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MKIVRYAN

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1 hour ago, 96720 said:

Robelenii is from Laos, Vietnam and southern China where it grows along rivers in areas that are periodically flooded so you can see they love water. They also don’t like cold a freeze could damage the fronds but unless it was a hard freeze they come back fairly quickly.

Although it could be cold, yes - He is in Havasu City - there are Pygmy date palms in nearly every single landscape there - untouched - so it's more likely a water issue since it's one of the driest hottest places on earth.  (zone 10a no recent freezes of any consequence there in the last few years that I'm aware of.)

Edited by rogets395
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  • 1 month later...

Hi All,

I am a newborn palm addict and wanted to reach out to the community. The thread has been quiet so I figured quite a few people with some beautiful med fan palms to share here is mine. Please share your biggest! 

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Welcome to palm talk!! That is not one of my favorite palms it ranks right up there with queens but at least Chamaerops grow here and look good!

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Beautiful @aztropic
@96720 I agree not one of my favorites either but I figured everyone may have one to share. 
Here is my new baby Copernicia Hospita (Blue)   To share something a little less common :) 

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I am curious if anyone has experience growing Brahea Dulcis in the desert? I haven’t heard much on this species in terms of the valley if anyone has any knowledge of how it may perform in our conditions I would love to hear.  Thanks 

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48 minutes ago, AzulPalmsAZ said:

Beautiful @aztropic
@96720 I agree not one of my favorites either but I figured everyone may have one to share. 
Here is my new baby Copernicia Hospita (Blue)   To share something a little less common :) 

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I've grown over a hundred various Copernicia from seed,and it's been my experience that if they are going to be blue,you will see it right from the very first seed leaf. Unfortunately,I don't think yours will ever blue up,even with age.:crying:

Here is a Copernicia yarey,basically a miniature hospita,that I grew from seed I personally collected from blue trees in Cuba. It has always been this same color,right from the very first sprout. If you are looking to buy a blue copernicia,make SURE you see the blue in the actual plant you are buying. Even if the seeds came off a blue tree,there is still a chance that offspring could turn out green,due to how easily the species hybridizes. When you know the facts,you won't be fooled again.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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1 hour ago, AzulPalmsAZ said:

I am curious if anyone has experience growing Brahea Dulcis in the desert? I haven’t heard much on this species in terms of the valley if anyone has any knowledge of how it may perform in our conditions I would love to hear.  Thanks 

Only Brahea species I have experience with is armata.  I planted a seed batch of these about 20 years ago. This one is only now at roof height,after all that time.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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1 hour ago, aztropic said:

I've grown over a hundred various Copernicia from seed,and it's been my experience that if they are going to be blue,you will see it right from the very first seed leaf. Unfortunately,I don't think yours will ever blue up,even with age.:crying:

Here is a Copernicia yarey,basically a miniature hospita,that I grew from seed I personally collected from blue trees in Cuba. It has always been this same color,right from the very first sprout. If you are looking to buy a blue copernicia,make SURE you see the blue in the actual plant you are buying. Even if the seeds came off a blue tree,there is still a chance that offspring could turn out green,due to how easily the species hybridizes. When you know the facts,you won't be fooled again.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Thanks for the bad news Scott! Obviously I am an amateur and only going off what was listed as sold to me :( I really wanted a blue yarey and thanks to you I know better now.
I’ve been following your posts and went with a few Copernicia species due to your success. I am also growing a macroglassa, and Glabrescens. Appreciate your leadership around here as I have chosen many species from your comments. 

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Macroglossa and glabrecens seem to both be good choices for our area. Mine have been in the ground at least 15 years and are still going. Here's my in ground macroglossa,some macroglossa seedlings,and the glabrecens.:greenthumb:

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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  • 3 weeks later...

I got these Phoenix  dactylifera planted about a year and a half ago (thanks AZ tropic!) and they’re starting to grow more leaves from a second area.

 

Should I cut it off or let it grow?

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Phoenix dactylifera sucker there are 4 suckers that grow from the base that are used for new plants then they sucker a lot on the trunk cut them off and keep cutting them off until they quit growing have fun!!

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Yes. Cut the suckers off unless you want a giant,spiky, bush. They will produce suckers till they get about 10 feet of wood,then they seem to maintain a single trunk after that. Good,trouble free species for desert conditions!:greenthumb:

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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Hi, amazing Palm enthusiasts!  

I have read this entire AZ palm thread and am in awe of all your dedication.

