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Help selecting palms in 9A FL


LI_Pets
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wow, that just made me change the location I was planning, very nice

It's hard to find the growth rates on palms they say slow or fast.

it would be nice to know 1 foot a year 6 inches a year etc.

Edited by LI_Pets
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I think part of the reason you dont see an actual number is because it varies so much by each individual plant (ever noticed people planting palms in a row? They never end up the same height). I think whats more important with palms is knowing eventual height and habitus.

-Krishna

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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Excellent advice throughout this thread. I don't remember seeing L. chinesis on your list. These are great palms for understory but will eventually get tall over many years. They are available everywhere and pretty cheap. You can get a large triple at one of the box stores in the spring and the leaves have a very large tropical look especially in the shade.

You might want to check out my thread as I am putting in many of the same palms that you have purchased. I'm getting large sizes as I am too old and too impatient to wait, however, I will have alot of smaller stuff that was grown from seed underneath. Here is the link...

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/34415-alicehunter2000s-beach-party-by-ken-johnson/page-1

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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Great Haul Bob! You will be happy with those nice choices. Mule palms are among the fastest growing palms out there, they will make the fastest canopy for your zone I expect. And Krishna, that mule is a beauty, it looks very happy! One thing to consider when placing is height compatibility. For example a smaller palm can be placed closer to a larger one since the frowns wont compete as much for space. The palms in your haul that are going to need room are bismarckias, sabal causiarum and Canary Island date palm. All 3 are eventually monsters with wide crows, and they wont grow super fast, except perhaps the bizzie, which can be a fairly quick grower.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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what's your guess on the growth rates per year, as of today

bismarckias 4'

Canary Island date palm 5'

sabal causiarum 5'

one part of the house has solar panels, if these get that big fast I should plant them away from the area of the panels, that area can max hgt out at 25' before they would interfere with the panels.

.

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Bob,

the sabal causiarum will need 2 summers to develop its subterranean trunk, they it will start growing for you(~2' a year. If you have seen a big causiarum check out alicehunter2000 beach party post #183, they are beasts which will take your 5 footer about 10 years to get to the size of these. this palm will take more time, but it could be your most prized palm. And they self clean, unlike most other sabals.

CIDP, not as familliar with growth rates in florida, I ruled this one out of my yard as too big and I fear the trimming with those 8" thorns on those heavy petioles.

Bismarckias- this will grow fastest for you if it doesnt see a cold frost for a few years, but gets plenty if sun. they develop big underground root systems and then they take off. the first year it will be developing the root system. after the first 2 years, it could grow 2 1/2-3' a year in overall height.

here are my two bizzies and pics of their growth progress year to year

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/36116-bismarckias-are-pretty-fast-growers-in-fla/

I am in 9B/10A, but you should get similar growth if you take care of them. Bizzies want plenty fo sun and good drainage.

Edited by sonoranfans

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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two quick questions,

One of the palms are in the sun and it appears clamping up a bit yesterday, today slight yellowing on a few tips????

Is it in too much sun, it was suppose to be sugar, the tag is hard to read but says

"Aur guprera arenia" best I can read it.

Is this possibly an Australian sugar?

waiting for help to plant these 12 palms, how much water should I give them in the containers, all look good except the one mentioned above.

......

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It's not the silver sea shore, it was invoiced "arenga elgleri" but the tag says "Aur guprera arenia" best I can read it.

generally yellow tip are too much sun or sunburn is that correct?

Edited by LI_Pets
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If its arenga engleri, I'd get it in shade. I know that they can take sun when established, but they look alot better in shade. Maybe a pic can help. I'd put it in the shade nonetheless.

Formerly in Gilbert AZ, zone 9a/9b. Now in Palmetto, Florida Zone 9b/10a??

 

Tom Blank

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Tom put together a great list. One caution I would have on the big fan and big feather (other than mule) is that they are really too large for most yards. If you plant them, plant them further from the house. Plant some of the smaller but sill large ones closer to the house. Also watch spacing.

I planted a Sabal causiarum, domingensis, and uresana in my yard about ten years ago. After a few years I realized that they were too close to the house and each other so I removed the causairum and domingensis. I'm so glad that I did. The uresana is massive and almost too close to the house - the trunk will eventually be about 6 inches from the gutter.

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  • 1 month later...

Well from a slow start I'm now pushing 30 cold tolerant palms, I have to stop now for sure.

I need to list all I have soon, thanks for the help I received here.

I think the thing that I see is the 1 gal an hour for 4 hours (4g every other day) has been the trick to not having any browning on any.

A few that didn't have drips showed stress, when I added drips to those they responded quick

In a few weeks I was thinking to cut the frequency down to twice a week, what do you folks think about that?

tks

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Looking forward to this list, and thoughts on how each is performing.

In my post I sometimes express "my" opinion. Warning, it may differ from "your" opinion. If so, please do not feel insulted, just state your own if you wish. Any data in this post is provided 'as is' and in no event shall I be liable for any damages, including, without limitation, damages resulting from accuracy or lack thereof, insult, or any other damages

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Once the rains really start coming you can drastically reduce watering, but at the same time when it doesn't rain Central FL is like a desert in the summer. I'd adjust watering based on what the weather is like for the week.

-Krishna

Kailua, Oahu HI. Near the beach but dry!

Still have a garden in Zone 9a Inland North Central Florida (Ocala)

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Well..... going away mid june til mid Sept.

But the system has a built in moisture sensor, plus I will have a home watch person weekly and neighbors.

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Dump the Canary and get a Silver :badday: . Also, the raphis can take a good amount of sun, just make sure to acclimate over a month or so if you're not sure how it was grown.

Jason

Gainesville, Florida

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  • 2 years later...
On 4/29/2013, 12:25:54, _Keith said:

Looking forward to this list, and thoughts on how each is performing.

 

Keith - how many Miles do you have planted? How large is your tallest muley?

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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18 hours ago, Laaz said:

Instead of the regular sago, find the Cycas taitungensis, they get a bit larger & aren't affected by scale.

I’m glad to read there is a cycad which is resistant to scale. Can anyone recommend any other varieties of scale resistant cycads? It’s been a loosing battle with white scale on my Cycad revolta plants. I have eight of them that are all infested. When I see them flaring up in the month of August, I’ve tried to control it by using coffee grounds and spraying every two weeks, and I even used a systemic insecticide, but my efforts are fruitless. It happens year after year, and I just want to get rid of them now. It also seems every plant in the neighborhood is affected as well.

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Try drenching them with Bayer Advanced for fruit & vegetables. It is taken up in the roots and holds in the leaves. You may have to apply it several times a year.

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Here's a perfect example in my yard, King sago & Taitungensis right next to each other. Notice the taitungensis has no scale & the king does. I have replaced almost all of my king's with taitungensis for this reason.


111nup2.jpg

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  • 7 months later...

LI Pets....how about a few pictures and an update on your plantings.

David Simms zone 9a on Highway 30a

200 steps from the Gulf in NW Florida

30 ft. elevation and sandy soil

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I second that.

Jeremy Breland
Norfolk, Va: USDA hardiness zone 8a, AHS heat zone 5, Sunset climate zone 31
Hot and humid summers; cool and moist winters.
Jacksonville FL: USDA hardiness zone 9a/9b, AHS heat zone 9, Sunset climate zone 28
Hot and humid summers; warm and moist winters punctuated by cold spells.

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