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Carpoxylon macrospermum


elHoagie
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three one-gallon plants inside my greenhouse.  No damage so far after 33F.

Jack Sayers

East Los Angeles

growing cold tolerant palms halfway between the equator and the arctic circle...

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5-gal. planted mid-August 2006.  Covered by clear plastic portable greenhouse with colored lights strung through the vents.

Lowest low outside a few feet away, 31F, dry.

One very pale yellow leaf.  Overall plant looks slightly pale.  Too soon to celebrate or write an epitaph.

Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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Carpoxylon macrospermum

5 gallon, in pot, in cold frame (poly film + 40% shade cloth)

37F on multiple nights, no dramatic damage but some hints of spotting due to ongoing nightly cold.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Didn't have the guts to leave mine outside during this spell. Has been outside the rest of the time however, down to 34F without any noticeable wear. Of greater interest to me is that has continued to steadily push a spear up during the cold weather. This is certainly no tropical "wimp".

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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  • 5 weeks later...

Carpoxylons will take alot of cold, easily down in the low 30's. Planted in the ground will also make them tougher.

Jeff

Searle Brothers Nursery Inc.

and The Rainforest Collection.

Southwest Ranches,Fl.

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  • 2 months later...

It's official:  Elvis has left the building.

Kim Cyr

Between the beach and the bays, Point Loma, San Diego, California USA
and on a 300 year-old lava flow, Pahoa, Hawaii, 1/4 mile from the 2018 flow
All characters  in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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Maybe this should be moved to the "Memorials" section.

Thanks to those of you who help make this a fun and friendly forum.

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  • 4 months later...

(Jeff Searle @ Feb. 15 2007,21:50)

QUOTE
Carpoxylons will take alot of cold, easily down in the low 30's. Planted in the ground will also make them tougher.

Jeff

Jeff,

Do you ever experience frost or freeze in your location, or more specifically, have the Carpoxylons actually gotten a frost or freeze?  

Thanks in advance.

Jason

BTW, is your name pronounced Searl or Searl-ee?

Skell's Bells

 

 

Inland Central Florida, 28N, 81W. Humid-subtropical climate with occasional frosts and freezes. Zone 9b.

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  • 5 months later...

Carpoxylon survived, in ground, over winter, with no protection in SoCals long cool winter.  Lowest extreme temps were 38F & 39F on a couple of nights.  It's still acclimating to sun so older leaves are somewhat crispy, but I don't think there was any cold damage done.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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No more than a month. And the seedlings are VERY robust. I put mine directly into 5G pots.

Leilani Estates, 25 mls/40 km south of Hilo, Big Island of Hawai'i. Elevation 880 ft/270 m. Average rainfall 140 inches/3550 mm

 

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  • 1 month later...

Update. After seeing lows in the high 30's F. The Spring leaf came out smaller. It's acclimating to sun but I'd say it's a slightly stunted leaf. It has nice shape and color just a bit smaller. Plant is growing nicely otherwise. So far I'd rank it along side of Clinostigma savoryanum as far as cold tenderness.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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I left my 5g tall Carpoxylon out in this past February''s cold snap... My shadehouse bottomed out at temps of 45.9F and got the same leaf stunting effect Matt is describing... I think having plants in the ground is so much easier on them.

Pics of two different examples...

The stunted leaf

DSC01721.jpg

This was the leaf that came up immediately after the stunted leaf...

DSC01722.jpg

Here's another example of the cold damage to this young palm...

DSC01723.jpg

  • Upvote 1
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Mine was in the ground from a 7 gallon and died this winter. I hit 36 or so. I think this plant will be more along the lines of a Bottle Palm here in SoCal.

Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)

Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."

-- Alfred Austin

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Len, I'm curious, did you have yours in any sun? Mine was seeing about 4 hours of afternoon sun. Even on a cold day, if the sun was out the Carpoxylon was getting at least some warmth. I'm debating wheather or not to plant some more Archontophoenix on the west side of it which would eventually help shade it a bit, hopefully making it look prettier. But if shade is a death sentence then no way. What say you? Do it?

