Jump to content
  • WELCOME GUEST

    It looks as if you are viewing PalmTalk as an unregistered Guest.

    Please consider registering so as to take better advantage of our vast knowledge base and friendly community.  By registering you will gain access to many features - among them are our powerful Search feature, the ability to Private Message other Users, and be able to post and/or answer questions from all over the world. It is completely free, no “catches,” and you will have complete control over how you wish to use this site.

    PalmTalk is sponsored by the International Palm Society. - an organization dedicated to learning everything about and enjoying palm trees (and their companion plants) while conserving endangered palm species and habitat worldwide. Please take the time to know us all better and register.

    guest Renda04.jpg

Dypsis lutescens


epicure3

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone!

My Dypsis lutescens has survived almost without injury -potted and protected from the wind- -2 º. It measures 2m aprox. Today is growing. :drool:

I very much hope to plant it on the floor when it becomes a little bigger.

Happy new year!

PD: Sorry for my English...

Sur de Mallorca (39º 58′ 0″ N) - Zona USDA 9b/10a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello everyone!

My Dypsis lutescens has survived almost without injury -potted and protected from the wind- -2 º. It measures 2m aprox. Today is growing. :drool:

I very much hope to plant it on the floor when it becomes a little bigger.

Happy new year!

PD: Sorry for my English...

Happy New Year, Mónica! Glad to hear your D. lutescens is doing so well. They are elegant palms, and grow very fast. I have 3 of them in the ground and love them.

I believe lutescens can take down to 26F, especially if there's no frost, but may get burned badly. 26F would be about -3.3C (had to use the Fahrenheit to Celcius Converter which I found here: http://www.wbuf.noaa.gov/tempfc.htm). How cold do your winters usually get?

St. Pete

Zone - a wacked-out place between 9b & 10

Elevation = 44' - not that it does any good

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Burned slightly at 31 with (what I would consider) heavy frost. They will all live though.

Keith 

Palmetto, Florida (10a) and Tampa, Florida (9b/10a)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

This is all good information for me as I plan to plant a D lutescens in the ground once it (currently in a pot) is a reasonable size.

It has never dropped below 35f here in winter and because these palms grow so rapidly and recover from winter quickly, I'm hopeful it will do ok here.

I think they are a hardier than is commonly believed as the evidence suggests here.

Oceanic Climate

Annual Rainfall:1000mm

Temp Range:2c-30c

Aotearoa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine has been through a minus 5c and a minus4c with frost both times. The outer leaves burnt but the trunks suffered no damage. I think they are hard to kill.

Peachy

I came. I saw. I purchased

 

 

27.35 south.

Warm subtropical, with occasional frosts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My experience with D. lutescens is that they can take (mature with trunk) a one-night low in the upper 20s F (say -2 to -3C) with frost (growing in the open yard, not close to a house,or other protecting elements.) The foliage may get killed but the trunks should be okay.

But this past January was another story, since I had 12 straight nights of cold ( with well below normal daytime temperatures) well below 40 degrees F (say 2-3C), with five of those nights below 30 degrees F (1.1C), with two of the five nights at 27 degrees F (-2.75C).

My D. lutescens actually took 23 degrees F (-4.95C) for one night two winters ago and survived. But this past January all of my trunked D. lutescens died.

2687998530042496162S600x600Q85.jpg

Above photo shows small royal palm with D. lutescens in background. Note tallest trunked one which died due to series of freezes and prolonged cold weather.

2891123660042496162S600x600Q85.jpg

Above photo shows recovering royal palm, but clump of D. lutescens in background is faring poorly. That is a banana plant in far background that may appear to be growing in the clump of D. lutescens.

Mad about palms

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine got blasted and is coming back from the roots. I'll trash this one and pick up another big clump. This plant is too common and I'm way too impatient to wait for this one to recover.

Tampa, Interbay Peninsula, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10A

Bokeelia, Pine Island, Florida, USA

subtropical USDA Zone 10B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Our big freeze this winter was 26 F (-3 C) at the nearby airport in December, followed by 29 the next night and, 14 nights later, 29 F All the D. lutescens in the neighborhood suffered near-complete death of leaves. By now, they're producing new leaves.

Fla. climate center: 100-119 days>85 F
USDA 1990 hardiness zone 9B
Current USDA hardiness zone 10a
4 km inland from Indian River; 27º N (equivalent to Brisbane)

Central Orlando's urban heat island may be warmer than us

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

31-34 was the ultimate low so far this winter here in inland south brevard county, my Dypsis's very top leaves have experienced leaf burn, though most already have near fully grown spears ready to open into green leaves.

They are about 6ft-7ft high clusters.

I have noticed that a few years back in the big January 2010 freeze event that the ones people trim into 2-3 or 4 stalks did much worse than the clumps.

Malabar, Florida. Zone 10a, East Central Florida.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...