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Phoenicophorium borsigianum


cfkingfish

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We were a few days without heat at our greenhouse after the visquine tore and blew off about a month ago. The greenhouse is located almost 10 miles inland with no urban or river warming effects. I have a few 2 gallon P. borsigianums, they recived slight burn at 43.5F with no canopy.

Christian Faulkner

Venice, Florida - South Sarasota County.

www.faulknerspalms.com

 

Μολὼν λάβε

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Two dozen or so 3 leaf seedlings germinated this summer, wiped out during 42ºF event. They were under a pool screen porch and receiving irrigation every 2 mornings.

Cold damage begins to show as a thinning and subsequent drying of the new leaf then spreading down to other leaves. At this point the root system is dead by rot.

The good side: 3 survivors, 2 of them were planted in peat moss rather than heavier evergreen soil on the third one. I hope these prove to be the pick of the litter.

Frank

 

Zone 9b pine flatlands

humid/hot summers; dry/cool winters

with yearly freezes

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  • 4 weeks later...

These are beauties. Too bad they are so wimpy.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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  • 6 years later...

I had a 1 gallon borsigianum survive 33 degrees F in it's bucket, unprotected and in the center of my yard, in Sarasota last winter. It didn't see any frost. I was pleasantly surprised. It's still doing fine.

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I've lost multiple P. borsigianum at temps as "high" as 40F. I don't trust any outdoor greenhouse, space heaters etc with this palm so my current specimen watches TV with me during the winter. :) I would say Phoenicophorium easily makes the top 5 most cold tender palms list.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

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I just bought a small P borsigianum from Floribunda and I agree with Ray. I won't put it in the greenhouse this winter; I'll bring it indoors.

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Ray, what size is your palm?

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  • 4 years later...

Using all the tricks I knew, mine only lasted two cold seasons in the ground :innocent:

Coral Gables, FL 8 miles North of Fairchild USDA Zone 10B

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Mine winters in the dining room with its friends all nights under 55 degrees.

Naples (inland), FL - technically 10a but more like 9b in the winter :hmm:

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