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Part of the reason it died at 36 degrees was the fact it had too much sun. It went into winter a little burnt. It actually tired like hell to hang in there and that last cold snap in April KO'ed it. I have another larger one I will acclimate over the next year and try in a primo spot in my yard. So I have not given up.

Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)

Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."

-- Alfred Austin

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I filled the entire bottom of the hole and backfilled the bottom portion around the rootball with coarse sand to combat the beginings of any rot. Then the top portion of the rootball I backfilled with ammended topsoil and then mulched on top of that to hold in moisture. I did not water deeply all winter. Just sprayed the surface a bit to keep it moist on those dry weeks. Maybe I have the skills....maybe it was the spot...maybe it was just luck. I like to think that it's because I have luck. Crap, I just sprained my finger typing this ....I've gotta go.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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I filled the entire bottom of the hole and backfilled the bottom portion around the rootball with coarse sand to combat the beginings of any rot. Then the top portion of the rootball I backfilled with ammended topsoil and then mulched on top of that to hold in moisture. I did not water deeply all winter. Just sprayed the surface a bit to keep it moist on those dry weeks. Maybe I have the skills....maybe it was the spot...maybe it was just luck. I like to think that it's because I have luck. Crap, I just sprained my finger typing this ....I've gotta go.

LOL

Coastal San Diego, California

Z10b

Dry summer subtropical/Mediterranean

warm summer/mild winter

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  • 7 months later...

I have a small one in the ground. Covered the crown with a mulch pile and after 32f two times in a row it looks fine except for some light spots after a frost.l it has limited canopy.

With a tin cup for a chalice

Fill it up with good red wine,

And I'm-a chewin' on a honeysuckle vine.

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  • 1 year later...
  • 5 months later...

Len,

Any updates on the 2nd one?

Part of the reason it died at 36 degrees was the fact it had too much sun. It went into winter a little burnt. It actually tired like hell to hang in there and that last cold snap in April KO'ed it. I have another larger one I will acclimate over the next year and try in a primo spot in my yard. So I have not given up.

Huntington Beach, CA

USDA Zone 10a/10b

Sunset Zone 24

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Joe it is in a 25 gallon pot and has been outside through 2008/2009 winter and starting thisone. Each year it looks worse. It can't replace damaged leaves with new ones. Doubt this plant will grow here long term.

Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)

Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."

-- Alfred Austin

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This one has seen 3 Winters, unprotected (except 30% shade cloth). It benefits from being planted in a reflected heat area of my side/South facing yard.

post-126-083560700 1291309263_thumb.jpg

post-126-064988400 1291309271_thumb.jpg

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Mine is not quite the size of Mattys, (doesn't sound right no matter how I word it); but it's been in the ground for 3 years now. It's under canopy between a Queen & a Beccariophoenix. This years leaves still look real good. A nearby Veitchia looks beat up, although it is less protected. They can take some cold, but the worry is always that they could get a fungal infection during Winter. I've seen evidence of "the pink" under old leaf sheaves a couple years back. What really was most stiking this year was the lack of Summer warmth it obviouly wants; it's growth this year was minimal and very late in the year. Other than that, it's remarkably tough. I just don't plan on having a grove of them, I seriously doubt it will ever look like ones in more tropical areas.

Bret

 

Coastal canyon area of San Diego

 

"In the shadow of the Cross"

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Maybe this should be moved to the "Memorials" section.

loL....

  • Upvote 1

M.H.Edwards

"Living in the Tropic's

And loving it".............. smilie.gif

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  • 9 months later...

Matty - any updated, I have a large 2 gal I'm itching to plant out, would love your advice.

Mahalo.

Aloha!

 

Always looking for "Palms of Paradise"

 

Cardiff by the Sea 10b 1/2

1/2 mile from the Blue Pacific

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Bill,

Check the "random palm parts" thread. I posted a teaser pic of my Carpoxylon's newest frond. I've had good luck with this palm and it continues to do well as long as I keep the 30% shade cloth over it. Like most tropicals, it grows fast during late Summer and Fall and is pretty slow in Winter and Spring. The Foxtail canopy is filling out nicely so hopefully next year I'll be able to take the shade cloth off of it. I water sparingly in Winter so don't be afraid to let it go relatively dry, with no irrigation for several weeks as long as it's cold, similar to what a New Caledonian palm can take; not like a Brahea or anything. And probably most importantly, plant it in that primo reflected heat spot like your west planter by the house so it has canopy above it, but the roots can bake in the afternoon sun. Or more South facing would be better for Winter I guess.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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Am I way off by saying if you can grow a foxtail, then you can grow a Carpoxylon? Same cold tolerance and about the same dimensions(maybe carpoxylon will get bigger in time)--both need a decent amount of nutrients to keep up their color, and probably the same water needs? I don't grow foxtails...

