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Ok all you zone 8 guys lets see what you got!


GREENHAND
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Yes zone 8 can be hard on you and your palms, here are some of the palms that have made it for me throughout the years.post-59-0-54633700-1398972344_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-51769500-1398972384_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-58526200-1398972417_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-48757200-1398972441_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-35373400-1398972454_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-28283500-1398972486_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-45642600-1398972502_thumb.jpg

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Love your place. That yard would look great in any zone. In zone 8, I would say "amazing."

Oh, and which Sabal is that in Image 3?

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

But can't you grow some of the things we covet here in the Southeast like Hedyscepe, Rhopies and cool cloud forest mountain species?

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Love your place. That yard would look great in any zone. In zone 8, I would say "amazing."

Oh, and which Sabal is that in Image 3?

Thanks Keith. Sabal texicana. its iron clad it really takes the cold well.even at 14 deg.

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

Your right Garland tx right outside of Dallas. Mexican fans do ok here but usually take heavy damage.

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

But can't you grow some of the things we covet here in the Southeast like Hedyscepe, Rhopies and cool cloud forest mountain species?

Its possible but the hot Texas sun can be tough when it 108 deg. last summer we had over 50 days of over 100 deg.

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I'm in 8A and I'd contribute, but this winter was entirely too brutal haha I'll get back to this thread sometime later on this summer. Really enjoying the pics ^ Great inspiration!

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

But can't you grow some of the things we covet here in the Southeast like Hedyscepe, Rhopies and cool cloud forest mountain species?

Yes, definitely we can grow some unique stuff up here that wouldn't grow in Texas or the Southeast. You should see the ferns that we have up here! Anything that thrives in mild, wet environments grows absolutely amazing out here. Blueberries, blackberries, etc. and other edibles are phenomenal as well. I have friends that come visit from California and elsewhere in the summer and are blown away by the quality of our produce. It just isn't a year round growing season. The one thing you guys from the Southeast/Texas may be slightly jealous of is that I haven't had to turn on my sprinkler system since last October, so we save a lot of cost in water. We hit 88 degrees yesterday but it will rain again for the next few days so I don't anticipate turning on the sprinklers until mid May or so. With all those days of heat in Texas/Southeast your water bills must be high. Although maybe your rate is lower than the West Coast with our lovely budget deficits/rate hikes.

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

But can't you grow some of the things we covet here in the Southeast like Hedyscepe, Rhopies and cool cloud forest mountain species?

Yes, definitely we can grow some unique stuff up here that wouldn't grow in Texas or the Southeast. You should see the ferns that we have up here! Anything that thrives in mild, wet environments grows absolutely amazing out here. Blueberries, blackberries, etc. and other edibles are phenomenal as well. I have friends that come visit from California and elsewhere in the summer and are blown away by the quality of our produce. It just isn't a year round growing season. The one thing you guys from the Southeast/Texas may be slightly jealous of is that I haven't had to turn on my sprinkler system since last October, so we save a lot of cost in water. We hit 88 degrees yesterday but it will rain again for the next few days so I don't anticipate turning on the sprinklers until mid May or so. With all those days of heat in Texas/Southeast your water bills must be high. Although maybe your rate is lower than the West Coast with our lovely budget deficits/rate hikes.

We are under stage 4 water restrictions yard watering 1 time everyother week hand watering anytime.we are in a drought.

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We just went through an epic flooding event this week....been wet going on two years in the coastal southeast......but weather here is like a box of chocolates. ....you know the rest.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Both great looking gardens Greenhand and Joe.

A totally different climate here for sure…8a, Washington state.

These where taken one - two weeks ago.

Schefflera.

DSC00028_zps4a5781a0.jpg

DSC00012_zps14674622.jpg

DSC00008_zps14a78eb4.jpg

DSC00006_zps029322f8.jpg

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The big difference between Southeast zone 8 and Northwest zone 8 can be seen from the size of the palms. Most of the pictures of palms in the Pacific Northwest generally include small palms. In contrast, the Southeast gardens all feature enormous size palms. It all comes down to heat units and length of the growing season. If you don't have the heat units. better not have a lot of frost, otherwise the stuff takes forever to recover and re-grow. In Southern Oregon and the far North end of California, you're actually better off inland in a USDA 9a zone where you can get some heat and grow nice sabals and livistona than along the coast in a USDA 9b climate where even canary date palms fail to produce viable seed as a result of the lack of heat and the almost permanently overcast weather.

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I'm amazed at what you guys can do in Zone 8. It offers some perspective - I often catch myself thinking about what I can't do in 9b, but there is so much that can be done even in Zone 8.