I am desperately in need of your wisdom.  I am in need of a successful self cleaning palm (husband's demand) that will grow with care in the valley.  I live in an HOA with some rules, but can get away with mid height trees.

1.  Royal vs foxtail.  Which survives better here?  I understand both need cold weather protection, and enough water.  But is one easier than the other, and why?

2. How tall do royals get, and how long to that mature height?  I can't get away with anything above 30.

3. Pseudophoenix...they are amazing looking, and I am encouraged by the feasibility in the valley.  But where to buy?  And mature height?  I know they take a while to get a trunk, but how long?

Any support would be appreciated.

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Hands down,a royal is much more likely to survive our conditions than a foxtail. The reason is,larger trees will take cold down to the mid 20's and come back,even from complete defoliation. I've found foxtails are dead by about 28F in our area. I only have 1 mature foxtail,and have lost several large ones over the years due to our extremes.

How tall royals can get is really a measure of time. They can reach heights up to 100 feet,but it will never happen out here. I have 4 trees that are about 25 feet tall,and I grew them from seed I started in 1997. They seem to grow about the same speed as a queen palm. One thing you need to know and HEED about growing ANY self cleaning,crown shafted palm in our desert is that they need to be protected as much as possible from our extreme,afternoon,summer sun. If you look at most of the palms being grown locally,you will notice the trunks are protected from direct sun by thick boots and fiber,or very thick(dead) outsides of the trunk. Crown shafted palms trunks exteriors are living tissue that will be cooked and killed in our direct afternoon summer sun. They must be started as really large trees,like mine,(they can be imported from CA) or else started on the east side of a house or something else that can block afternoon sun. Planting it in the front yard by itself would be a certain death sentence.

Pseudophoenix seem to do well here,but you will have to travel to South Florida to find one of any size. I grew a batch of these from seed I started in 2000. I sold about 50 of them,mostly locally, (a few shipped to California) between 2010 and 2015. After 15 years of local growing,they were just 5 gallon size,and would probably take about another 15 years to develop any vertical height to the trunk. Just too slow growing to even consider,without importing at least a 15 gallon size,minimum.

If you happen to live inside the 101 loop,that area is a little warmer,and you would have a better chance of success with crown shafted palms. Places like Queen Creek,South Gilbert,or Chandler are generally a few degrees colder,and will require more effort to protect from any winter cold snaps below freezing.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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Awesome input, thank you!

So the royals you have from seed that are only 25 feet...what height DO you suspect if never to 100?  

Also, mine would have afternoon sun shade, but not once they are the tallest thing in the yard.  What do all of you do to protect them from afternoon shade once they are taller?

 

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Your overthinking this...Are you still going to be living in that house in 25 years? If it gets too tall and somebody complains,you deal with it then. Why deprive yourself because your HOA imposes some arbitrary limit on how high a tree can be in your yard. Are they going to measure it every year? Maybe the height rule will disappear from the CCR's in a few years as your neighborhood matures and other houses have taller trees. I've seen royals get to at least 40 feet around here. Does that mean you can't plant one ever because of it's future potential? Most get removed or die on their own before ever reaching that size in Arizona.

When they are the tallest thing in the yard,they don't need any further protection even over winter as the trunk will be at least 18 inches in diameter. The western side may burn some,but not enough to kill the tree.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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Aztropic, I completely agree.  We have had the same exact thoughts on the HOA rules.  Better to ask forgiveness than permission, ha!

I appreciate the feedback.  Super excited to get planting.

 

 

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Ran across this interesting hybrid Phoenix. Looks to be a pygmy,crossed with a true date. A single leaf just touched me and already poked a painful hole. :wacko:

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20220308_132125180_HDR.jpg

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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54 minutes ago, aztropic said:

Ran across this interesting hybrid Phoenix. Looks to be a pygmy,crossed with a true date. A single leaf just touched me and already poked a painful hole. :wacko:

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20220308_132125180_HDR.jpg

Nice looking hybrid Scott in spite of the spines!  I'm growing a similar looking Phoenix that was intentionally hybridized by @Phoenikakias (Thanks Konstantinos!) that is loureiroi x roebelinii.  Still a seedling but it is starting to bulk up.  I'm looking forward to seeing what it will ultimately look like!

IMG_20220308_151940.jpg

Edited by Fusca
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Jon Sunder

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It’s hit or miss with those coming in from Florida, bought one last year in March and planted it in a wonderful spot here in AZ. Didn’t last four months. 