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yes, in SoCal at least

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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I have killed two Carpoxylons, but Foxtails do fine for me. So no I say. I am glad to hear some have had better luck then me. My friend Dwain has had one in the ground for 4 years now.

Len

Vista, CA (Zone 10a)

Shadowridge Area

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are."

-- Alfred Austin

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One of mine carked it ! Mikey thinks I let it dry out a bit to much :unsure:

I posted a pic of my poxy one and it has gone up to plant heaven now :(

Michael in palm paradise,

Tully, wet tropics in Australia, over 4 meters of rain every year.

Home of the Golden Gumboot, its over 8m high , our record annual rainfall.

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Just to clarify, when I said "yes", I meant "Yes, you're way off". I agree with Len that foxtails are much easier to grow, then carpoxylon, for us.

Matt Bradford

"Manambe Lavaka"

Spring Valley, CA (8.5 miles inland from San Diego Bay)

10B on the hill (635 ft. elevation)

9B in the canyon (520 ft. elevation)

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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...

Lately, It has been hard to find one, locally(and in the ground) that's not turning yellow like a magnesium deficiency...

Local magnesium deficiency? Its never been an issue in the Moose Land. Green, green, green ...

Scott - these are very large palms at maturity. It would be like growing Royals inside. I also think they relish humidity which challenges the California crowd.

  • Upvote 1

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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Lately, It has been hard to find one, locally(and in the ground) that's not turning yellow like a magnesium deficiency...

Local magnesium deficiency? Its never been an issue in the Moose Land. Green, green, green ...

Scott - these are very large palms at maturity. It would be like growing Royals inside. I also think they relish humidity which challenges the California crowd.

Aside from King palms which don't seem to slow down in growth even inside the house, I wonder if typically fast/tall palms would ever outgrow a room with tall ceilings since the environment would be so different than natural habitat. I just bought a 3ft Royal on Ebay late fall since they are so cheap to buy to see how it really goes. So far, it's no where near as as the Kings I have.

We just had a Palm conservatory open here this fall. Marjorie K. Daugherty conservatory part of Lauritzen Gardens here in Omaha so I was hoping to donate the more rare, colorful and exotic palms I have to them...if I kept them long enough to outgrow my house anyway.

post-9928-0-30442600-1418586031_thumb.jppost-9928-0-47435400-1418586084_thumb.jp

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Lately, It has been hard to find one, locally(and in the ground) that's not turning yellow like a magnesium deficiency...

Local magnesium deficiency? Its never been an issue in the Moose Land. Green, green, green ...

Scott - these are very large palms at maturity. It would be like growing Royals inside. I also think they relish humidity which challenges the California crowd.

Aside from King palms which don't seem to slow down in growth even inside the house, I wonder if typically fast/tall palms would ever outgrow a room with tall ceilings since the environment would be so different than natural habitat. I just bought a 3ft Royal on Ebay late fall since they are so cheap to buy to see how it really goes. So far, it's no where near as as the Kings I have.

We just had a Palm conservatory open here this fall. Marjorie K. Daugherty conservatory part of Lauritzen Gardens here in Omaha so I was hoping to donate the more rare, colorful and exotic palms I have to them...if I kept them long enough to outgrow my house anyway.

attachicon.gif026.JPGattachicon.gif021.JPG

Donating sounds like a fabulous idea !!! :greenthumb:

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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  • 3 years later...

Potted specimen in Tampa, about 1.5 feet tall. 28˚ with no frost: About 80% leaf damage, but the spear is intact and looks good. Similar damage to local foxtails.

Same size specimen, in ground at my garden in Palmetto: 30˚ with no frost. No damage.

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

Palmetto.gif

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