Ben Rogers

On the border of Concord & Clayton in the East Bay hills - Elev 387 ft 37.95 °N, 121.94 °W

My back yard weather station: http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?query=37.954%2C-121.945&sp=KCACONCO37

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Great palms greenhand ! I remember seeing your garden on here yrs ago !

Old Beach ,Hobart
Tasmania ,Australia. 42 " south
Cool Maritime climate

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

But can't you grow some of the things we covet here in the Southeast like Hedyscepe, Rhopies and cool cloud forest mountain species?

I very much doubt that Hedyscepe, Rhopies would grow up in the far north west as they would die at temperatures below 25 f which would occur every few year and even lower temps .

Old Beach ,Hobart
Tasmania ,Australia. 42 " south
Cool Maritime climate

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Definitely impressive for zone 8! Although I must say since you don't post your location (I'm guessing TX or LA by the photos) saying zone 8 is somewhat vague. Are you in 8a or 8b? Dry or wet climate? The palms you can grow in a zone 8 South Carolina vs. a zone 8 Seattle are much much different. I can't grow 2/3 of the palms you have there in my zone 8. So I am impressed, but wet vs. dry makes a huge difference as we all know. I can grow one hell of a Windmill palm, but all my Mexican fan palms died at 16F (not from cold but from fungus/disease), my Butias made it through barely and same thing with my Med. Fan palms - marginal, and Sabals absolutely will not grow here long term, although many have tried. Looks like you have put a lot of effort into your yard and it has paid off.

But can't you grow some of the things we covet here in the Southeast like Hedyscepe, Rhopies and cool cloud forest mountain species?

I very much doubt that Hedyscepe, Rhopies would grow up in the far north west as they would die at temperatures below 25 f which would occur every few year and even lower temps .

You can't even grow them in the Bay area except in the most favorable microclimates with the least amount of frost.

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Best thing about living here compare to other zone 8 place in the US is we can actually get out and enjoy the weather in summer without sweating in all the heat. What we lack in palm trees we make up for in huge leaf plants. It's all good, some people hate temps below 85F but we love it. Also remember were next to the canadian boarder at 48N-49N. There is no place in US thats as warm as us on the East coast that far north.

Willials I may have lost my W. robusta this winter too from rot…this was the first time I didn't put a rain cover over it. I did some cutting back so will have to see if it will recover.

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That's actually a good idea though to use a rain cover...never thought of that. What do you normally use, some kind of plastic tarp? Thanks for the tip.

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Tied up the leaves loosely and covered with clear plastic, that pretty much it.

I have a pop up greenhouse on it now to give some extra heat. If it doesn't make it no big deal… I just won't try one again.

Lots of other cool stuff I could try in that spot.

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I understand about the Rhopies and other high altitude stuff that far north now. Bet you guys can grow some killer bamboo. What about gunnera ? What was that plant with all the blue flowers?

Greenhand .... have you tried any Trithrinax or Nannnorops there?

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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I understand about the Rhopies and other high altitude stuff that far north now. Bet you guys can grow some killer bamboo. What about gunnera ? What was that plant with all the blue flowers?

Greenhand .... have you tried any Trithrinax or Nannnorops there?

I have never tryed them, but i am willing to if i can find them.

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From this spring.

DSC00019_zps2bd8eb09.jpg

DSC00071_zps7d4c3262.jpg

Chamaedorea radicalis

[url=http://s1295.photobucket.com/user/mygarden13/media/DSC00002_zpsf99f829c.jpg.html]DSC00002_zpsf99f829c.jpg[/url

Here in the PNW we are more famous for exotic trees and shrubs and exotic flowers from around the world…..Palm trees not so much! ]

What is that awsome blue flowering shrub.

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Best thing about living here compare to other zone 8 place in the US is we can actually get out and enjoy the weather in summer without sweating in all the heat. What we lack in palm trees we make up for in huge leaf plants. It's all good, some people hate temps below 85F but we love it. Also remember were next to the canadian boarder at 48N-49N. There is no place in US thats as warm as us on the East coast that far north.

Willials I may have lost my W. robusta this winter too from rot…this was the first time I didn't put a rain cover over it. I did some cutting back so will have to see if it will recover.

I am curious, besides gunnera, what huge leaf plants can you grow up there? Seems most of the stuff I see mentioned in pictures is hardy stuff, which usually translates into small leaves unless it's deciduous. Having large leaves is not a good frost adaptation.

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I understand about the Rhopies and other high altitude stuff that far north now. Bet you guys can grow some killer bamboo. What about gunnera ? What was that plant with all the blue flowers?

Greenhand .... have you tried any Trithrinax or Nannnorops there?

Yes we can grow killer bamboo, and gunnera are awesome plants I’ve been thinking about planting one since most gardeners in the US can’t grow them like we can here.