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16 minutes ago, xoRudy said:

It’s hit or miss with those coming in from Florida, bought one last year in March and planted it in a wonderful spot here in AZ. Didn’t last four months. 

hope I'll have better luck...I have a nice eastern exposure spot for it, and, its generally well shaded in the afternoon right there

 

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I know we like pictures here...here is a interesting view of my eastern wall, that backs up to a wash

palm row.jpg

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Hi Everyone,

Im John. Nice too meet everyone. I havent posted on here in a long time, but Im curious on why not just start any palms that are exotic in Phoenix as seeds and raise them up. Sure, it will take time of course but I believe the palm will better acclimate. 

Ok...stupid question, but what other exotic palms are people growing that could survive in the Phoenix area?

Nice too meet everyone!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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31 minutes ago, AZ RARE PALM ENTHUSIAST said:

 

Ok...stupid question, but what other exotic palms are people growing that could survive in the Phoenix area?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the previous 23 pages of this thread...B)

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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Hey AzTropic

I did read...I did see some good indicators on different stuff we can grow. Im into palms and flowering plants that could have a chance. Im in Mesa as well!

John

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On 3/8/2022 at 10:27 PM, aztropic said:

Ran across this interesting hybrid Phoenix. Looks to be a pygmy,crossed with a true date. A single leaf just touched me and already poked a painful hole. :wacko:

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20220308_132125180_HDR.jpg

Show me the spines! I am not familiar with the extremely arid climate of Arizona, but here roebelenii hybrids have never displayed so far leaflets with pungent tips.  Even those hybrids between roebelenii and theophrasti lack pungent tips.

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On 3/8/2022 at 11:21 PM, Fusca said:

Nice looking hybrid Scott in spite of the spines!  I'm growing a similar looking Phoenix that was intentionally hybridized by @Phoenikakias (Thanks Konstantinos!) that is loureiroi x roebelinii.  Still a seedling but it is starting to bulk up.  I'm looking forward to seeing what it will ultimately look like!

IMG_20220308_151940.jpg

The other way around: loureiroi x roebelenii. It must be several years old, as long as I can recall, when I offered such seeds for the last time . So the plant must be a slow grower, which is very surprising, as here such seedlings exploded with growth in their early stages inside my cold frame. They produced namely first leaf division within a year after germination. On the other hand roebelenii x reclinata hybrids were initialy quite slow growers. How deep is the cup-pot?

Edited by Phoenikakias
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6 hours ago, Phoenikakias said:

The other way around: loureiroi x roebelenii. It must be several years old, as long as I can recall, when I offered such seeds for the last time . So the plant must be a slow grower, which is very surprising, as here such seedlings exploded with growth in their early stages inside my cold frame. They produced namely first leaf division within a year after germination. On the other hand roebelenii x reclinata hybrids were initialy quite slow growers. How deep is the cup-pot?

I thought I might have had the order wrong since roebelinii would be much easier to pollinate.  I think I got the seeds from you at the end of 2019.  Roebelinii x reclinata seeds all got moldy but I did get one of the roebelinii x louireroi.  The pot is about 8" deep - it might be time to go deeper.

Edited by Fusca

Jon Sunder

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On 3/8/2022 at 6:31 PM, 96720 said:

How much 

Too much for the condition their in... They all seem to have considerable windburn/cold damage already. (30) 15 gallon and (7) 25 gallon plants currently available. (20) 3 gallon foxtails are all pretty yellow too.:wacko:

 

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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14 hours ago, Phoenikakias said:

Show me the spines! I am not familiar with the extremely arid climate of Arizona, but here roebelenii hybrids have never displayed so far leaflets with pungent tips.  Even those hybrids between roebelenii and theophrasti lack pungent tips.

Went back to the nursery to take some closeups,but somebody had already bought the palm. It was gone. Actual spines were thin and round; exactly like a pigmy.

 

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

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Mesa, Arizona

 

Temps between 29F and 115F each year

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14 hours ago, aztropic said:

Too much for the condition their in... They all seem to have considerable windburn/cold damage already. (30) 15 gallon and (7) 25 gallon plants currently available. (20) 3 gallon foxtails are all pretty yellow too.:wacko:

 

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

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Had I the space in AZ, I would buy the Cuban Royal. 

5 year high 42.2C/108F (07/06/2018)--5 year low 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)--Lowest recent/current winter: 4.6C/40.3F (1/19/2023)

 

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I'll let you guys know how mine progresses; so far, looks alot better than it did 5 days ago, now that it in the ground, getting 8 hours of decent sun light

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