lost profits or revenue, claims by third parties or for other similar costs, or any special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of my opinion or the use of this data. The accuracy or reliability of the data is not guaranteed or warranted in any way and I disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use my data. Other terms may apply.

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Looks like Southern France got hit hard with torrential downpours. They have a name for this phenomenon, http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89pisode_c%C3%A9venol, which happens when the first moisture laden cold fronts collide with the warm and humid Mediteranean air.

Looks like an active Fall weather pattern is on tap for the Northern hemisphere.

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And this interesting thread on US weather is in discussing palm trees worldwide why?

I accidentally put it in the wrong forum.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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And this interesting thread on US weather is in discussing palm trees worldwide why?

It was there because no one had reported it to me.

I'm sorry to disappoint - but I don't sit here online 24/7, read, and closely review every last thing word for word as it gets posted in real time.

Please, if you see something that isn't as it should be, just hit the report link on the bottom of every page and tell me why you are reporting it. No need to post publicly. I receive reports every time I log in.

Thanks to those of you who help make this a fun and friendly forum.

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I'll report you

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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  • 3 weeks later...

That's serious tree damage. Admittedly, there may not have been much attention to vulnerable trees and irrigation might have led to shallow root systems. But the great majority of Florida downpours (like the ones we had nearly every afternoon in September) cause minimal damage.

John Dowe did some research on wind resistance in palms and found that our Sabal palmetto and some of the Livistonas performed very well. Some feather leafs, notably Syagrus botryophora (spelling from memory) fared poorly, based on results at the Montgomery Botanical Foundation in Miami (south of Fairchild).

Anyway, congrats on actually getting some rain and condolences for the damage.

Fla. climate center: 100-119 days>85 F
USDA 1990 hardiness zone 9B
Current USDA hardiness zone 10a
4 km inland from Indian River; 27º N (equivalent to Brisbane)

Central Orlando's urban heat island may be warmer than us

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I'm going to guess this is not how everybody would like to get "relief" from the drought. . .

"Ph'nglui mglw'napalma Funkthulhu R'Lincolnea wgah'palm fhtagn"
"In his house at Lincoln, dread Funkthulhu plants palm trees."

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