The awesome blue flowering shrub is a native from California called Ceanothus. Fragrance is very sweet and it so drought tolerant that if you water it in summer it will drop its leaves like a hot potato.

Axel a few big leaf plants ( also know as architectural plants) off the top of my head, Gunnera, melianthus major, bananas, canna, big leaf rhododendrons, maples, cardoons, acanthus mollis, Albizia, Dicksonia, Echium pininiana, Eriobotrya, Fatsia, Magnolia delavayi, Ligularia, petasites, podophyllum, Schefflera delavayi, Angelica gigs, Astilboides tabularis, Farfugium japonicum giganteum. and so on, so on. You are right most of the big leaf plants are deciduous in zone 8.

Edited by Palm crazy
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I understand about the Rhopies and other high altitude stuff that far north now. Bet you guys can grow some killer bamboo. What about gunnera ? What was that plant with all the blue flowers?

Greenhand .... have you tried any Trithrinax or Nannnorops there?

Yes we can grow killer bamboo, and gunnera are awesome plants I’ve been thinking about planting one since most gardeners in the US can’t grow them like we can here.

The awesome blue flowering shrub is a native from California called Ceanothus. Fragrance is very sweet and it so drought tolerant that if you water it in summer it will drop its leaves like a hot potato.

Axel a few big leaf plants ( also know as architectural plants) off the top of my head, Gunnera, melianthus major, bananas, canna, big leaf rhododendrons, maples, cardoons, acanthus mollis, Albizia, Dicksonia, Echium pininiana, Eriobotrya, Fatsia, Magnolia delavayi, Ligularia, petasites, podophyllum, Schefflera delavayi, Angelica gigs, Astilboides tabularis, Farfugium japonicum giganteum. and so on, so on. You are right most of the big leaf plants are deciduous in zone 8.

I am always looking for nice big leafed plants to add in my lower garden where there is more frost, that's where my garden goes from 10a into a warm 9b. The bulk of it is desert themed (bismarckia and brahea) or fruit orchard (citrus, avocado, guava and macademia), so no point putting big leafed plants there. But I have an area near my oaks where I grow my sabals and a few other hardy but tropical looking palms. That's also where I grow bamboo (oldhamiii which makes insanely enormous canes) and some other tropicals to get that lush Hawaii look and feel.

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I understand about the Rhopies and other high altitude stuff that far north now. Bet you guys can grow some killer bamboo. What about gunnera ? What was that plant with all the blue flowers?

Greenhand .... have you tried any Trithrinax or Nannnorops there?

Yes we can grow killer bamboo, and gunnera are awesome plants I’ve been thinking about planting one since most gardeners in the US can’t grow them like we can here.

The awesome blue flowering shrub is a native from California called Ceanothus. Fragrance is very sweet and it so drought tolerant that if you water it in summer it will drop its leaves like a hot potato.

Axel a few big leaf plants ( also know as architectural plants) off the top of my head, Gunnera, melianthus major, bananas, canna, big leaf rhododendrons, maples, cardoons, acanthus mollis, Albizia, Dicksonia, Echium pininiana, Eriobotrya, Fatsia, Magnolia delavayi, Ligularia, petasites, podophyllum, Schefflera delavayi, Angelica gigs, Astilboides tabularis, Farfugium japonicum giganteum. and so on, so on. You are right most of the big leaf plants are deciduous in zone 8.

I am always looking for nice big leafed plants to add in my lower garden where there is more frost, that's where my garden goes from 10a into a warm 9b. The bulk of it is desert themed (bismarckia and brahea) or fruit orchard (citrus, avocado, guava and macademia), so no point putting big leafed plants there. But I have an area near my oaks where I grow my sabals and a few other hardy but tropical looking palms. That's also where I grow bamboo (oldhamiii which makes insanely enormous canes) and some other tropicals to get that lush Hawaii look and feel.

If you have easy watering down there I would plant cordyline cherry sensation, banana red tiger, canna african sunset, some gingers, tree ferns and some desert type bromeliads that would give you more of a colourful Hawaii look and feel and all would be evergreen for you, you may have better ideas since those are the same plants I use, LOL! Also creeping fuchsia ‘Autumnale’ has a vibrant foliage that brightens the shadiest area thats one I haven’t grown in a long time.

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Heres another interesting very drought tolerant plant would be different for you Axel, Argyrocytisus battandieri Big yellow flowers smell like pineapple/citrus. Once establish never needs watering.

Edited by Palm crazy
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This windmill has been growing in my backyard for 15 years it is the most cold hardy palm i got.

post-59-0-04527800-1399315279_thumb.jpg

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